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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello all,

Today I bought the tricolor 500r and will pick it up on Tuesday! I'm trading in my Ninja 250, which was great, but I'm tired of going through all 6 gears to get to 40mph. Thought about getting a supersport but I can think of more reasons to stick with a lesser powered bike (high insurance, maint. costs, fact that it's meant for racing and not public roads).

Anyway, I went to a dealership and they let me test ride the 2012 Yamaha FZ6R in an effort to get me to buy that instead of the 500r. The power was all there, comfortable, but the bike weighs nearly 500 lbs and the headlights look stupid IMO.

Now I'm afraid of being under-whelmed by the power of the 500r after I got a taste of an in-line 4 with the FZ6R. Can anyone who has ridden the FZ6R or the Ninja 650r give me an idea of power comparisons? Obviously the 500r has less horsepower but is the difference that great? Thanks for any insight!

Oh, and I was going to get the all black 500r but once I saw the tricolor in person I decided it looks 10x better than in the pictures!
 

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Yes, the GIXXER and Kawa are much more noticeably powerful. No comparison at all. The GIXXER especially. Don't expect the 500r to be mind blowing. It's a great bike, fun and nimble. Will do freeway speeds effortlessly but definately not an SS.,
 

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Oh, and I was going to get the all black 500r but once I saw the tricolor in person I decided it looks 10x better than in the pictures!
I couldn't agree more.
I am waiting a month, just to get my hands on a white one.
Dealer has a red one. I said, NOPE. White or nothing!
:D
 

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I actually sold my 2009 Yamaha FZ6R to get the CBR500r and am totally happy with it. It's a noticeable step down in power but the 500 still has plenty to keep things fun around the city. I actually prefer the 500 for the highway as it is spinning around 5600rpm at 120km/hr and the FZ6R is spinning @ 7000prm which is right where the bike has an annoying buzzy spot in the RPM range.

The ergos are almost identical between the two bikes so you'll find them both to be very comfortable but again the 500 gets better mpgs and is lighter. Plus if you want ABS (which I think is one of those things that you hope you'll never use but if you do you'll be glad you have it) you're out of luck as Yamaha doesn't have it available on the FZ6R.
 

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Plus if you want ABS (which I think is one of those things that you hope you'll never use but if you do you'll be glad you have it) you're out of luck as Yamaha doesn't have it available on the FZ6R.
ABS can be a bad thing for a new rider.
The reason is: a squid can grab a handful of front brake, and the ABS will stop the bike.
The squid will never learn proper brake control. The ABS will do all the work.
Now, squid gets on his friends bike ( without ABS ) and takes off.
Comes to a stop sign and grabs a handful of front brake expecting to stop.
Front wheel locks up... bike dumps and slides. Squid is shocked.
How did that happen? It never happened on his bike!

See my point?
I don't want ABS. I want to learn proper brake control.

:cool:
 

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I haven't ridden an FZ6R, but my old Nighthawk S weighs in at 80 horses, and I'm not going to miss the power. The 500R delivers plenty of punch for everyday use as well as weekend fun, and it delivers that power reasonably well throughout most of the rpm range. It also handles very, very well. I might end up feeling like a slow poke on the track, but on the streets I have to keep it reined in to avoid getting any performance awards from my friendly LEOs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'm not expecting it to be some kind of beast, I just hope I will stay satisfied with it for the next year or so. And judging by the responses I think I will be OK. It's difficult to resist getting a supersport when you know its something you definitely don't need (if you can say you would "need" any motorcycle at all) but the idea of it is cool and everyone around you acts like you must have one (I'm in the Army and every joe schmoe and their mother has a 600cc+ bike).

As far as the ABS, I wouldn't spend the extra money to get it....I just ride competently enough so that I'm not in situations where I would desperately need it.
 

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everyone around you acts like you must have one (I'm in the Army and every joe schmoe and their mother has a 600cc+ bike).
If they are young, and don't mind riding stretched-out across a giant gas tank... more power to them.
I want to ride in a more comfortable position, and I can get a speeding ticket on a CBR500R just as fast as I could on a CBR1000RR.
( And I can be more comfortable while getting that ticket! ) ( And I might have some money left over to PAY that ticket! )
:D
 

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ABS can be a bad thing for a new rider.
The reason is: a squid can grab a handful of front brake, and the ABS will stop the bike.
The squid will never learn proper brake control. The ABS will do all the work.
Now, squid gets on his friends bike ( without ABS ) and takes off.
Comes to a stop sign and grabs a handful of front brake expecting to stop.
Front wheel locks up... bike dumps and slides. Squid is shocked.
How did that happen? It never happened on his bike!

See my point?
I don't want ABS. I want to learn proper brake control.

:cool:
I don't see your point, a squid gets a bike without abs brakes and learns how to brake properly, then gets on a different bike also without ABS, how does he know when the different brand of tires will brake loose and loose traction, pro's outperform ABS, but that is always on a course with a few tries, and the same road conditions and surface on the attempts they make. I know you can get good at braking, but does anybody know every kind of road surface, and how their tires react to all the types of roads when wet and when dry. There are many different types of asphalt and concrete, and I cant practice on everyone dry and wet to figure out the limits of my tires on them, plus ride every bike made to get the feel of there tires and pressure needed on the brakes needed to come to a panic stop. Proper braking is important, but my guess would be that more accidents happen during panic stops on their own bikes, than ones on a barrowed bike.
 

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ABS can be a bad thing for a new rider.
The reason is: a squid can grab a handful of front brake, and the ABS will stop the bike.
The squid will never learn proper brake control. The ABS will do all the work.
Now, squid gets on his friends bike ( without ABS ) and takes off.
Comes to a stop sign and grabs a handful of front brake expecting to stop.
Front wheel locks up... bike dumps and slides. Squid is shocked.
How did that happen? It never happened on his bike!

See my point?
I don't want ABS. I want to learn proper brake control.

:cool:
Not even professional riders can out-perform ABS brakes on wet or sandy roads. Proper brake control is important but why wouldn't you want to stack the odds in your favor should you ever need to do a panic stop.
 

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Hello all,

Anyway, I went to a dealership and they let me test ride the 2012 Yamaha FZ6R in an effort to get me to buy that instead of the 500r. The power was all there, comfortable, but the bike weighs nearly 500 lbs and the headlights look stupid IMO.
I haven't rode the FZ6R or Ninja 650, but I can say moving up from a Ninja 250r to the CBR500r that the relatively lack of weight is a nice feature. The bike (CBR500r) is particularly nimble around town and your typical twisty backroads. Feels very narrow and easy to turn and move around. One reason I had no consideration for a cruiser or 'sport-touring' type motorcycle, 600+ pounds can be miserable to lug around. Especially at a stop light or in a parking lot where you need to lug the thing around.

There is something to be said about lightweight with 'just enough' power to be entertaining and interesting. Also seat height is a huge factor for me, I'm only 5'7" and I have a difficult to getting most supersports off their side stand. 32+ inch seat heights were fairly prohibitive when I was looking. Not sure how much of a factor that was in your decision, but 31 some inches and thin seat towards the front makes the bike easier to keep upright, especially in strong wind conditions.
 
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