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Throttle control on the street. Something i've been struggling to manage and master. I find less than perfectly smooth roads to cause problems for me, rough and bumpy rides! I try to keep a light grip, still learning to improve on this, and having minimal throttle play (2-3mm currently) does help a little, but a small bump in the road and the bike is jerky. I feel perhaps the suspension is not helping with this particular issue nor the "on" and "off" feeling of the throttle response itself, even when trying to be REALLY smooth on application, or maybe (more likely) I just suck at this and need to really focus on what I'm doing.


Although this does make me think, riding a motorcycle shouldnt feel like "work" it should be enjoyable, but recently I can't help but focus on the negatives on my 2015 CB500F. The rides just feel shitty for lack of a better word.


Considering having alot of throttle slack to see if this improves things, at least in my mind it should help with smoother throttle roll ons and with bumpy roads.
 

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You don't need a lot of play in the throttle. It won't help and may cause problems. My recommendation to you would be to go up one tooth on the front sprocket (I have a video for that mod in the tech section). You can also shift earlier in the rev range to reduce jerkiness. You needn't do anything more than that to improve your experience.

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Jerky/bumpy response to on/off throttle can be caused by a worn cush drive in the rear hub. It is a rubber "cushion" that absorbs the jerkiness transmitted from the sprocket to the rear wheel. I needed to change mine at about 25000 miles..
 

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You don't need a lot of play in the throttle. It won't help and may cause problems. My recommendation to you would be to go up one tooth on the front sprocket (I have a video for that mod in the tech section). You can also shift earlier in the rev range to reduce jerkiness. You needn't do anything more than that to improve your experience.
Bunk! Unless you have 1/2" of throttle play you may have a problem. But throttle play, within reason, will definitely help with your throttle jerkiness.

I agree with his recommendation of a larger front sprocket. However this only adds a little help (proportionally). Upshifting earlier is also good, but probably won't help much either.

Best is to live with it, and just keep practicing at your throttle/clutch/shifting method and you will get better and be much more satisfied.
 

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It's a common thing for many bikes with riders finding the small throttle openings hard to manage with small wrist movements.
One method to address this is to fit a Throttle Tamer. The cam is non-linear, having a larger diameter when you first get in the throttle; helps to me more precise control in those smaller throttle openings.

https://youtu.be/6r6W62-Ugts
 

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I have noticed this jerkiness since first getting the bike in 2016. Like many things I have learned to compensate & deal with it. It only comes into play with tiny throttle openings at low speeds. I have learned to not chop the throttle & keep the gas on in these situations. Hardly ever happens to me now. Stock bike w/ stock gearing.
 

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I don't want anyone getting hurt so let me just circle back on my remark about throttle free play. To be clear, if you have more than the recommended range of free play you're going to be dealing with a safety issue. This isn't my opinion. This is a fact and it's serious business. Don't listen to people offering opinions about opinions. Look at this video. Skip to 1:01 and see how these mechanical parts function and then you can happily ignore the people who might get you hurt if you listen to them.
https://youtu.be/mDMcAGlDJjw

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Just some info. There are those on here who get bent way out of shape when someone disagrees with them. If you don't accept their "advice" they go zonkers!
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It is true that putting TOO MUCH slack in the cable(s) could cause a problem. But we're not talking about that much. Use REASON - just make sure neither cable is so slack that it could "jump" the rails or in some way unhook from the cable spool and you will be fine.

All that is needed in extra slack - just enough to allow your initial hand movement to affect the throttle plate.
 

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Just some info. There are those on here who get bent way out of shape when someone disagrees with them. If you don't accept their "advice" they go zonkers!

-

It is true that putting TOO MUCH slack in the cable(s) could cause a problem. But we're not talking about that much. Use REASON - just make sure neither cable is so slack that it could "jump" the rails or in some way unhook from the cable spool and you will be fine.



All that is needed in extra slack - just enough to allow your initial hand movement to affect the throttle plate.
...And there are some who will recklessly call a reasonable safety warning, "bunk!"
Dude, people wouldn't have to circle back if you weren't doing stuff like that. We aren't sensitive, we just don't want your ego causing some new rider to have a bad day.
FWIW, thank you for correcting yourself above. I do appreciate that.

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AND keep your wrists and arms loose. Dont tense up.
You should be able to ride out the bumps with your arms taking the movement and your hand holding on.
Also what kind of roads do you have that they are that bumpy?
 

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...And there are some who will recklessly call a reasonable safety warning, "bunk!"
Dude, people wouldn't have to circle back if you weren't doing stuff like that. We aren't sensitive, we just don't want your ego causing some new rider to have a bad day.
FWIW, thank you for correcting yourself above. I do appreciate that.

