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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone!
I recently purchased a 2014 CB500F for my first bike. I'm completely new to riding but plan on commuting with my bike as soon as I feel comfortable on it.

I had a lesson from a friend on his 500X before even looking at a motorcycle and it felt so normal that I wanted to get something similar.

My plan is to just learn to ride better, mods will come later.

Cheers!
 

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Welcome to the club, the 500 is a great choice for a first bike, they are very capable and can maintain sustained highway speeds..
Don't be too embarrassed to ask any questions, we all had to learn once..


Gary
 

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Each state has its rules. Some require formal training and some don't.


Some states that require the training will pay for it and others make the rider pay.


Complicated and confusing, but not too bad if you just look at the state where you reside.
Some states treat the 3-wheel (trikes) vehicles differently than the 2-wheel vehicles.
Some state lump all of the together.... get a license on a 50cc scooter and be legal on V-8 engined trike !


This is called "states rights".


Ride safely
 

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As a rule, no, in the USA and Canada you are not required to do any formal training to get a motorcycle license. In Ontario, you can get a beginner's license just by writing a short paper exam. And boom, you can operate a motorcycle of any size on the roads. It was by pure chance that I learned that I should do safety training first. Otherwise, I'd probably be dead now. Believe me, the more we push the safety training the more lives we'll save.
 

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Each state has its rules. Some require formal training and some don't.

Some states that require the training will pay for it and others make the rider pay.
Amazing. Here in Spain despite having had my car driving license for more than ten years, I still had to do three official exams to get a "limited A2 motorbike" license, which still only allows for bikes up to 35 kW (47 HP). The exams were:
1) a written test about all things motorcycle (20 questions, and you can fail no more than two);
2) a riding test on a closed circuit, with two parts, A) to slowly sort through some cones very closely spaced among themselves and placed between two white lines which you cannot touch, without any time limit, you cannot set any foot on the floor; and B) to do a speed circuit going through some fast cones and doing a 180º degree turn and then making an emergency brake at the end, in less than 25 seconds.
3) a riding test in the open streets, while followed by a car with the examiner, wearing a helmet fitted with an intercom to receive instructions about which way to go, it lasts about 15 minutes and you have to nail every Stop and every pedestrian crossing and every red light and every yield, otherwise you are toast.

And then the examiners are not any private motorcycle instructors you can hire, but public servants unknown to you.

I was lucky and passed all three exams in the first try. I still had to pay about 550 Euros for the whole fiesta: to gain access to a private facility replicating the slow and fast circuits to train for those tests, and to do a mock riding test in the open streets with a private motorcycle instructor (useful because the private instructor here warns you about common pitfalls the examiner is going to try to make you fail), and to pay for the three official exam taxes. If you fail any of the three tests, you have to take the test again and pay again the taxes for the failed test (I think you are required to wait a minimum of 15 days if you have to retake any test, not sure as it wasn't my case).

And then, after two years holding the A2 license, I will be eligible to pass another riding exam with a bigger bike if I want to upgrade to a full A motorbike license. This will be about 300 Euros additionally, because it legally requires also sitting through 8 hours of in-situ lectures about motorbike safety by an approved private motorcycle instructor (no official test needed afterwards on that theory, thankfully).

Welcome to a nanny State!

Here you can see a famous Youtube video about practicing the slow and fast riding tests on closed circuit for the A2 license (warning: it's Spanish spoken):
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Welcome.


You SHOULD take the motorcycle safety training as well as wear your safety gear.
So how does the motorcycle license thing works in the USA? Is there any mandatory training and/or exam?
Many go years and years without ever having a motorcycle license. As long as they aren't riding stupidly, they likely will never get pulled over.


In Texas a motorcycle safety course is a class that covers and exempts you from the written and driving portion of the test at the licensing office. Mine is set for a few weeks out from now. In the mean time I'm riding around my neighborhood and practicing low speed manouvers in parking lots.

There's more rules if you don't have a valid driver's license or are under a certain age, but I don't have to worry about that, I've had a license for 10+ years now and 2 of those I had a commercial driver's license for transit busses.

