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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys. I decided to start saving for a Cbr500r recently. after looking online with my local motorcycle dealership, they are selling the ABS(the one i want) version for $50 over the MSRP on the honda dealership.
so $6499. and its in the color i want. red.
anyway, i figured after all my taxes, gear, classes and everything else its going to cost about $8100 bucks. I have 1100 saved.

in the mean time as I save up, my friend is going to let me learn on his bike which is a Yamaha and its huge. i know its bigger than what I am getting.

I actually didn't want to get a 250, because i knew i would upgrade one day, but the 600's are 12 grand and out of my league. so this will fit me nicely.

I did have some questions. if i save up, I should be able to pick up the bike I want by october or november. but that is cold season. I can wait until february of 2014 and pick up the new version, and in the mean time learn on my friends bike, and get my gear ready without a rush.

is it cheaper to buy a bike during the winter? I am going to take a motorcycle course to get my endorsement, but after that, what would you say a learning curve would be? would 6 months to a year of learning with my friend suit me enough to ride on my own eventually?
I drive a manual transmission card now, so I think it will be a bit easier.

Thanks in advance for answering.
 

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Hey guys. I decided to start saving for a Cbr500r recently. after looking online with my local motorcycle dealership, they are selling the ABS(the one i want) version for $50 over the MSRP on the honda dealership.
so $6499. and its in the color i want. red.
anyway, i figured after all my taxes, gear, classes and everything else its going to cost about $8100 bucks. I have 1100 saved.

in the mean time as I save up, my friend is going to let me learn on his bike which is a Yamaha and its huge. i know its bigger than what I am getting.

I actually didn't want to get a 250, because i knew i would upgrade one day, but the 600's are 12 grand and out of my league. so this will fit me nicely.

I did have some questions. if i save up, I should be able to pick up the bike I want by october or november. but that is cold season. I can wait until february of 2014 and pick up the new version, and in the mean time learn on my friends bike, and get my gear ready without a rush.

is it cheaper to buy a bike during the winter? I am going to take a motorcycle course to get my endorsement, but after that, what would you say a learning curve would be? would 6 months to a year of learning with my friend suit me enough to ride on my own eventually?
I drive a manual transmission card now, so I think it will be a bit easier.

Thanks in advance for answering.

Supposedly the best time to buy a "new" motorcycle is in January/Febuary. This is because next years models will be arriving between Febuary and March and dealers want to get last years models off the floor.

The same goes for motorcycle gear as well. Though somethings fluxuate more than others. I buy most of my gear through RevZilla because they have a great return policy, selection and the Zilla cash adds up to about 5% back. You can get an idea on the money you'd save buy checking out their closeouts (Motorcycle Gear on Sale - RevZilla). I wouldn't buy any gear at the dealer as that stuff is typically marked up by around 30% or more.

That said when you buy in January/Febuary you typically have to settle on what they have in stock...So you may end up with a white bike, purple jacket, orange helmet.

I'll let others reply back to your other questions :)
 

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Fifty bucks over MSRP? I hope that's not the trend! Honda better be ready to make enough of these quick enough for us to avoid Miata Syndrome. I'm going to be cheesed off if I have to pay sticker for a new bike. We got our 250R for 400 under, and that was with no haggling at all.
Having to wait until October or November sounds terrible. Have you spoken to other dealers? What part of the world are you in?

The "best time to buy is in the winter" thing mainly applies to previous-year models (from dealers) and used motorcycles (especially from owners), I think.

You will not need a year of practice to get the hang of riding. Depending on how frequently you get to ride your friend's bike, you'll probably be quite ready within a month, especially if you take a course first. You'll be surprised at how quickly you'll gain basic proficiency. I'd guess maybe about 60 hours total of riding experience will have you feeling fairly comfortable, and by about 200 you'll feel at home.

Have fun, but be careful and smart.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
the 50 bucks over msrp is just what is advertised online. im sure its less. and if i flash the cash and say ill buy now it will be more dropped
and thank you for the awesome website. i might order everything at once from them.
not worried about selection, if i tell them red they will get me red, as far as the website, i can call customer service and get some matching things within my below budget i hope. i want to pay off the bike straight up.

cbr500r ABS 6499 helmet 100 eyes 20 ears 20 jacket 200 pants 200 boots 100 gloves 50 license change cost 20 motorcycle class 250 subtotal 7459 after tax 8055.72


this was my breakdown. if you think its off with certain prices on certain items let me know, i am obviously open to suggestions.
i think i am going to wait for the 2014 model to hit, because i will save enough money by the end of this summer, and then not want to ride in the winter. so i would rather actually buy in march of next year, and spend the summer then enjoying myself.

natrix, i'll spend at least 2-3 hours a week on my friend's bike. by your calculations mid summer i should feel comfortable. thats great news! thanks
 

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I am a tad surprised that no one has suggested that you buy a smaller used bike to start on.

