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Discussion Starter #1
Okay so I’m new-ish to the bike scene. I’ve had my bike for a little while and I was dumb enough to get a bike without doing appropriate research. My main concern with buying the bike was to go from spending $150 in fuel for my truck every week to spending way less.

Questions:
Oil changes- do I also need to upkeep the chain every time I change the oil? If so how do I do this?! I like to do all my own maintenance work instead of taking it somewhere cuz I’m a wannabe grease monkey.

Fairings- I took a slide and need to replace them on my 2013 CBR500R. What do you all suggest I use/ where can I find the best prices? Also turn signals. And before you mention, yes I made sure the fuel tank was not damaged in my slide so I know I don’t have to replace it.

Other maintenance- what do I need to know to keep my bike running properly? I start and run it for 20 minutes after it’s warmed it when it’s too cold to take it for a ride and I use my battery tender so the battery doesn’t get angry with me.

Any tips would be extremely helpful for me. There’s not many (read practically none) female bike clubs down here for us sport bike riders so asking dumb questions semi-anonymously doesn’t cause the anxiety it would asking the general populous in my area. Everyone here rides harleys or if they ride sport bikes I see more guys in uniform riding them than someone I feel comfortable talking to.
 

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Welcome to the world of motorcycling.


1. Use the battery minder (not charger) to keep the battery fresh but do NOT run the engine without riding.

There is no useful function to running the engine instead of riding.


2. The chain should be cleaned & lubricated every 500 miles. I use DuPont Teflon=based chain lube.
If you don't ride in wet or dirty (unpaved roads), then you might stretch the cleaning to 1000 miles.
[ Getting a center stand makes chain maintenance much easier]


3. Fairings. Unless you hate the present looks of the bike, I'd wait a while to buy new fairings.
Partzilla.com usually has the best prices in USA. https://www.partzilla.com/catalog/honda/motorcycle/2013/cbr500r-a-cbr500r/upper-cowl


https://www.partzilla.com/catalog/honda/motorcycle/2013/cbr500r-a-cbr500r/middle-cowl


4. Honda turn signals are inexpensive and easy to install. I'd use them for replacements for now.
https://www.partzilla.com/catalog/honda/motorcycle/2013/cbr500r-a-cbr500r/turn-signal


Good luck with your riding. You might indicate your general location with your signature and there might be members to ride with near by.


You bought the best bike for starting a riding life. Dependable and the parts prices are reasonable.
 

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I just slightly disagree with above answer, but not much.

The Oil change recommended intervals are so long apart (my manual recommends 8K miles, but I go every 4k) that you will certainly need to oil the chain more often than than.

Most recommend 500 miles, but that is hard for me as I go that much on some trips or just several days of riding. But, 500 is a great benchmark.

Here is my disagreement. I recommend using Motul street bike chain lube, over the others. These o-ring type chains really don't need much lube - but do need cleaned pretty well. I find Motul does a great job. Also, get the product called "Grease Ninja" which is an applicator that really is neat for lubing the chain. It fits the can and then fits over the chain and puts the lube exactly where it needs to go rather than getting a lot of overspray which wastes the lube and gets on the tire, etc.

Finally you should be very pleased with the bike, especially the gas mileage. I get a bona-fide 70 MPG on my 2016 500F. I ride it easy and don't do much interstate, but back roads up through SC & NC for fun.


https://www.greaseninja.com/Chain-Lube-Accessory.html

It is so inexpensive that you will save just in the not wasting the lube.
 

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If you don't already have an owner's manual for your bike.. Honda offers a free PDF download. Lots of good info in there.. Along with some easy how-to's, all maintenance recommendations, fluid types and amounts. It's well worth taking a few hours reading through the manual to better familiarize yourself with your bike. And it will better answer some of your questions.. I have a link to Honda's site below. Just type in your bikes info. :nerd:

https://powersports.honda.com/downloads/owners-manuals
 

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I would put off replacing the fairings if you can. I take it from your post that you don't have a lot of mechanical experience and removing and replacing the fairings on an R model can be pretty tricky, especially without a service manual to find where all the fasteners are and the sequence for removal.
 

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I start and run it for 20 minutes after it’s warmed it when it’s too cold to take it for a ride and I use my battery tender so the battery doesn’t get angry with me.
This practice can be more damaging than you might think. "Warm" is not the same as getting the oil hot enough to boil off volatiles like unburnt gasoline and water condensates. By idling the engine for a while from cold, you add both to the oil and over time it accumulates and causes acids and sludges to form in the oil.

