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Label: 5W/40

The first bracket of info on the label is the viscosity or 'weight' of an oil. When you see a W on a viscosity rating (The first bracket of info on a label) it means that this oil viscosity has been tested at a Colder temperature, aka: Winter Viscosity. A lower rating means it'll flow faster through the engine during initial ignition at start up. So lower is better. But once the engine gets up to normal running temps (approx. 100C) this rating soon becomes irrelevant.

The second bracket of info is about how long the oil will remain within working temps. 30 is fine for colder / most climates, 40 is better for hotter climates. And by climates, I also mean internal engine temperatures. So a 40 graded oil means it'll protect the engine at higher running temps (100C) better then a 30. If you live in Australia, or ride quite aggressively, then maybe think about a higher graded oil.
Just going back to this because you referred to it. If this is your understanding than it is fundamentally wrong and it's no wonder you can't wrap your head around how it works. The first number is the oil viscosity rating when tested cold. (aka "Winter viscosity"). The second is the oil viscosity rating when tested at 100c. They both measure the same thing at different temperatures. The AMSOil article you linked to explains this, as does the article I linked to. The oil viscosity changes as it gets hotter.

If you expect to run at outside temperatures that are so extreme that you would cause your engine to run at abnormally high or low temperatures, then you might want to adjust the oil viscosity you choose up and down. The reality of riding is that we all tend to do it in a fairly narrow range of temperatures and modern water-cooled engines with thermostatically activated cooling fans and other neat gadgets are really good at keeping internal operating temperatures quite consistent when riding within the engines normal operating envelope and most people's riding temperature tolerances. There was a time when all engines suffered from the effects of outside temperature and driving/riding style. Today, unless you're really riding at the extremes, these factors are pretty negligible in terms of the effect on the internal operating temperatures of the engine, which is why I don't worry about changing oil grades in different seasons, etc. You used to have to think about this stuff a lot. Today you really don't and lots of people overthink it.
 

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Just going back to this because you referred to it. If this is your understanding than it is fundamentally wrong and it's no wonder you can't wrap your head around how it works. The first number is the oil viscosity rating when tested cold. (aka "Winter viscosity"). The second is the oil viscosity rating when tested at 100c. They both measure the same thing at different temperatures. The AMSOil article you linked to explains this, as does the article I linked to. The oil viscosity changes as it gets hotter.

If you expect to run at outside temperatures that are so extreme that you would cause your engine to run at abnormally high or low temperatures, then you might want to adjust the oil viscosity you choose up and down. The reality of riding is that we all tend to do it in a fairly narrow range of temperatures and modern water-cooled engines with thermostatically activated cooling fans and other neat gadgets are really good at keeping internal operating temperatures quite consistent when riding within the engines normal operating envelope and most people's riding temperature tolerances. There was a time when all engines suffered from the effects of outside temperature and driving/riding style. Today, unless you're really riding at the extremes, these factors are pretty negligible in terms of the effect on the internal operating temperatures of the engine, which is why I don't worry about changing oil grades in different seasons, etc. You used to have to think about this stuff a lot. Today you really don't and lots of people overthink it.
Learned something new, thanks.
 

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Same. Thanks for that.

There is conflicting info on forums and sometimes that's hard to navigate. Thanks again.
 

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Most of the stuff you read on forums about oil is old wives tails and made up notions. I linked to the guy at California Sciences because it's one of the best articles about this. He's also done some decent "cut em open" oil filter reviews, but mostly focused on the Suzuki filter size, which is an oddball one.
 

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I run Motul 300v 10w/40. Change it every 4000 miles. Costly, but worth it. I'd personally do an oil change every 4k miles, with a great synthetic after the first 4k miles. I'm probably reiterating sh*t, but whatever.
 

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The pepper's not the only thing cracked! :)
 

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Hello to all

my cb500f is coming near her 3rd service interval and i was looking which oil i can use instead the Honda synthetic based 10w-30. first of all i would like to use a 10W-40 instead, since in my country don't suffer low temp plus that is summer gets really hot..well practically is summer all year

anyway the best so far that i found is the silkolene comp 4 10w-40 synthetic ester
API SG, SH & SJ, JASO MA2

Second
silkolene super 4 10w-40 semi-synthetic
API SF & SG, JASO MA2

which one do you think is best?

i will look to castrol and motul but i think silkolene is not bad at all

any thoughts?

regards
 

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Hello to all

my cb500f is coming near her 3rd service interval and i was looking which oil i can use instead the Honda synthetic based 10w-30. first of all i would like to use a 10W-40 instead, since in my country don't suffer low temp plus that is summer gets really hot..well practically is summer all year

anyway the best so far that i found is the silkolene comp 4 10w-40 synthetic ester
API SG, SH & SJ, JASO MA2

Second
silkolene super 4 10w-40 semi-synthetic
API SF & SG, JASO MA2

which one do you think is best?

i will look to castrol and motul but i think silkolene is not bad at all

any thoughts?

regards
I will be trying Motul 300V 10W40 for my second oil change.

