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Discussion Starter #1
So I bought a salvage bike and so far so good. Everything is ok and it runs and drives nicely. I was going to go and change the chain and sprockets when I saw that my rear tire is out of wack. When compared to the other parts of the bike. The bike is symmetrical until you get to the rear tire. Am I tripping cuz the subframe is bent and is making the rear tire look slanted or is the swingarm messed up? Or do I need to align the wheel? Thanks for reaching and helping a brother out 馃憤 [Since the alignment isn't that bad, Is this still roadworthy and rideable?]
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Since the alignment isn't that bad, Is this still roadworthy and rideable?
 

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Looking at the picture you need to investigate further before you ride the bike. Something is well out of line.
 

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Swingarm or subframe is out of wack.
 

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Seeing some pictures of it when you bought it, so we can see what was impacted and the likely points of impact would help us suggest what might be bent/twisted, my gut feeling is the rear subframe is slightly bent and that has the lights and everything then leaning to one side.
 

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My best guess is the photo shows the rear subframe is twisted, which would be a cosmetic problem. Honda calls these two frame pieces "seat rails".

However if the bike got hit that hard in the rear, the swingarm may also be bent or twisted. A serious problem that could be hidden by the subframe damage.

Not sure how you check for swingarm twist without removing it from the bike.
 

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Should be checked professionally really. But I would start with a flat floor, spirit level on the main frame in front or rear of fuel tank to check bike is level. Then you can put the spirit level on the subframe and swingarm to check for twist. You can then put a spirit level on the rims or tyres to check front and rear is something like upright. You could check the wheels are in line with a straight edge and a tape because don't forget the rear is wider than the front. Remove the rear wheel and see if it comes out fairly easy, because if the swing arm is twisted it may make taking the wheel out more difficult.In the UK that bike would need an inspection before going on the road. Hopes this helps and good luck.
 

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Looks like the plastics on the subframe aren't assembled properly so my guess is that the problem is up there: Someone took it apart, saw **** was bent and twisted and slapped it back together without regard to making it right.

The bike needs a good going over by a pro to check for fractures/cracks, yielded metal etc.

Maybe you can post more close-up pics of both sides of the the swingarm, frame, subframe etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
So here are pictures from when I bought the bike, I got it from crashtoys and I always wanted a motorcycle but didn't have the funds for a good one since im only 19. This bike runs and drives perfectly. I got this bike for 600 bucks and it looks better than any of the bikes they had at that time. A lot has changed since then including the front headlight frame which I replaced and I fairings. I changed the driver pegs and got a new chain and sprocket. I'll update this post with pictures now as soon as possible.


1.jpg 3.jpg 2.jpg 4.jpg
 

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Nice purchase. Good on you for staying within your own budget. (y) All the ideas mentioned above ae valid. If you're comfortable ridding the bike 'as is', go for it. But, do yourself a favor and error on the side of safety. Take a good look at the swingarms, rear wheel, axle, anything in that area.. to be sure there are no welds broken or obvious cracks. Being out of alignment is certainly not good, but having structural damage to the frame or supporting members is really unsafe.. and would be unwise to overlook. Good Luck and Ride Safe.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
My best guess is the photo shows the rear subframe is twisted, which would be a cosmetic problem. Honda calls these two frame pieces "seat rails".

However, if the bike got hit hat hard in the rear, the swingarm may also be bent or twisted. A serious problem that could be hidden by the subframe damage.

Not sure how you check for swingarm twist without removing it from the bike.
Alright. I did just that. today was my free day so I tried to align the rear tire to make it at least on the same alignment however the direction. It turns out the rear tire is aligned to the front tire. I checked the threads to double-check and they were both good at 13 threads each. the swingarm shows no signs of damage or scratches (except for dust and the usual wear. but nothing serious or eye-catching.) and in the natural straight state as well. So the swingarm is out of the question. But the Subframe is indeed bent. It leans far to the right and. I believe the bike was laid down too hard, evidence for that is the left headlight assembly being bent at the upper left side when I replaced the entire thing a month ago. see here:
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after calling many bike repair shops near me, they told me that frame damage is not something they deal with. So I'm left with 2 things, 1, repair the subframe myself by bending it back into place or 2, buying a new subframe. I was wondering what action I should take since you guys are my last hope. Here are the pictures from my investigation excuse the dirty environment, it's not mine.
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If you took the swingarm off the bike, checked it on a flat surface for twist, with a straight edge for bends, found no bend or twist, then great.

The seat rail assembly is easy to unbolt from the bike, though there are many steps. See the shop manual.

You can try straightening the seat rail off the bike (to avoid bending the main frame). Doesn't need to be perfect, just improving the look.

Or you can buy a new or used replacement.
The crash may have caused some slight bend at the mounting points in the main frame, so alignment may not be quite perfect.