It won't depreciate much. It will let you actually use a bike in the manner that you intend and determine how comfortable you are with that. And, finally, it will keep you from dropping your friends big yammi. Most folks have a slip or two while learning to ride. It is much nicer to not do that to a brand new bike, or to a friend's bike.

I started on a 250 and have never felt that I had to have a bigger bike, even after doing repeated 500+ mile days on a 250. My current "daily rider" will go 90 mph, cruises happily at 65-70 mph, and gets good gas mileage.

 

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Although I have been fortunate to always buy new bikes, I agree with jsonder. Owning a previously owned lower cc bike is an excellent suggestion. A 250cc is a great starting point as they are light, flickable and very forgiving. These qualities along with less $$ invested contribute towards a more relaxed approach towards learning to ride. Dropping a bike is a hideous humbling experience but is less painful when its not brand spanking new. Of course there are pros towards new ownership ie not inheriting the previous owners headaches. However, this can be avoided by bringing along a knowledgable friend. That said, all the best with your future purchase.
 

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Starting of riding with a 250cc bike is the smartest thing to do. I can't stress more on how important it is to learn the fundamentals of riding first before you start going fast. Insurance is cheaper too if your age is an issue. But, If you want to stick with a bike for a while and not looking in to upgrading then choosing the CBR500 might just be a wise choice.
 

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Hi, is it common to pay sticker price or over MSRP for this sort of bike or are most of you buying under sticker price?
 

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Hi, is it common to pay sticker price or over MSRP for this sort of bike or are most of you buying under sticker price?

I did a little calculation yesterday based on Invoice prices of last years models of both Kawasaki and Honda motorcycles. Here is what I found.

Ninja 250 (Invoice: $3870, MSRP: $4199) Total Markup: $329.
Ninja 650 (Invoice: $6675, MSRP: $7499) Total Markup: $824.

Hondas invoice pricing list wasn't as complete as Kawasaki's so I had to take what I could find.

CRF250 (Invoice: $6750, MSRP: $7410) Total Markup: $660.
Shadow Phantom (Invoice: $7665, MSRP: $8240) Total Markup: $617.

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Average Kawasaki Markup: $576.50
Average Honda Markup: $617.00
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When you buy a new bike the typical fees are:

- Price of the Bike
- Sales Tax
- Destination Fee (The fee that honda charges to ship the bikes to a dealer)
- Assembly (The fee that the dealer chargest to remove the crate, and slap on a few bolt on parts)
- Documentation fee (The fee the dealer charges to fill out all the paperwork such as financing and DMV related stuff)
- Title & Registration.

On average this typically is between $800 - $1000 dollars based on a bike that costs $6k or so.

Most people call the Destination fee a B.S. fee, and they could be right. I do know that shipping isn't free and you can see on the honda website that they charge a $310 dest fee for the NC700X in the states. But I'd imagine this destination fee is a tax writeoff for the dealers as a buisness expense. So if a dealer charges they really shouldn't be writing it off, and if they don't charge you then it's a potential tax write off for them. (Note I'm not that familiar with the tax code on dealerships but I'd imagine thats why most dealers even car dealers are willing to write off those fees easily)

The assembly charge is again a fee that the dealers charge. A reasonable charge IMHO would be the hourly wage of a single employee for an hour. Because I've watched unboxing videos and for most bikes they take the crate off, slap on some handle bars and check a few things then it's done.


Now most of the time you can get the dealer to knock off the destination & assembly charges. Assuming that it doesn't eat too much into the profit between the invoice/MSRP price. If destination cost $310 and assembly cost them $90 and the markup on the bike is $300 they probably won't be willing to bargin. (This can also be done by offering you the $5999 bike for $100-$300 off the MSRP but they charge you the dest & assembly fees so that they still make a profit off the sale)

So for a new bike you are going to be paying over MSRP simply because of the additional destination & assembly fees. If you bought the same bike used a 6 months from now with 20 miles on it you'd be saving between $300 - $400 on added fees alone even if you purchased it at a dealer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I will negotiate for the price to be under sticker before all the fees. I am in sales. I get that they need to get paid too. so I will pay the documentation fee, because that is their commission. I am waiting until 2014's models to see if there is any glitches with the 2013 500r's first. If I know product lines there are always changes the first few years.

today I got my first lesson on my friend's 2004 r6. it has a cracked sub frame, so he doesn't care if I drop it, or crash on it while I learn. he explained the parts of the bike and how they work. I was pretty nervous. so nervous that after 30 minutes I had to get off the bike because I was holding the clutch and brake levers so hard with my hands they started cramping.
I did learn something important, I am NOT used to the weight of a motorcycle.(i was a little on the weak side i gave blood today) but still, it was heavy!

