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Honda made a great bike in so many ways but I found the suspension was its worst quality. I had spent considerable time and money on fixing the problems and it totally transformed the bike. With the suspension changes it tracked perfectly through fast bumpy corners at high speed. The front end was much more stable and there was much reduced brake dive. Before making the changes I had considered getting a steering damper to control the front end wiggles but there was no need since the wheels seemed glued to the road. The new rear end easily absorbed both large and small bumps and there was no need to ride the footrests on rough stretches of road. The front and rear ends seem well balanced and another benefit was greatly increased comfort. It would be perfect for track use and gave an increased feeling of confidence.

I am changing to a Yamaha FJ-09 and I removed the upgraded components from the CBR. I would prefer to sell the suspension package complete but if nobody is interested I would split the parts. I have listed my price in Canadian dollars for all the items .
(shipping from Ontario Canada will be extra). If you have any questions please email me at [email protected]. I am certain that the components are in good condition but I will refund the cost for returned defects.

SHOWA REAR SHOCK from a Honda CBR600F4 with remote canister (Rebuilt Aug 2015). The shock was reconditioned re-valved and a new spring added by Jamie Daugherty of DRM Motorsports (DMr Performance Suspension). This is a top level shock with separate controls for compression damping, rebound damping and preload. The remote canister design means that it will fit the CBR500R equipped with ABS. The spring rate is the same (600lbs/inch) as the stock one on the CBR and is suitable for riders in the 150 to 180 lb weight range. The spring is easily changed for higher rider weights. I had two tries to get the configuration right and I had a longer canister hose added so I could get a perfect mount for the canister on the right side of the bike next to the rear brake fluid reservoir (see photo). A special bracket for canister attachment is included. Canadian $ 290.00

FORK SPRINGS & EMULATORS
A set of single rate FORK SPRINGS with a rate of 0.80 kg/mm plus spacers (Nov 2015). The spacers are sized for the regular fork caps. I am also including preload adjuster caps to fine tune the correct sag. Stiffer fork springs might be needed to accommodate a rider weight of more than 180lbs (springs are easily changed and cost about $80).
A pair of CARTRIDGE EMULATORS to completely alter the damping characteristics similar to a cartridge fork. The emulators are adjustable but were perfect as supplied. Adding emulators requires some modification of the fork damper tubes (Instructions supplied). For a full explanation of the role of emulators see this - Emulators-How They Work
Fork package (Springs & Emulators) Canadian $ 145.00
 

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There's a YouTube video where a guy just put in thicker fork oil 20w or 30 w fork oil & added 20-40 more mm oil to make for a stiffer front suspension. For 2015 or early you could also add a adjustable front fork cap . Total cost just a little over $100.00. If you weren't going to do track days you could forget the adjustable fork caps, that's the major cost.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
There's a YouTube video where a guy just put in thicker fork oil 20w or 30 w fork oil & added 20-40 more mm oil to make for a stiffer front suspension. For 2015 or early you could also add a adjustable front fork cap . Total cost just a little over $100.00. If you weren't going to do track days you could forget the adjustable fork caps, that's the major cost.
That's fine if there are no bumps. Emulators change the whole damping profile so high speed impacts are absorbed.
 
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I am curious how did you determine which is the best front/rear shock as a replacement to stock ones? I have CBR '16 model, and admittedly don't know almost anything about mechanical parts, but I am also looking to replace stock suspension, and wondering which route to go.
 

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I am curious how did you determine which is the best front/rear shock as a replacement to stock ones? I have CBR '16 model, and admittedly don't know almost anything about mechanical parts, but I am also looking to replace stock suspension, and wondering which route to go.
What do you do (or want to do) with your bike? That will be needed for folks to advise you.
 

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I do everything. City riding, commuting, long distance riding.. This summer I plan to hit the track too.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
I am curious how did you determine which is the best front/rear shock as a replacement to stock ones? I have CBR '16 model, and admittedly don't know almost anything about mechanical parts, but I am also looking to replace stock suspension, and wondering which route to go.
You can buy new shocks configured to your weight and riding style but they are expensive. The popular option is to use a secondhand reconditioned high quality shock. The front is a little more tricky because the stock orifice damping is very crude. Cartridge emulators are a big upgrade for relatively little money but some modifications to the fork damper rods are needed.

I obtained all my parts from Jamie Daugherty at (DMr Performance Suspension). If you have little mechanical experience you would need the help of a motorcycle mechanic for installation. Your weight is important for spring selection for both front and rear but springs are easily changed. I had to work with Jamie to get a setup that suited the CBR500 best and I sent the shock back once for a longer canister hose for easy mounting (see picture in my post).

