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Did you check with the bike leaning on it's kickstand, or did you stand it straight upright the way the owners manual says to? It's always going to read low if it's on the stand. If you filled it up to between the lines when it's leaning on the stand, then you seriously overfilled.

I suspect the guy sold you the most expensive appropriate oil he had available.
Straight upright.

I don't know oils, but I did read the manual. Good to see you adding to the conversation.

So apart from it being expensive, the question still stands: "is it the wrong type of oil for my bike?"

Based on a few other contributing responses in this thread, some use 5W/40 so I'm just going to ride it and see what happens.
 

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I'm pretty new to this owning a vehicle thing. I checked the oil window today and there was very little visible. So I went off to Super Cheap to see what I could find.

I bought Castrol Power 1 Racing, Fully Synthetic 5W-40 as that's what the clerk recommended (I told him the bike type, and he went tap tap tap on the computer and said 'buy this'). I drained the black sludge that was in there from the dealers 1st service (was maybe 2-3 litres) and poured in this stuff till it was sitting around the middle of the oil sight glass.

I don't really know what I'm doing.

I have bought 3 Honda OEM oil filters online, and the bike is currently stored away for 2 weeks so if this stuff is 'not ideal' then I'll drain it when I next see the bike and use a new OEM oil filter.

I ride in 30C+ temps, and live in Western Queensland where it doesn't get cold, only very hot. I have about 6000km on the clock, it is well and truly broken in, and I love my bike and want to get the best oil available to me, that would suit these conditions/bike.

Thanks guys.
Whereabouts are you living Rowan, pretty dry and dusty out there at the moment. The old which oil question can be complicated and mind numbing.

I would be keeping a very close eye on your air filter more than your oil if you are in any of the real dusty places.
 

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Whereabouts are you living Rowan, pretty dry and dusty out there at the moment. The old which oil question can be complicated and mind numbing.

I would be keeping a very close eye on your air filter more than your oil if you are in any of the real dusty places.
Will do Xch. It does get a bit dusty, but I'm not off road much.


I learnt about the ratings on oils tonight. I hope this helps someone. I know I needed it earlier today.

Try to only buy and use motorcycle labelled oil, and avoid anything labelled 'Energy / Resource Conserving'.

Label: 5W/40

The first bracket of info on the label is the viscosity or 'weight' of an oil. When you see a W on a viscosity rating (The first bracket of info on a label) it means that this oil viscosity has been tested at a Colder temperature, aka: Winter Viscosity. A lower rating means it'll flow faster through the engine during initial ignition at start up. So lower is better. But once the engine gets up to normal running temps (approx. 100C) this rating soon becomes irrelevant.

"I can't tell you how many times I have heard someone, usually an auto mechanic, say that they wouldn't use a 5W-30 motor oil because it is, "Too thin." Then they may use a 10W-30 or SAE 30 motor oil. At engine operating temperatures these oils are the same. The only time the 5W-30 oil is "thin" is at cold start up conditions where you need it to be "thin." (Motor Oil Viscosity Grades Explained in Layman's Terms)

The second bracket of info is about how long the oil will remain within working temps. 30 is fine for colder / most climates, 40 is better for hotter climates. And by climates, I also mean internal engine temperatures. So a 40 graded oil means it'll protect the engine at higher running temps (100C) better then a 30. If you live in Australia, or ride quite aggressively, then maybe think about a higher graded oil.



(picture stolen from Netrider)


The general vibe on the type of oil? Most people advise to try and run a mineral oil during break in period and maybe a few thousand kilometres after that period, but to then switch to a semi or full synthetic oil. It seems to be a popular move, and I'm not sure why. I will keep reading about this.


I could be wrong about all of this stuff. But I thought I would contribute what I have learned today which I didn't know yesterday. So I'm going to monitor my progress with this oil, which should be fine.
 

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I have been using this in my other bikes for a while now with no problems, and it has given quieter running and smooth shifting. Still just running what the shop is putting in until out of warranty on the X.

Penrite RACING 15 15W-50 (100% PAO ESTER)
 

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I asked my local mechanic this very question 3yrs ago(for my 1st. bike) and his answer was. If your bike has a wet clutch, DON'T use energy saving oil, brand and oil for motorcycles is personal preference. Make sure you check oil level regularly(top up if need be), DO NOT over fill, and change it as required by manufacture. Change oil filter every 2nd oil change. I think this has more to do with the rider's disposable income than motorcycle requirements.
 

