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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Rear axle won't come out! (Solved)

Hi, I've recently tried changing my sprockets and chain. Front sprocket went okay, but I couldn't get my rear wheel off the best I tried. I spent 6 hours with a rubber mallet, and got my chain adjusters un seized but couldn't get any further. I have a 19mm socket and the correct 23mm for the other side. What I tried:

Take weight off wheel

Use a rubber mallet hitting the reversed bolt on one side.

Using two flatheads, pushing bolt out on one side and hitting it on the other.

A fuckfload of pb blaster

Does anyone have any extra ideas? As of now, I bought some pieces of wood and a bigger hammer as well as some Kroil to really unseize whatever is blocking it. I have asked this question elsewhere and the running theory is that the wheel bearing seized to the axle. I am now also going to purchase bearings to swap out when I do get that **** wheel out.

Update:

Thanks everyone for your suggestions. Thrasherg was right, a big part of my axle was corroded.

To take the axle out, I sprayed some Kroil and hit it with a bigger hammer. If you're reading this and wondering how hard I hit it the answer is very, and that's why I had also planned to swap my wheel bearings. I think the rubber hammer was absorbing too much force. I used fine grit and removed the corrosion and cleaned every spacer I could, as well as put new bearings in for good measure. Re-Greased the parts and all.
 

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To be clear, did you get the nut off the axle? Can you post photos?

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Discussion Starter #3
Sorry I didn't take pictures when I was doing this. The nut come off with no issues, the axle just doesn't slide out.
 

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Sorry I didn't take pictures when I was doing this. The nut come off with no issues, the axle just doesn't slide out.
The only thing I can think of is the rusted spacer or bearing inner race.
Usually the sprocket carrier bearing is the one what is failing first, but normally they should not rust on the shaft due to the chain lubricants preventing rust.
If you have been able to unfreeze the adjusters, slacken the chain and remove from the rear sprocket. Try to heat the left side spacer with propane and use the hammer to remove the axle.
I must say I've never experienced such thing on modern bikes, so good luck.
 

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As stated, if you have removed the nut from the end of the axle there is nothing (except corrosion) that will prevent the axle from coming out. You need to spray penetrating oil and use a big hammer!! I would suggest putting the nut back on the end of the axle before you hit it with a hammer as that will help protect the threads..


Gary
 

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This is why I remove axles early-on and grease them. I recommend this preventive step for all bikes, especially those used in rainy climates. Thumbs up to Thashberg for reminding all to re-fit the axle nut before pounding on the axle. No point compounding your headaches by mangling the threads on an axle.

I'd like to see a follow-up re how the axle removal finally happened.

Ralph
 

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Agree with Ralph. Both points very valid. I have found that axles are usually dry when bike is shipped. Do some preventive maintenance on new bike. Grease or just oil axles to avoid corrosion. So much easier to get apart later when it becomes time to take things apart.
 

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I must say I've never experienced such thing on modern bikes, so good luck.
Same here. I suspect there's something else amiss here.
When I remove the rear wheel, I put a scissor jack underneath it and raise it to effectively remove any weight from the axle. After I remove the axle, I let the wheel roll down the incline of the jack. Smooth as butter.
Here is the page from the maintenance manual.


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Discussion Starter #11
Update:

Thanks everyone for your suggestions. Thrasherg was right, a big part of my axle was corroded.

To take the axle out, I sprayed some Kroil and hit it with a bigger hammer. If you're reading this and wondering how hard I hit it the answer is very, and that's why I had also planned to swap my wheel bearings. I think the rubber hammer was absorbing too much force. I used fine grit and removed the corrosion and cleaned every spacer I could, as well as put new bearings in for good measure. Re-Greased the parts and all.
 

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Update:



Thanks everyone for your suggestions. Thrasherg was right, a big part of my axle was corroded.



To take the axle out, I sprayed some Kroil and hit it with a bigger hammer. If you're reading this and wondering how hard I hit it the answer is very, and that's why I had also planned to swap my wheel bearings. I think the rubber hammer was absorbing too much force. I used fine grit and removed the corrosion and cleaned every spacer I could, as well as put new bearings in for good measure. Re-Greased the parts and all.
Pictures?

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Years of riding experiences and unknown latent knowledge to share concerning a problem. And as so often, the easiest and most efficient path to a successful solution.... is a "bigger hammer". :smileup Glad it all worked out for you. Ride Safe.
 
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