I drive a stick now, so its like I have to re-learn how to drive a manual transmission car all over again. which is fine, and I had a blast.
I signed up for the GA DOT motorcycle safety course. it was $250 and part of my budget. I will be taking the class towards the end of april. 2 10 hour days on a sat/sun. if I make 80% of my tests, if I go get my license within 90 days they waive my written/riding test portion. so just paper work!
I'll be updating this thread regularly.

I have to get some gloves and over ankle boots as a requirement for the class, but also for when I get the bike. also in budget.

Lawrenceville Honda Yamaha Inventory
this says 6449. honda's website says 6499. 50 bucks below msrp? I bet good money I can talk them down a few hundred less. I plan to next year when its nice and cold and bike prices are cheap
 

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it's all just monopoly money anyway

I've heard that some people pay $4,200 for a CBR250R (out the door). That's right at MSRP, so you're basically saving the tax/tag/license. That fee would vary from locale to locale, but is probably something around $300. You can consider that as a $300 discount if it makes you feel better. :) I never consider the other fees (transportation, dealer set up, documenting, etc). The dirty secret is that these are usually already built in to the MSRP.

Having said that, and figuring there is a bit more profit margin on the CBR500R, I expect to pay $6,000 USD out-the-door (or on-the-road as the British say).

I'll echo the suggestion that a new rider might consider a smaller, less expensive, (possibly) used bike to start off. The CBR250R, Ninja 250R, and maybe even the Suzuki GW250 would all be reasonably "sporty" options for a beginner. Still, the CBR500R shouldn't be a problem for a new rider as well. It weighs 60 lbs more than a 250, and the seat height is just a tiny bit more. Maybe I'm wrong, but it seems that would still keep it user-friendly for inexperienced riders. The larger difference is the $2,000 in price. I guess you have to decide if that cost is worth the extra performance and the probability that you won't grow out of the 500 as fast as you might the 250.

I'm an experienced rider who has owned a number of 250 "beginner" bikes (including the CBR250R, Ninja 250R, and Suzuki TU250X, and even a Honda Rebel). The only one that I felt I "grew out of" was the Rebel (it was so slow that I worried about getting run over). The others were fun and capable enough that I could have been happy with them indefinitely.

I applaud your decision to take a rider's course! Don't skimp on your protective gear, and wear all of it every time you ride (I don't care if it's hot outside!). Keep us informed on how things go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
last saturday i went into cycle gear, and spent a good hour there. found some gloves for 20 bucks, and then tried almost every helmet they had.

the one that fit me the best in my opinion was an extra small Bilt helmet. I know its cycle gear's store brand, but it really did fit me best, and was way more comfortable than even the Shoei's. another brand came close, it was seven zero seven.

I was a bit annoyed because the cycle gear I went to didn't carry and scorpion helmets, and I wanted to get one with the pump up cheek things. like I said, I tried everything they had and ended up getting this
BILT - Speed Air Pump Full-Face Motorcycle Helmet - Full-Face - Motorcycle Helmets - Biker - CycleGear - Cycle Gear
in the black/red version. the pump thing was busted on the one i got saturday, so i asked them for a replacement, and I got it yesterday after they ordered it with no issues. I am pretty satisfied with cycle gear so far. their staff is very very patient. the guy that sold me the helmet and gloves even said to start on a smaller cc bike. but honestly I don't care. it makes no sense to me to spend 4000 on a 250 and then turn around to spend 7k on an upgrade.

my next purchase is going to be some boots there tomorrow.
boots i want to get
ALPINESTARS - SMX 1 Motorcycle Boots - Race - Motorcycle Boots - Street - CycleGear - Cycle Gear

while im out there I will visit the dealership I posted about earlier since they will be open. I'll sit on a bunch of bikes and see how they feel. especially the cbr500r. i might not even like it. **** i might not like any honda. I know the r6 was a bit high seating for me, so im gonna keep that in mind.

after the books will be the jacket, but i need to pass that class first so i can get 15% off of that jacket that I want.
DAINESE - Mugello STR Leather Motorcycle Jacket - Leather - Motorcycle Jackets - Street - CycleGear - Cycle Gear
i tried that jacket on its amazing and I want it.

question- how much mileage on a motorcycle is considered high mileage? I have a long time to decide if i want used or new, so what am I looking for thats low/medium/high mileage? and does age of a bike matter as long as it has been maintained the correct way?
 