To learn more about suspension check out the internet. One good site is Racetech. Here is their excellent explanation (with pictures) of fork damping - Emulators-How They Work.

Also, check my first post for a good price on a full package that works for the CBR500. Springs would be good if you are in the 140-180 lb range.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Suspension components are sold.
 

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I am curious how did you determine which is the best front/rear shock as a replacement to stock ones? I have CBR '16 model, and admittedly don't know almost anything about mechanical parts, but I am also looking to replace stock suspension, and wondering which route to go.
Do a GIS search for: “Shock Swap Myth by Peter Kates GMD Computrack.”
 

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Ohlins offers their STX-46 shock absorber for the 2013-14 model CB-500F, but nothing for my 2017. Can anyone comment on this re interchangeability or whether there is a good replacement shock for the '17? I weigh only 135# and the OEM shock is pounding me to Jell-O. I did reduce the spring preload as much as possible. Still way too stiff and I'd really prefer a top shelf shock than meddle with the OEM unit. Thanks..

Ralph
 

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Ralph

I weigh 140 lbs and have a 2014 C500F (non-ABS). The stock shock was not sophisticated but didn't pound me badly unless the pavement was really abrupt. Spring was well suited to my weight.

I did replace it with one from a 2017 GSXR600, much better. Paid about $40 on eBay. This shock only fits in non-ABS bikes, don't know about 2016-2018 model years.
Shock from GSXR before 2010 model year may raise the rear of our bike more than recent ones.

The first post in this thread describes replacing shock with a rebuilt, re-sprung shock from a Honda CBR600F4. Many people have done this. Very likely the person who does the rebuilds can say if it fits the '17.

I wonder if there is a problem with the stock shock on your bike? You could buy a take-off on eBay for a few dollars if you want to try another stock one.

If the rear of the bike was lowered, that affects spring and shock rates. Don't know how much.
 

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I weigh only 135# and the OEM shock is pounding me to Jell-O. I did reduce the spring preload as much as possible.

Also try running lower rear tire pressures. Say 37 psi rear unless you carry a passenger and luggage all the time.
 

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I have an Ohlin's on my 2015 CB500F, I would call Ohlin's USA and ask them about your 2017, I bet it fits. There are also other companies making good shocks out there, maybe find a suspension shop near you and ask them what's available. I use GMD Computrack Atlanta.
 

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Hi Guys,

I don't want to start a new thread, so I will use this one as the title fits ... I am finally considering upgrading the suspension on my 2015 R (I'm not counting the aftermarket preload adjusters and correctly set up sag front and rear), mainly because it seems like I will keep the bike as long as possible and I started to ride more tracks, with some luggage and with my girlfriend on the back. The stock suspension was too soft as it was, but now it suffers even more.

From what I gathered and if I remember correctly, the stock spring rate on the front is progressive from 0.6 to 1.0 kg/mm and the rear is linear 10.7 kg/mm that should be from 5.9 N/mm to 9.8 N/mm for the front and 105 N/mm for the rear.

As mentioned above, my riding consists of twisty roads for fun, highways with backpack on the rear seat, girlfriend on the rear seat and track riding a few times a year, currently I am about 85 kg (187 lbs) with gear (I dropped about 7 kg in the last year and a half), backpack ... let's say about 20 kg (44 lbs) if it is fully loaded and girlfriend ... that's not polite to say, but let's assume, that with gear it will be less than 75 kg (165 lbs).

The Forks
I am deciding between:
Honda CBR500 (Race Version) Andreani Fork Cartridge Kit (13)
and
Front Fork Cartridges 20IDS Honda CBR500R 2013> Showa

I am more inclined to the Andreani, but from what I have gathered they spec usually softer springs than everyone would expect, I played with the racetech calculator (RT - Digital Product Search) and it recommends something between 0.9 and 0.95 kg/mm, I've read that racetech gives a slightly higher values, so the Andreani could be right, but there is no knowing until I have them installed.

