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I suppose the simple question is has anyone had out of spec?


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Discussion Starter #22
You can go out 3,000 th either way. Some people zero out from 1,000 th. I have found when they get to the edge, they drift back the other way. I just want to see if this bike will do that. I will find out.
 

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The crazy thing is that the 2013 models called for a valve check at 600 miles. People buying a new bike could put 600 miles on it over a weekend and then have a $300 or more service charge before they made their first payment. It pissed off a lot a new owners and the next year the valve check interval went to 16,000 miles. I strongly suspect Honda didn't change anything in the engine, but decided the bike was getting a bad reputation and it was hurting sales. It could also be that they gathered enough data to realize the system was pretty stable.
 

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For a shim-under-bucket valve clearance system, the shim will not change size, but other parts may, due to wear, for example, the cam lobes or the bucket itself.

These are two cylinder bikes with only 8 valves; no "middle cylinders" like the inline fours have, and no rear cylinders like the V's have. Why not get the service manual and a set of feeler gauges (cheap) and learn to do yourself?

I adjusted valves on my 2000 Suzuki SV650, which had a couple of them out of spec at the first check interval. (15k or so) The next interval, they were OK. I also adjusted the valves on my 1982 Suzuki GS850G, though I think that one had locknut-style valve adjustments. (easier to adjust, no shims needed, but not quite as stable as shim-under-bucket) I also checked valves on my '85 CRX at around 150,000 miles. They were OK, having probably been adjusted before. Also on my '98 Civic. At the first interval, they needed minor tweaking, and never again after that.

Guys, the mechanical engineers who design engines are not stupid. If valve clearances never drifted, they wouldn't have designed in these extra parts just for fun. Extra parts and extra complexity adds cost, which they have to pass on to us. If they weren't needed, their competitors would have figured it out, saved cost and beat them in the competitive marketplace. They're formally educated mechanical (maybe even automotive) engineers, and further educated at Honda. The parts in question are operating at hundreds of degrees and moving at thousands of RPM (over 100 revolutions per SECOND!) They are made of top-of-the-line materials, but this is extreme duty, even for hardened and tempered steel.


Bottom line, from my experience: Check the valves at the first and second interval. You'll probably find that they've moved out of spec by the first interval and not again afterwards. Then, you can rest easy knowing you did your bike good.

Then again, if you're a serial bike buyer and don't keep them more than 15k miles, you can skip it and pass it onto the buyer. But I find I can get a higher price for my vehicles when I can show that I was a conscientious owner with service records.
 

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My dealers here in Ireland are only charging €120 to check valves as long as its part of a service , it takes them 40 minutes I reckon , seen a guy do it in 20 mins on youtube .........
 

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I've done it twice on the R model and I willing to bet nobody can do it in 40 minutes. It would take me that long to get the fairings and gas tank off and that isn't even getting started on the tedious parts. F and X models might be a different story.
 

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Smaug and others:

Great posts and comments!
 
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Just saw this post, couldn't believe the BS in the first few posts. Bucket and shim systems can and do go out of spec, but it usually takes longer than a tappet and locknut system. It is very easy to check the clearances so why wouldn't you? Admittedly changing the shims can be a lot more difficult depending if the shim sits on top or under the bucket, but when it needs to be adjusted it should be!! (this keeps everything running correctly!!). As the valve gear on the 500 is quite light and the engine doesn't rev that high, the shims probably don't need changing very often (assuming you run good engine oil) but you should check the valves regularly as it might allow you to catch early signs of a valve burning out or failing before it does any real damage to the engine!! For all you newbees out there, DO CHECK YOUR VALVE CLEARANCES REGULARLY!!


Gary
 

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Thrasher,

"Just saw this post, couldn't believe the BS in the first few posts. Bucket and shim systems can and do go out of spec"

WOW!!! You may be tarred and feathered for such "anti-establishment" comments!! Watch your back!!
 

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Admittedly changing the shims can be a lot more difficult depending if the shim sits on top or under the bucket, Gary
Gary, I haven't done it yet, but I've read here that this engine is designed such that the camshafts don't have to come out to get access to the shims.
 

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get yourself a CRF450!! I have 3 and the shims get changed about every 100 hours due to valve clearances changing (Its far worse with the stock Honda valves, but even after market valves like Kibblewhite still go out and the shims need changing!!). As I stated the CBR500 is a relatively low reving, low stress engine so the valve adjustments should be very infrequent, but that should NOT prevent you from checking them on a regular basis, you just shouldn't need to do anything afterwards as hopefully the gap does NOT change..


Gary
 

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Owned a couple crf 450's, nothing but valve issues on those bikes. Dirt bikes are a different animal. My statement would not apply to those. You better check those often. And buy a shim kit...lol.

A cb500, check according to oem, but it's not as critical as some folks make it out to be. The chance of moving or replacing shims relatively rare. If they get to the edge, they will move back the other way probably from wear. That's been my ecperience.


Welcome back


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Well im almost at 60 000 Km's and booked my valve check and new spark plug's for Wednesday aug 7th so I will let you all know how it goes.Bike still run's great with no drop in performance or unusual sounds.
 
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My CBR500R at close to 60 000 Km had a perfect valve check and even the spark plugs were in great shape.Replaced plug's anyway's.They said they don't see many 500's out of spec.Oh and they charged 195 tax incl.
 

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I just did a valve adjustment check at 50,000 miles and all were within spec. This was the third check, and they are such a PITA on the R model that I don't think I am going to do another until at least 20K more miles. These valve systems seem to be very stable. I really haven't noticed any change except maybe a slight loosening of a couple of exhaust valves that were on the tight end of the tolerance, so that's good. By "slight loosening" I mean how easy it was to slide the feeler gauge in.....not even a measurable difference.
 

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I've not had first hand experience doing these valves, but from what everyone says, they stay really consistent for thousands of miles.

In the old Honda days, I adjusted my own valves approx. every 2,000 miles. Back then it was a piece of cake. 4 valve covers, small wrenches and feeler gages.

It is better that they loosen over time rather than get tighter.

Honda seems to have hit a home run here with these engines.
 
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