Hopefully everything runs smooth.

I live in CA where the weather doesn't drop below 40°F

Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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Oil sale

I just picked up Mobile 1 Racing 4T 10w40 at Salvo for $8 verse the normal $12. They told me it's on sale for the month. I plan to stock up!
 

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Reviving an old but good post. Anyone ever use Valvoline 10w40 4T Stroke synthetic? I've been using the Valvoline oil 10w40 non-synthetic motorcycle oil in my engine. Mostly because it's cheap and I tend to change my oil every 3k miles. But now it's getting hard to find it at the box store I normally get it at. It seems to fly off the shelves for 3.80 a quart. This is $5 more a quart, but is findable. Just looking for anyone who has used it and seeing how many miles they got out of it.

Also, i've been wondering if there is any real difference from specific branded motorcycle oil and any other type of oil for your car. I don't see what can be much different about oil.....

 

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Reviving an old but good post. Anyone ever use Valvoline 10w40 4T Stroke synthetic? I've been using the Valvoline oil 10w40 non-synthetic motorcycle oil in my engine. Mostly because it's cheap and I tend to change my oil every 3k miles. But now it's getting hard to find it at the box store I normally get it at. It seems to fly off the shelves for 3.80 a quart. This is $5 more a quart, but is findable. Just looking for anyone who has used it and seeing how many miles they got out of it.

Also, i've been wondering if there is any real difference from specific branded motorcycle oil and any other type of oil for your car. I don't see what can be much different about oil.....

So, um, why not just use the oil Honda recommends? You can't go wrong with good ol' GN4 10W-30 in this bike. At $6/qt. or $20/gal. on rocky mtn., why not get oil, a genuine Honda oil filter and a crush washer all at once. Order for a couple of changes and get free shipping.

Yes, there is a difference in motorcycle oil or car oil. Really, the thing that matters is meeting the JASO T 903 standard MA. Because our motorcycles use a wet clutch, meaning the clutch is "wet" from oil, so the oil needs to be modified to this specification so it doesn't harm, slip, ruin the clutch. So, don't use car oil or any "energy conserving" oil.

Finally, the recommended oil is a 10W-30, so why are you not using it? Multi-viscosity oil molecules increase in size from cold to engine operating temperature...the 30 weight molecules are smaller than 40 weight molecules at these operating temperatures. Operating temperatures, not ambient climate temperatures. The bigger 40 weight molecules may not be able get to all of the places where oil is supposed to get to in an engine built to tight tolerances and designed and engineered to use 10W-30. If it didn't matter, why would they bother to print it? If 10W-40 was okay, why wouldn't they say so, or print an old school ambient temperature chart like on an air cooled bike? They didn't, so it must matter regardless of how a different oil grade "feels" to a rider. Sure, it will not immediately cause catastrophic damage, but if you care about the longevity of your bike, you may want to follow the recommendations.

Check out this video where ericthecarguy speaks with representatives at Valvoline. The whole thing is a good watch, they talk about conventionals, synthetics, and blends, and @ 6:12-12:16 they speak to this issue of viscosity. Or, if you are super short on time, start at 10:20.

https://youtu.be/FXqkOZAkXZw
 

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I didn't think 10w-40 would hurt it at all. It seemed like a lot of people here were using it and the temp I live at it gets above 100 for months at a time it seems. But the manual does say 10w-30.

Looks like partzilla is cheaper. They are cheaper on most OEM parts it seems. Here is a link: http://www.partzilla.com/parts/detail/honda/HP-08C35-A131L02.html

$18.83 a gallon instead of $20. Same kind of thing, spend enough money free ship. But I ordered from rocky mntn before I noticed this price difference. I emailed rocky mntn to see if they will price match it. I'll update the post if they do.

Update: They did offer to give me a gift card price for the difference.
 

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So 40 weight has bigger molecules ???
When the outside temps are consistently hot, The 40 weight will lubricate the engine better than 30 weight.
That's why its listed as an oil to use.
Its not like your engine will blow up if you use 40 weight when the temps are lower.
you just have added lubrication ready for when the temps do go up.
When it not that hot outside you can use 30 weight.
Its just that simple.
And no oil is that much better than another.
As long as it meets the requirements listed any oil will work.
If it makes you 'feel good" use any oil you want.
You most likely wont have the bike long enough to reap the benefits of your oil choice anyway!
 
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