The Shock
I am mainly considering this YSS shock: Honda CB500FA YSS Shock Absorber (13-16) it has spring rate defined as 120 N/mm, there is also "R" version (Honda CBR500 R/F YSS Shock Absorber (13-16)) with a spring rate of 100 N/mm, but that is basically the same as stock bike, no idea why they have them as separate products as they are identical except the spring rate (maybe that's the reason). I briefly considered also the high / low compression version (https://www.yss.co.th/product-detail.php?id=10142&cat=shock&vehicle_type=1&brand=11&model=2099&year=2013&keyword=&page=1) but that would be a pain to get here and from what I saw, I can almost get front and back for that price, plus the front does not have high and low, so that would be probably pointless.
Another alternative would be ktech: https://store.ktechsuspension.com/shock-absorber-razor-rr-honda-cbr500rr-264s-016-130-010.html with 120 N/mm spring as well, but that is again a bit more expensive than the YSS for the same functionality.

I understand that all the springs can be changed later on if they do not fit, but why not to get it right the first time?

So my question now is ... what do you guys think? (also I did considered the old cbr 600 f shock, but I was having a hard time finding anything worth + after shipping, servicing and spend time, it's probably just easier to get a new one anyway)
 

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Hi Guys,

I don't want to start a new thread, so I will use this one as the title fits ... I am finally considering upgrading the suspension on my 2015 R (I'm not counting the aftermarket preload adjusters and correctly set up sag front and rear), mainly because it seems like I will keep the bike as long as possible and I started to ride more tracks, with some luggage and with my girlfriend on the back. The stock suspension was too soft as it was, but now it suffers even more.

From what I gathered and if I remember correctly, the stock spring rate on the front is progressive from 0.6 to 1.0 kg/mm and the rear is linear 10.7 kg/mm that should be from 5.9 N/mm to 9.8 N/mm for the front and 105 N/mm for the rear.

As mentioned above, my riding consists of twisty roads for fun, highways with backpack on the rear seat, girlfriend on the rear seat and track riding a few times a year, currently I am about 85 kg (187 lbs) with gear (I dropped about 7 kg in the last year and a half), backpack ... let's say about 20 kg (44 lbs) if it is fully loaded and girlfriend ... that's not polite to say, but let's assume, that with gear it will be less than 75 kg (165 lbs).

The Forks
I am deciding between:
Honda CBR500 (Race Version) Andreani Fork Cartridge Kit (13)
and
Front Fork Cartridges 20IDS Honda CBR500R 2013> Showa

I am more inclined to the Andreani, but from what I have gathered they spec usually softer springs than everyone would expect, I played with the racetech calculator (RT - Digital Product Search) and it recommends something between 0.9 and 0.95 kg/mm, I've read that racetech gives a slightly higher values, so the Andreani could be right, but there is no knowing until I have them installed.

The Shock
I am mainly considering this YSS shock: Honda CB500FA YSS Shock Absorber (13-16) it has spring rate defined as 120 N/mm, there is also "R" version (Honda CBR500 R/F YSS Shock Absorber (13-16)) with a spring rate of 100 N/mm, but that is basically the same as stock bike, no idea why they have them as separate products as they are identical except the spring rate (maybe that's the reason). I briefly considered also the high / low compression version (HONDA CBR 500 R) but that would be a pain to get here and from what I saw, I can almost get front and back for that price, plus the front does not have high and low, so that would be probably pointless.
Another alternative would be ktech: Shock Absorber -Razor-RR Honda CBR500RR with 120 N/mm spring as well, but that is again a bit more expensive than the YSS for the same functionality.

I understand that all the springs can be changed later on if they do not fit, but why not to get it right the first time?