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I read that changing the oil without changing the oil filter is like reusing a condom.

Change your oil filter at the same time. Honda OEM filters are $20 on eBay.

But what do I know?
 

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You've got to be pretty tight to not change the filter with every oil change. OEM filters for me are $12 delivered, but I don't live on the other side of the world. I read on another web site that the Walmart brand oil filters are pretty good. It was a site where the guy cuts open filters (new and used) and compares them. It wasn't bobistheoilguy.com, but another one like it. I might try a $3 Walmart filter next time.
 

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Straight upright.

I don't know oils, but I did read the manual. Good to see you adding to the conversation.

So apart from it being expensive, the question still stands: "is it the wrong type of oil for my bike?"

Based on a few other contributing responses in this thread, some use 5W/40 so I'm just going to ride it and see what happens.
The grade of the oil is perfectly fine. a 10-30 will theoretically be a bit more efficient, which is why manufacturers tend towards lighter oils in their specifications, but there's nothing wrong with a 5w-40, which is what I'll be using going forward.

I asked if you checked with the bike upright because these bikes don't seem to burn much oil when they're operating properly, so if you saw significant oil consumption there could be other issues. At least one person here has had that kind of problem, but don't recall what the resolution was. (I suspected a bad or badly installed valve seal.)
 

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I think I've posted this before. Everything you might want to know about oil. It's a couple of years old so a few of the specific brands mentioned are outdated but the information is not.

All About Motor Oil

One important point buried in here is that all things being equal, a 10w-40 oil will break down faster than a 10w-30 oil. If you're using 10w-40, you probably don't want to push things all the way to Honda's recommended oil change limits. Change it more frequently. Motorcycle transmissions can really break down multigrade oils rather quickly.

But more to the point. Relax and don't overthink this!

"I get a lot of email, 'My buddy has 283,000 miles on his Yamazuki 867 Nintruder, and he's never used anything but 35¢ per quart grocery store oil changed every 48,000 miles.' Here's the truth: modern Japanese engines are amazingly well engineered and can tolerate a surprising amount of abuse...

"Your engine will not explode if you use Spiffo-Magic Superlube for 4,000 miles. Your engine will not explode if you never use synthetic oils. However, any of these choices puts additional strain on your engine. You buy $65 tires for your car that last 45,000 miles, and $100 tires for your bike that last 8,000 miles. Why on earth would you try to save $5 on each oil change to buy an oil that can't hold up in a motorcycle engine? My DL650 runs its oil through the transmission, I run off-road (extreme environment due to silicon blow-by at the piston rings), I'm pretty much always revving my engine at 5500 rpm or more (red line on the Corvette, the one that comes with Mobil-1 as factory fill). I stress my little engine enough without making it use dinner candles as lubricants. Nor do I wish to make the bearings run in 10w-40 oil that's broken down to 10w-15 oil.

Some people should, in my opinion, clearly use a synthetic oil. You should be using a synthetic if:

* you routinely start your engine in temperatures under 40°f, 5°c.
* you live somewhere where it gets below -35 degrees, and you want to start your car. In this case you must use either Mobil-1 0w-30 or the Canadian 0w-40 Rotella. If you're riding your bike in -40 degrees, I want a picture just before you die.
* you leave your vehicle sit unused for months at a time.
* you are unable or unwilling to change your oil within 2000 miles.
* you have one of these new 4-stroke MX bikes. These MX bikes hold only about one quart of oil, all of them have marginal cooling systems, and if there's a more severe use of an engine than MX, I don't want to be physically present when it happens.

If it's below -55c, -65f, stay home. Really."
 
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Just so I understand, in the brief 'article' I wrote about 40 being more versatile then 30, and better for higher engine / environment running temperatures. And that a 5W rating will spread through the engine better then a 10.

So this 5/40 oil might be a better oil but it breaks down quicker / doesn't have the lifespan and ceases to be as afficient as a 10/30? That's why it's a 'racing oil' because it's expected that you'll be changing the oil more often.