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Just to keep the record straight.

1) I did not correct myself at all. I just more narrowly defined what I said because people like you purposely take stuff like this to extremes. My original post would not have caused anyone to have "a bad day," when used with reason.

2) NOTHING I say on here or anywhere else is due to "ego." Maybe that's the way you make your remarks, but not me - ever. My remarks are made on 55 years of experience riding and working in motorcycle shops and on literally hundreds of cycles and cars. When I don't think I have anything to offer, I remain silent.

3) My original disagreement with your post was your comment, "You don't need a lot of play in the throttle. It won't help and may cause problems." This is patently false that it won't help. A little extra free play keeps some of the movement of the handlebar throttle movement away from the intake throttle movement. It takes some the "sensitive" throttle up/down to a minimum.!
 

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Just to keep the record straight.



1) I did not correct myself at all. I just more narrowly defined what I said because people like you purposely take stuff like this to extremes. My original post would not have caused anyone to have "a bad day," when used with reason.



2) NOTHING I say on here or anywhere else is due to "ego." Maybe that's the way you make your remarks, but not me - ever. My remarks are made on 55 years of experience riding and working in motorcycle shops and on literally hundreds of cycles and cars. When I don't think I have anything to offer, I remain silent.



3) My original disagreement with your post was your comment, "You don't need a lot of play in the throttle. It won't help and may cause problems." This is patently false that it won't help. A little extra free play keeps some of the movement of the handlebar throttle movement away from the intake throttle movement. It takes some the "sensitive" throttle up/down to a minimum.!
...And some people go zonkers...lol!

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A couple of notes from my experience:

It's often best to hold on with your legs/thighs instead of your arms. That will give you a lot more stability, and give you a lot more confidence. And when the road is rough like this you can really loosen your grip on the bars because you're already holding on with your legs. Your hands/arms are just for operating the controls and not for "holding on". It can feel a bit hard to hold on tight enough at first, particularly if you're not in gymrat shape (who is?!), but you do get used to it.

Aside from that, note that the engine prefers to rev 4000+ RPM. At less than 4000 you can expect some extra jerkiness because the engine isn't producing much power. If you look at the power and torque curves for this engine it starts out quite low and gradually climbs. It makes the most power in the high end shortly before red-line. At 3500 RPM, based on some random power/torque curve images on Google, the engine is only making about 15 hp. At 4000 RPM, it's closer to 22 hp. The really sweet spot is between 5000 and 8000 RPM. Note: it gets loud, and it vibrates a lot, at that range, but it's safe for the engine.

Some people are trying to maximize the fuel economy, or are just afraid of the bike because they're new to riding (as they should be!), and keep the revs really low. This can cause jerkiness when you apply the throttle. See if increasing the revs helps (balance it with the clutch so you remain in control, of course; practice in a safe environment if you're new to riding). This isn't a race bike so you don't need to be paranoid about applying some throttle. It has plenty to kill you, but you have to be trying pretty hard to do it. It's not like a race bike that could kill you with too much twist. The 500 will pretty much just grumble and move you fast if you grab a lot of throttle (avoid leaning way back I guess...).
 

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Hey, had the same issue when I got my 500F. I don't know how big your hands are, but I find the throttle to be really tiny (at least compared to my previous bike - Sportster). I fitted some Grip Puppies and it's a lot easier now to tweak the throttle where I want it. They're cheap - might be worth looking into.
 

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Throttle control on the street. Something i've been struggling to manage and master. I find less than perfectly smooth roads to cause problems for me, rough and bumpy rides! I try to keep a light grip, still learning to improve on this, and having minimal throttle play (2-3mm currently) does help a little, but a small bump in the road and the bike is jerky. I feel perhaps the suspension is not helping with this particular issue nor the "on" and "off" feeling of the throttle response itself, even when trying to be REALLY smooth on application, or maybe (more likely) I just suck at this and need to really focus on what I'm doing.
Practice, practice, practice my friend. Master the bike!

Although this does make me think, riding a motorcycle shouldnt feel like "work" it should be enjoyable, but recently I can't help but focus on the negatives on my 2015 CB500F. The rides just feel shitty for lack of a better word.
My CB500F runs super smoothly. It really gets me to smiling every time I ride this baby.

Considering having alot of throttle slack to see if this improves things, at least in my mind it should help with smoother throttle roll ons and with bumpy roads.
Maybe you are putting petroleum on the bike instead of the best gasoline available. :grin:
 
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