The government agencies are slow and so poorly ran that requiring more would just be a nuisance to everyone involved(I already spent 4 hours in person waiting, just to change my address on my license and couldn't even renew it because I didn't have a copy of my birth certificate or passport with me). A regular license here means you can drive nearly any passenger vehicle or truck, 50hp or 2000+hp , restrictions come in for larger vehicles that are over 26k pounds or have air brakes, also depending on what you are transporting you will have separate tests for endorsements on your license. Ex, hazmat - passengers - flammable
 

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In Texas a motorcycle safety course is a class that covers and exempts you from the written and driving portion of the test at the licensing office.
Does the motorcycle safety course involve any kind of exam at the end? If yes, is it 100% privately held and done, or is some public servant involved in the testing? When you get the motorcycle license in Texas, is it called "A-type licence".

Somehow USA riders who travel overseas and ride bikes there must have a motorcycle license of some kind, I guess. Is that called "A-type motorcycle license" or some such in the USA?
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
In Texas a motorcycle safety course is a class that covers and exempts you from the written and driving portion of the test at the licensing office.
Does the motorcycle safety course involve any kind of exam at the end? If yes, is it 100% privately held and done, or is some public servant involved in the testing? When you get the motorcycle license in Texas, is it called "A-type licence".

Somehow USA riders who travel overseas and ride bikes there must have a motorcycle license of some kind, I guess. Is that called "A-type motorcycle license" or some such in the USA?
The course is the exam in a way. If the instructors do not feel you are ready, they will not pass you.
The class has to follow a state standard for time, 15 hours, and material covered.

You don't have to take a class, the other option is written and practical test at the license office.


No, just a motorcycle license or endorsement whichever you prefer. It allows any type of bike to be ridden anywhere.


If the people riding want to be stupid and ride without a helmet or any hear that is their choice and I fully support that they have the option. They are absolutely stupid beyond belief for not wearing a helmet but I object to forcing it.
 

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If the people riding want to be stupid and ride without a helmet or any hear that is their choice and I fully support that they have the option. They are absolutely stupid beyond belief for not wearing a helmet but I object to forcing it.
That laisser faire regarding helmets does not fly here, because health care is a universal service provided by the State to all citizens, paid by the taxes of all citizens.

That's the plus side of a nanny State.
 

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A helmet law or lack there of does cause problems when riders cross state boundaries and the helmet law changes to being required.
And it makes no sense to ride without a helmet, boots and gloves. I wear MC jeans & jacket as well as ear plugs.


Be safe, and have fun
 

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Discussion Starter #14
A helmet law or lack there of does cause problems when riders cross state boundaries and the helmet law changes to being required.
And it makes no sense to ride without a helmet, boots and gloves. I wear MC jeans & jacket as well as ear plugs.


Be safe, and have fun
I can imagine. Won't be a problem for me because helmets rock.

I'm looking at a mesh jacket with armor because its been 100-105 degrees the past few days
 

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I wanted to add a lighter jacket for the brutal summer's heat... But didn't care to spend a lot of money. I found this jacket and have been impressed with it. I'm sure I could pick it apart and find better armor and such on jackets that costs twice as much, but it serves my purposes. Like most things, sizes and colors are sometimes limited.
 

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Mesh fabric gear for the hot climates is great. Almost like wearing nothing except for the armor in all the right places. I am using Joe Rocket stuff for a lot of my riding gear. Good quality & a decent price. I like the full textile riding suit for long days & or wet & cold conditions. Over time you will add things as needed. I prefer hi-viz gear as ugly as it is it might just make the difference some potentially unlucky day.
Interesting discussion on licensing. It would be good if everyone had to do what Farlopo was obliged to do in Spain. However, in the land of the free, we are free to DIY pretty much. I was piloting motos from the age of 9 & by the time I got my learners permit (for a regular auto license) at 15 1/2 I was good to go on my Yamaha 100. I do recall a simple written test & a parking lot test with a few cones & such, but that was it. Once the M stamp was on my license it was good for life. However, I suggest you read books & check out motorcycle safety videos to get a better idea of what you are getting into. This IS NOT like driving a car with two wheels. Check out MC Rider on YouTube, he is a safety instructor in Texas & has a huge amount of good information to pass on. My parting shot to a new rider: relax, focus, breathe, relax. Like many things in life, the calmer you are the better it goes. Tense up & it all goes south. Enjoy this wonderful mode of transportation.
 
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