In the USA, Honda OEM parts can be purchased online at much lower prices. The seat rail is listed under "frame".
 

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Discussion Starter #12
If you took the swingarm off the bike, checked it on a flat surface for twist, with a straight edge for bends, found no bend or twist, then great.

The seat rail assembly is easy to unbolt from the bike, though there are many steps. See the shop manual.

You can try straightening the seat rail off the bike (to avoid bending the main frame). Doesn't need to be perfect, just improving the look.

Or you can buy a new or used replacement.
The crash may have caused some slight bend at the mounting points in the main frame, so alignment may not be quite perfect.

In the USA, Honda OEM parts can be purchased online at much lower prices. The seat rail is listed under "frame".
Would u consider riding as is? I say this because the subframe isn't connected to the swingarm and doesn't hamper handling. that i now of course
 

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Let me offer a way of looking at stuff like this. Have had to make these decisions for many decades, still not perfect.

The large twist shows us that the rear got hit pretty good. You say the bike rides fine. But that doesn't mean there isn't some part attached to the rear subframe that also got damaged, or partly broke free from the subframe and is now barely hanging on.

So examine every item that attaches to the subframe for damage. Think of how big a problem an item could cause! Like a brake reservoir that is now just held onto the frame by the brake hose, or has a cracked housing and is leaking. Brake light and other wiring damage, passenger seat not latching securely, etc., etc.
If you don't look you won't find even obvious problems.
If you unbolted all the parts to change the subframe, you would inspect them as you did the work..

A caution
Due to the twist, the passenger seat is off-center. If you take a heavy passenger, especially if you are a newer rider, this will unbalance the bike side-to-side. Check the balance out with a light passenger on an empty street, don't just ignore it and then suddenly take a heavy friend for a ride in major traffic. (I sound like parent here, I know)
 
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Discussion Starter #14
Let me offer a way of looking at stuff like this. Have had to make these decisions for many decades, still not perfect.

The large twist shows us that the rear got hit pretty good. You say the bike rides fine. But that doesn't mean there isn't some part attached to the rear subframe that also got damaged, or partly broke free from the subframe and is now barely hanging on.

So examine every item that attaches to the subframe for damage. Think of how big a problem an item could cause! Like a brake reservoir that is now just held onto the frame by the brake hose, or has a cracked housing and is leaking. Brake light and other wiring damage, passenger seat not latching securely, etc., etc.
If you don't look you won't find even obvious problems.
If you unbolted all the parts to change the subframe, you would inspect them as you did the work..

A caution
Due to the twist, the passenger seat is off-center. If you take a heavy passenger, especially if you are a newer rider, this will unbalance the bike side-to-side. Check the balance out with a light passenger on an empty street, don't just ignore it and then suddenly take a heavy friend for a ride in major traffic. (I sound like parent here, I know)

Thank you for your reply! It really helps me out!! I will further inspect the subframe and eventually pull it out to measure extensively. And thanks again for the word of caution. since I have a learner permit I cannot legally carry a passenger and I don't plan to do so when I get endorsed.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
How does one adjust a rear tire? do you do it via the chain adjusters and adjust the axle blocks? or do u loosen the axle nut all together and move it by hand?
 

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The axle nuts need to be loosened so the wheel can move forward and backwards.. adjustments are slight and are done with the chain adjusters. If you don't already have an owners manual for the bike, you can download a PDF copy for free off Honda's website. Read through it's "adjusting the chain" section. I have a link below... fill in the info, agree, and go.
I also have a link for a how-to video on adjusting rear wheel and chain. You can get an idea of what moves and what doesn't. Good Luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The axle nuts need to be loosened so the wheel can move forward and backwards.. adjustments are slight and are done with the chain adjusters. If you don't already have an owners manual for the bike, you can download a PDF copy for free off Honda's website. Read through it's "adjusting the chain" section. I have a link below... fill in the info, agree, and go.
I also have a link for a how-to video on adjusting rear wheel and chain. You can get an idea of what moves and what doesn't. Good Luck.
Thanks My friend! I just ordered a Haynes manual so I should be good to go in the future. I don't know a lot of people who ride, and i think im the only kid i know who rides, so this forum is a lifesaver! thanks again, friends!!
 

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Thanks My friend! I just ordered a Haynes manual so I should be good to go in the future. I don't know a lot of people who ride, and i think im the only kid i know who rides, so this forum is a lifesaver! thanks again, friends!!
I doubt you are going to adjust your way out of this. First thing I would do is the press upward on the lower run of the drive chain and then, using an LED flashlight, sight along the top of the chain to see if it is mounted in a straight line or is curved. If the chain is curved, you have a shot at correcting the problem by chain adjustment from side to side. If the top run of the chain is straight, you have a problem with the swing arm or sub-frame adjustment. Attention by a shop mechanic is suggested.
 
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