You're good with the tender (note, a battery tender, not a trickle charger...) to keep the battery charged. It's better to leave the engine off until you can ride it and get the coolant and oil up to temperature. If you plan on storing it for a long period of time consider adding some gasoline stabilizer to the fuel.

Also, if you're able to find it, run ethanol-free gasoline. If you can store it with a tank-full of zero-ethanol so much the better for the fuel system components.
 

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I'll just add my voice to the "don't just let it sit there idling" crowd. You need the engine to be spinning at a decent speed for the charging system to do much work anyway, and an engine will be a lot happier at 7k under load than it will with no load idling.
 

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On most of the 4-stroke bikes in my past, idling was not good - as it also didn't pump the oil well enough to make sure the upper end got lube.

When I start up on cold, I do like some idling to just get things flowing. I use LUCAS synthetic oil stabilizer as it is designed to "stick" to the metal as engine gets cold from the previous ride. Then, on cold start-ups, it lubricates very well prior to the oil flowing. Some have said that most wear on an engine is in this cold start period, and Lucas eliminates up to 90% of that wear.
 

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Yup - idling with an FI bike is not really necessary. Use synthetic oil for motorcycles - not cars - and you should be good. The reason for motorcycle specific oil is that your clutch is in an oil bath and car oils will cause it to slip. The reason for synthetic is that it keeps its weight rating longer so changes don't have to be as frequent.
 

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I would put off replacing the fairings if you can. I take it from your post that you don't have a lot of mechanical experience and removing and replacing the fairings on an R model can be pretty tricky, especially without a service manual to find where all the fasteners are and the sequence for removal.
Also, it is not unusual for a new-ish rider to drop their bike or have other minor scrapes. So if the damage is only cosmetic, it is not worth the cost of a replacement only for something else to happen.

On the other points, I keep my battery charged by riding it. Sometimes in winter I may go a month or more without riding it and the bike kept outside. The battery is still good to go when I get back on it.

And when the weather is colder I start my bike up before I set my GPS route, check the indicators and brake lights, take a sip of water, put my helmet on, make sure my bluetooth is working, get on the bike, and put my gloves on. That only takes a few minutes. In summer I would not start it until I am on the bike.

I realize our bikes come from the previous decade, but they are still pretty modern and in normal conditions you should not need to be spending time warming it up and doing things with the battery.

A little warming up is good, but a little is all it needs. And it also depends on whether you live on the edge of town where a minute from your front doo you will be highway speeds, in which case I would not want to ride without a a couple minutes warming up, or live in the middle of town where you first few miles will be slow and stop-start so everything will happen gradually anyway.

When I set off from home I only go a few yards before stopping to enter a gate code, then waiting for the gate to open. A few more yards then stopping to make sure it is safe to turn onto the a residential street. Then a hundred yards still before stopping to wait to join the main road. On a hot day I am not too concerned about warming up in advance.

(British roads are measured in miles and yards, I have confused Americans before by using yards in this context)
 

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Also, it is not unusual for a new-ish rider to drop their bike or have other minor scrapes. So if the damage is only cosmetic, it is not worth the cost of a replacement only for something else to happen.
(British roads are measured in miles and yards, I have confused Americans before by using yards in this context)
That's cause our powers to be have decided we have no need to comply with global standards concerning measures of weight or distance. Shucks, we don't even need to demonstrate the normally excepted standards of decency anymore. We're just happy to stay in our "own back yards", and pound rocks while the rest of the world catches up with us. >:)
 

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Yup - idling with an FI bike is not really necessary. Use synthetic oil for motorcycles - not cars - and you should be good. The reason for motorcycle specific oil is that your clutch is in an oil bath and car oils will cause it to slip. The reason for synthetic is that it keeps its weight rating longer so changes don't have to be as frequent.
Great advice!

I have proven over the years (esp. on my antiqu-e BMW motorcycle) in all my vehicles that LUCAS products really work.