So my question now is ... what do you guys think? (also I did considered the old cbr 600 f shock, but I was having a hard time finding anything worth + after shipping, servicing and spend time, it's probably just easier to get a new one anyway)
Hello neighbor, long time no see.
So if I understand f
Correctly, your usage requirement is mainly street, with significant time spent with the significant other, and a few occasional trackdays.
A lot depends on your specific riding style, and suspension preference, but for the front I'd definitely would not install a stiffer than 8.5N/mm spring
for the front. For the rear I'm the same weight as you, and even on the L2 500x what has 170mm travel compared to the 120mm of the F and R (this means that the leverage is larger on the X so the spring is working harder) 110N/mm spring is close to perfect. However as I said above choosing spring rates is very much down to preference. As long as you can reach adequate rider sag without excess preload and still have some static sag, you're good. As a reference, I've installed 7.8N/mm springs and cartridge emulators on the bike of a friend at 110kg for street riding, and he is a happy camper. Remember, that you want to have soft enough springs to absorb bumps for good road compliance, and can use slow compression damping to support the forks for slow speed events like breaking and acceleration to provide stability, don't have to install overly heavy springs. Albeit the slow and fast compression are not separately adjustable externally, but with some tweaking they can be adjusted. Practically increasing fork fluid viscosity will adjust total compression damping, while adjusting comp adjuster will change bleed ( or bypass) what is more of an adjustment of slow speed. So if you're after stronger slow speed and lighter fast compression - you use thinner oil, but and close on the comp adjuster. Good thing is, that comp and rebound are on different legs, making them completely separate. The ultimate is to get the shim stack rebuilt, but that's a bigger project.
As for cartridge manufacturers I would consider Matris and Mupo also. Both stuff are top notch. The Matris uses an interesting design, thus the fork stanchions does not need to be modified. Mupo on the other hand uses 22mm cartridges (all else are 20mm) what makes those a bit better than the rest. I know a few racers who went from Andreani to Mupo and very happy with the results.
For the rear I'd add Mupo, Hagon, Wilbers to your list of potential manufacturers. All make solid stuff, and unlike YSS they can provide completely custom spring rates specific to your weight. Keep in mind, that the difference between your track and (yourself only) and touring setup (you, better half, luggage) there is a two times multiplier, so rear spring rate will be a strong compromise. I'd suggest to analyze your habits and what is your main preference and select the spring rate accordingly. While the front is less sensitive to change of load, and preload settings are easily accesible, the rear preload adjustment is a major pita - so I'd definitely consider swallowing the cost of a remote preload adjuster. Also some naufacturers ég Wilbers offer option for adjustable length, or increased suspension stroke. As the 500nis a bit of a piggy at the track and starts dragging vital parts very early altering geometry by raising the forks is out of the question - so an adjustable length shock or a slightly higher shock for raising the rear will be very very handy.
Juat my two cents, hope it doesn't leave you more confused than before.
If you want to discuss this further, I'm happy to take it offline. PM me if interested and I can send you mh email/or phone to follow-up.
 

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Good reading with an insight to suspension. I have a Hagon shock on the rear, made to measure but I am only 2 1/2 hours away. Two year warranty, and a full rebuild with new stainless piston rod is a hundred pounds. For me the front is soft on large travel undulations, but harsh on short travel undulations. Time for a spring change I think.
 

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hi @Oyabun
yes, it's been a while since I have done something with the bike, but I have been posting from time to time and reading if I found something interesting ;)

Don't worry, you didn't confused me, but you had some interesting points, that changed my view a bit, so I'm glad for that.

I checked the brands you suggested and I would like to avoid modification if possible, so I will probably go with a drop-in replacement for the forks. For the shock, a remote preload adjuster would be indeed nice and I saw some options for that on the yss shocks that can be bought additionally (https://www.yss.co.th/downloads/Installation-Manual-Hydraulic-Preload-Adjuster.pdf), so that would be an option.

With the current setup for the correct sag I was at 7 on the rear shock if i remember correctly, because of the girlfriend I have put it on max (9 if I remember correctly) and the bike still sits like a duck when we are both on, don't get me wrong, it doesn't handle that bad, but max preload setting is probably not a good indicator :) Of course I am aware that the rear shock will be a huge compromise with solo / loaded riding, but i'm fine with that.

What I will do (just so others know), is I will contact you via PM and we can have a call or something to discuss this when you have time, after that I will post here the result when I am ready to order something and do a short write up once I have everything installed and tested :)
 

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Sent my contacts via pm, feel free to contact me whenever fits your agenda. BTW, we're like 170kms from each other at worst, we could even meet up for a coffee half way ;-)
Also don't know how you'd like to get the suspension stuff installed, but I have a pretty decent garage and workshop at home, so happy to help out with the install if needed.
 

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Good reading with an insight to suspension. I have a Hagon shock on the rear, made to measure but I am only 2 1/2 hours away. Two year warranty, and a full rebuild with new stainless piston rod is a hundred pounds. For me the front is soft on large travel undulations, but harsh on short travel undulations. Time for a spring change I think.
Indeed Hagon is great. I've ran one of their shocks on my wifey's CB500F. Well made stuff.
What you're feeling is actually more related to damping rather than spring rate - with caveats.
So it is slightly related to oem springs as they are dual rate, and will change over to a much stronger spring rate at about 75-80% of total travel, depending on preload.
But what you feel is mainly damping related, and shows the limitation of the stock damper rods. Simple orifice damping has tgis characteristics of being vague at small or slow movements, and being harsh on big ones. That's why more sophisticated damping methods separate slow and fast suspension action, and providing firmness on slow movements, and soak up big bumps at the same time.
There are great articles available at racetech's website explaining the physics and solutions of this.
 
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