[Mod note, I accidentally edited this post. I think it's back to where it was originally. I shouldn't be doing this while working. Sorry - MichaelInVenice]
 

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Just so I understand, in the brief 'article' I wrote about 40 being more versatile then 30, and better for higher engine / environment running temperatures. And that a 5W rating will spread through the engine better then a 10.

So this 5/40 oil might be a better oil...
Depends. "Better" for what?

but it breaks down quicker / doesn't have the lifespan and ceases to be as afficient as a 10/30?
All but the last one. It's less efficient at operating temperature right out of the bottle because it's heavier at the same operating temperature.

That's why it's a 'racing oil' because it's expected that you'll be changing the oil more often.
No. It's "racing" oil because that's what the marketing department thought would sell more oil at higher prices. I think you'd be surprised at what oil formulations are used in professional racing situations where the engine is only started once and can be pre-warmed if needed. In less professional racing situations, yes you trade off high-temperature performance and a broader overall range for oil life.

Keep in mind that most stuff you see on the oil container (especially words like "racing," "performance" and the like) is marketing-speak. Even "synthetic" doesn't really mean that the oil is synthetically produced, and the vast bulk of "synthetic" oils are at least partially made from highly refined (Group III) mineral oil. Since the definition of "synthetic" is so broad, the term "semi-synthetic" is practically meaningless and I consider these oils to mostly be a ripoff unless you can get them at the same prices as the non-synthetic stuff (which you sometimes can). It's just marketing-speak to allow the oil companies to charge a lot more for something that only costs a little more.
 

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So you're saying a 10/30 is the way to go rather then a heavier 5/40?

One of the things that stood out to me while researching this is that heavier oils were recommended for the lifespan of an engine (links in previous posts). As a heavier oil keeps separation between the engine parts more then a lighter one, so less wear & tear. And that a heavier oil was preferred in hotter climates?

Also I'm trying to wrap my head around viscosity. How can my heavier 40 have a lower viscosity rating of 5 (flows better), then a lighter 30 oil that's rated 10???

Hmmm. Well I guess I will just see how to goes, how the bike runs, any smoke or emissions.
 

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Check out the "All About Motor Oil" link that MichaelInVenice posted above. Read the section "Making Multi-Grade Oil" and hopefully it will begin to make sense.

As a teenager driving an old junker with hardly any oil pressure, I would put 10W-50 in my old V-8 to help bring up the oil pressure. When it's cold, it's like having 10W oil in the engine to make it easier to start the engine and flow while it's cold. When it heats up, it flows like 50W oil. Read the article to understand better.
 

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What is best viscosity depends on operating temperature, load and rpm's.
Faster motor spins lower viscosity it needs.
Higher the operating temperature higher viscosity is needed.
30W is correct weight for motorcycle engine. It covers most of the conditions, except start up and shut down. This is when bearings wear out assuming all other is correct. When motor is spinning and temperature is correct your engine needs 30W oil, as designed.
 

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So you're saying a 10/30 is the way to go rather then a heavier 5/40?

One of the things that stood out to me while researching this is that heavier oils were recommended for the lifespan of an engine (links in previous posts). As a heavier oil keeps separation between the engine parts more then a lighter one, so less wear & tear. And that a heavier oil was preferred in hotter climates?

Also I'm trying to wrap my head around viscosity. How can my heavier 40 have a lower viscosity rating of 5 (flows better), then a lighter 30 oil that's rated 10???

Hmmm. Well I guess I will just see how to goes, how the bike runs, any smoke or emissions.
Read the article I posted.

"Heavy" and "light" are the wrong terms. It's high and low viscosity, which refers to the "thickness" of the oil and how well it flows. The first number is how the oil behaves when its cold. The second is how it behaves when it's hot. They both refer to the exact same thing, just at different temperatures! Keep in mind that oil flows more readily when it's hot, so a hot 40 grade oil might very well flow as well as a cold 10 grade. Actually it might flow better. Forget the term "weight" altogether. It's a historical anachronism that has nothing to do with today's multigrade oils. (When dealing with single-grade oils, the higher viscosities are in fact heavier all other things being equal.)

Problem with higher viscosity oils is that while in theory they lubricate better, they also don't flow as well. In an engine with tight tolerances, that means it may not get to the places it needs to get to because it's too thick.
 
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