In my 500F, I use Shell T6 which is Shell's diesel/mc version as Pennzoil Platinum (T6 is same as Pennzoil Platinum but Pennzoil Platinum is for autos only, and not good for wet m/c clutches, Pennzoil & Shell are same company). I also use LUCAS synthetic oil stabilizer but only with a 5% to 10% mix. This will NOT hurt the wet clutch issue. I also use LUCAS gasoline additive in ALL my vehicles on a regular basis all the time - at a 400:1 ratio. (3.2 oz to 10 gallons of fuel). In my old BMW (carbureted) it kept all the components "lubricated" and after I started using it, I used it for years and NEVER had one speck of debris in the fuel system ever again. I also use in my fuel injected car, and it keeps the injectors lubed and clean. In my autos, I get a good 5 mile per gallon better gas mileage that what was on the stickers when I bought the cars. In my Corolla, rated at 34 mpg, on trips, I got a guaranteed 40 mpg.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
If you don't already have an owner's manual for your bike.. Honda offers a free PDF download. Lots of good info in there.. Along with some easy how-to's, all maintenance recommendations, fluid types and amounts. It's well worth taking a few hours reading through the manual to better familiarize yourself with your bike. And it will better answer some of your questions.. I have a link to Honda's site below. Just type in your bikes info. /forum/images/CBR500Riders_2015/smilies/tango_face_glasses.png

https://powersports.honda.com/downloads/owners-manuals
Thanks for that I’m definitely downloading and spending the time to read it. My MOM wasn’t under the seat like I expected it to be
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I would put off replacing the fairings if you can. I take it from your post that you don't have a lot of mechanical experience and removing and replacing the fairings on an R model can be pretty tricky, especially without a service manual to find where all the fasteners are and the sequence for removal.
I have a fair amount of mechanical experience, just not on motorcycles. I’ve already replaced both of my turn signals since they were broken when I got them so I figured out that trickery lol.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Also, it is not unusual for a new-ish rider to drop their bike or have other minor scrapes. So if the damage is only cosmetic, it is not worth the cost of a replacement only for something else to happen....

(British roads are measured in miles and yards, I have confused Americans before by using yards in this context)
The damage is only cosmetic but since I have more experience now than when I slid (day 2 or 3 of riding) I’m wanting to get them replaced. I hate the way the scratches look and I highly doubt I’ll be dumping it again soon *knocks on wood*

One of the benefits of being in a military town...you get used to hearing yards and thinking “okay that’s approximately X distance” and thinking of shooting ranges LOL
 

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Any tips would be extremely helpful for me. There’s not many (read practically none) female bike clubs down here for us sport bike riders so asking dumb questions semi-anonymously doesn’t cause the anxiety it would asking the general populous in my area. Everyone here rides harleys or if they ride sport bikes I see more guys in uniform riding them than someone I feel comfortable talking to.
If you aren't fixated on a sport bike club and are interested in just riding safely with a social group then consider joining GWRRA (Gold Wing Road Riders Association) as an associate rider (i.e., don't own a Gold Wing). It only costs about $50 per year to be a member, and that typically allows you to participate in club functions which can occasionally include meals covered by the club (albeit, typically the club's are funded with 50/50's or donations I think so there is sort of an unwritten rule that you'd be paying into the club regularly, but if you do and how much you do is up to you). They're a family-friendly group. You won't be dragging knee or bursting ear drums with them, but you'll probably have a good time. Through happenstance I ended up in GWRRA from the start and they've been a welcoming source of experience and resources for me. The average age is probably 50 or 60, due in part to the price tag of a Wing, but if that doesn't bother you then go for it. You probably won't find a more friendly club. It has also taught me what my next bike should be. :spin
 

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There's a lot floating around the Internet about oils and additives and whatnot. I'm not specifically saying anybody is wrong, but I just run the same Mobil 1 synthetic 10W-30 in my bike that I run in my MB E350. Even absolutely smashing on the clutch doing wheelies and burnouts and junk it doesn't slip. I treat my CBR worse than any other vehicle I own and it doesn't care.

My Nissan D21 has 277k on it, I generally just mix all the partial bottles of oil on my shelf together and put in it, it's fine. My MB 190D has somewhere over 300k on it, just so y'all don't think I'm only running shiny new engines.

Ultimately as long as you change it regularly and you're pretty close to factory recommendations, you're gonna be fine. If you're running boost, have changed cams/valves/springs/etc. to get more revs, etc. oil choice becomes more critical but for a stock engine honestly there's not much to worry about.

I say all that to say, it's a cheap bike. Beat the crap out of it and have a good time. Pretty much every surface of my bike has damage, most from the PO but I've lowsided it once myself. As long as its functional, don't worry about it. You can have a lot more fun with something you aren't worried about scratching than something you've gotta keep pristine.
 
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