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2018 CB500F Lowered marginally front and rear but otherwise stock.

I'm coming off a CB300F and while I enjoyed how light the bike was to toss around, it was tiring on longer rides. Picked up this CB500 with about 400 miles and like it so far. Good power for me and comfortable even though I'm pretty small.

The handling seems odd though. Compared to my CB300 and compared to other bikes I've ridden, this CB500 doesn't seem to like to fall into turns very easily. Once you get it over it seems ok but it really seems to want to stand back up.

We raised the bike back to stock and it feels the same way. My guess is the tires perhaps. They seem very mild and the front seems huge on the bike but I wanted to check in here before going too far down that road.

Any advice would be appreciated.

Thanks

Erica
 

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2018 CB500F Lowered marginally front and rear but otherwise stock.

I'm coming off a CB300F and while I enjoyed how light the bike was to toss around, it was tiring on longer rides. Picked up this CB500 with about 400 miles and like it so far. Good power for me and comfortable even though I'm pretty small.

The handling seems odd though. Compared to my CB300 and compared to other bikes I've ridden, this CB500 doesn't seem to like to fall into turns very easily. Once you get it over it seems ok but it really seems to want to stand back up.

We raised the bike back to stock and it feels the same way. My guess is the tires perhaps. They seem very mild and the front seems huge on the bike but I wanted to check in here before going too far down that road.

Any advice would be appreciated.

Thanks

Erica
I would say you are used to lighter bikes which are always flickable. The cb500 is a flickable bike but I think you have to give yourself more road miles. Check the tyre pressures. If it's on dunlop tyres they are a bit slower to turn than some. I wouldn't change anything yet until you get used to the bike. Trust me these bikes handle a dream, they drop into the corners, hold a line and are virtually unflappable. You can get them onto the hero blobs with ease. You will get some more advice from the forum. Good luck and keep us posted.
 

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Thanks for the response. You may be right but my boyfriend feels the same reluctance and he's coming off an 1100 Ducati Hypermotard and a 1200 Monster.

I will keep riding it as is the rest of this season but will probably try tires in the spring at some point.
 

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You can check that the tires on the bike are the factory specified sizes (with only 400 miles we assume they are but worth checking). A different size would make a big difference.

The height of the front versus the rear of any bike makes a difference in how easily the bike turns in.

Since you are a lighter rider, be sure the front pre-load adjusters are mostly out (counter-clockwise). This lowers the front end a bit which improves turn-in a bit. Also helps the suspension work properly for light riders.

Similarly check that the rear shock pre-load is in the factory default position or one notch softer (see owners manual). This is to get the suspension working properly for your weight.

If you added a rear lowering link, it may be adjusted too low compared to the front. Too low gets the seat down but slows turn-in.
I would find it hard to tell if my bike was "level" with a lowering link.
You can try adjusting the rear up 1/2" and see if turn-in improves.

Enjoy.
 

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Tires with a lot of miles on them really affect the feel of the bike.

Rear tires tend to develop a flat-strip down the center. To lean that the forces need to "lever" the bike over the transition from the flat strip to the still-round sides. An extreme example:



Front tires typically get a "double-U' shaped wear pattern. Our own Karl Hungus posted this pic which shows it very well:



While both in these images are on the extreme side, even small amounts of wear in that fashion will alter the feel of the bike. Carefully check yours for similar wear.

It goes without saying that low tire pressure can cause crappy feeling handling too...
 

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When accelerating through a bend, the counter-steering needs to be "reasonably forcefull" and maintained, to keep the bike leaned over.

Changing tyre profile (shape) from sports-touring to sports-track profile makes a big difference. The bike feels like it is on skinny tyres, with willingness to lean-over and stay there; particularly the front tyre.

Recommended that both tyres should have the same profile; if not the ABS might sometimes activate early at low speed (not ideal but tolerable). Also, you can feel that one end of the bike is less willing (or slower) to lean-over, but you'll soon get used to it.
 

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I believe there is a (general) rule-of-thumb of <3x your body weight (that applies to wheel burrow ... and arguably bikes too), when your weight affecting the machine becomes negligible. e.g. 70+kg person can still partially (to a point) "weight-handle" the bike (194kg) vs someone <60kg (who will feel a bigger difference between a ~160kg CB300 vs CB500).
 

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You can also try lowering the triple tree down on the fork tubes in small increments until you find the spot that is right for you. On my F I ended up dropping it quite a bit to get the response I wanted and it was still very stable and not twitchy at all. I also raised the rear as well. That bike would lay over very easily. Had to remove the feelers from the pegs.
 

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2018 CB500F Lowered marginally front and rear but otherwise stock.

I'm coming off a CB300F and while I enjoyed how light the bike was to toss around, it was tiring on longer rides. Picked up this CB500 with about 400 miles and like it so far. Good power for me and comfortable even though I'm pretty small.

The handling seems odd though. Compared to my CB300 and compared to other bikes I've ridden, this CB500 doesn't seem to like to fall into turns very easily. Once you get it over it seems ok but it really seems to want to stand back up.

We raised the bike back to stock and it feels the same way. My guess is the tires perhaps. They seem very mild and the front seems huge on the bike but I wanted to check in here before going too far down that road.

Any advice would be appreciated.

Thanks

Erica
Hi this is Andy....I have owned both a 2016 & 2018 CBR500r . I have rode over 54000 miles on these two bikes. The best tires that I like are the Dunlop Q3 +... they transform the handling. Quick to turn in and hold a line perfectly. I’m sure if you try them you will like them. :)
 

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I have had thousands and thousands of miles on various bikes (particularly BMW's) and the best tires I could find were Michelins. Dunlops, to me were a joke.

I am betting that your tire(s) have a "flat spot" worn in the middle and as you go to lean, it takes more effort to get over the "hump" at the edges of this flat. When I had my last BMW, I had that issue and didn't really know it as I had gotten used to it. When I put on a new rear tire, I couldn't believe just how easy (almost scary at first) it was to lean into a corner. Once I got used to the full flow of the new-rounded tire, it became a joy!
 

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Michelins and Metzelers are usually my to-go tires. The stock Michelins that came with this USA cb500F 2019 are just fine, have not had any issues with turns and twists here on the fun roads in California. So I will wear them out before replacing them.
 

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While I would be the first to agree on tires on tires being a problem; after 400 miles..hmmmm. I don't know what kind of cornering you are having a problem with. Not all cornering is the same. On a normal city street I don't take a corner the same as I would out riding backroads or canyons or even on a track.
Reading the title you used where you used the word "reluctance" I would guess that has more to do with you as a beginner on the bike unless there is something else wrong with your bike. I'm not trying to be mean, I have 67k on my 2013, I rode that bike from California to Rhode Island and back. I ride my bike a lot, I can't figure out what your problem is. if there is nothing wrong with your bike then the problem is you. I also have to live with this realization that sometimes the problem is me.
The best thing to do is ride the loneliest places you can find where you can be slower to get a good feel for the bike. Have a friend around if you like, go together, learn how your bike rides. Like I said I can't really say without seeing you ride and the area your riding in.
 
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