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Mileage and age are really subjective. Personally, I would consider anything with less than 5,000 miles to be low mileage. I suppose I'd consider a bike with over 15,000 miles to be approaching a point where I'd look for crash damage, bodged repair jobs, modifications that suck, the operation of the controls and gauges, wheel bearings, the chain, operation of the clutch, sprocket, valve adjustment, smooth shifting, throttle adjustment, the age of the brake fluid and lines, etc. I always inspect the condition of the tires and plan on doing an oil/filter change right away.

So, when I shop for a used bike I prefer it to have less than 10,000 miles. But, that's just me. In my opinion, used bikes with higher miles than that are more likely to have some sort of issue. Higher end bikes are often better maintained (like Harleys, BMWs, and Italian stuff), so that can be taken into consideration. Japanese sport bikes and entry level bikes can be pretty clapped out and abused.

I certainly wouldn't consider the R6 as a first bike. Full on Supersports bikes are not for beginners! I also disagree that a 250cc bike is something you'd necessarily grow out of.

I'm not trying to tell you what you should buy. Just offering some friendly advice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
today I went to the dealership to see the cbr500r. they didn't even have them delivered. the website showed they had them. I was not annoyed as the cycle gear was across the street and I went and picked up those boots that I posted above. I sat on a 250, it was comfortable. then I sat on a 600 and it was comfortable. the sales lady told me in riding boots I would sit flush to the ground on my feet. I was flat on the front but not the back of my feet.
then i went to try some yamahas, and they are just too high for me personally. I sat on a bunch of different bikes to see how each feels. I will be learning on a rebel 250 or some variant of it in that motorcycle safety class.
also comparatively the bikes I tried were much lighter than the r1 that I am learning on. that bike feels like a pig now

regardless the boots are nice, and really comfortable.
I told her I wanted the red/black with ABS. i'll have to do some shopping around
 

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today I went to the dealership to see the cbr500r. they didn't even have them delivered. the website showed they had them. I was not annoyed as the cycle gear was across the street and I went and picked up those boots that I posted above. I sat on a 250, it was comfortable. then I sat on a 600 and it was comfortable. the sales lady told me in riding boots I would sit flush to the ground on my feet. I was flat on the front but not the back of my feet.
then i went to try some yamahas, and they are just too high for me personally. I sat on a bunch of different bikes to see how each feels. I will be learning on a rebel 250 or some variant of it in that motorcycle safety class.
also comparatively the bikes I tried were much lighter than the r1 that I am learning on. that bike feels like a pig now

regardless the boots are nice, and really comfortable.
I told her I wanted the red/black with ABS. i'll have to do some shopping around
The new line of bikes is being shipped out starting April 02nd which is probably why that dealership didnt have one for you to sit on ...
 

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I'm an experienced rider who has owned a number of 250 "beginner" bikes (including the CBR250R, Ninja 250R, and Suzuki TU250X, and even a Honda Rebel). The only one that I felt I "grew out of" was the Rebel (it was so slow that I worried about getting run over). The others were fun and capable enough that I could have been happy with them indefinitely.
Buford, I'm been riding a Rebel 250 for the past 3 years and can finally afford to buy a new bike (now that I'm done with grad school and have a job). I was ecstatic when Honda announced the new 500 series as I wanted something new, but was going to settle for a used Hornet so I could stay in the Honda family, seeing as I didn't want to take some crazy jump to 600 cc bike, but was still looking for more power for obvious reasons. I've got over 4,000 miles under my belt now and am looking at the CB500F. Based on your riding experience, do you think I should consider the CTX700N, or will that leave me in a similar position wanting more power.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
@cb500f - they showed in stock on the website as I said, so I thought they had them. And I have read on this forum that people already bought one, I figured they were already out.

also, I might actually be getting a used motorcycle. although I don't have a problem saving for a new 500r, financially it feels like a waste. after tax tag and title i will be breaking 7000 or 7500.
I am currently looking to pick up a 2002 cbr954. please spare me the im going to die speech. there are some people who respect their abilities, I am one of them. the bike has 152xx miles, and I will be putting it in my dad's garage until I am done training on my friend's r6. he's gonna drive it to my dads for me if I buy it. the guy wants 4k obo. so I know thats the most I will have to spend on it.

anyway, i signed up here because i thought i was going to get one of these bikes, but a better deal came along. I will keep updating this thread with my riding experiences and class I will be taking in 3 weeks.

I already have rules set in my head that I have learned.
Everyone is drunk and you are invisible
its not if you lay down the bike its when
 

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I already have rules set in my head that I have learned.
Everyone is drunk and you are invisible
its not if you lay down the bike its when
That is exactly how a smart rider rides. You always have to prepare for the worst, in a car you can dose of for a second or two. On a bike that might cost you your life.
 

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buying an 11 years old bike for 4000 bucks and spending another 4000 bucks for repairs and constant visit to mechanics as a newbie, i hope not.
I hope your cbr954 is a good, maintained one.
 
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