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Just to say what I do as I have been getting 68 to 72 MPG (USA) consistently since I got my bike from the dealer, new.

I also ride moderately and never aggressive, but I do go to the mountain roads of SC & NC so I do a lot of shifting and accelerating (moderately) and braking.

I am a HUGE believer in LUCAS gasoline additive - not just as a periodic fuel "cleaner" (which I think there are other products that do better like Techron or SeaFoam), but I use it regularly without fail. Since mile 1 in both my car and my Honda bike. It goes in at a 400:1 ratio, and I buy in gallon jugs from Summit Racing (also available at places like AutoZone). A gallon lasts me about 1 year - in my car (Toyota Corolla) my bike, and my lawnmowers.

I think it does wonders on fuel injected engines - keeping the fuel injectors clean AND lubricated. On my car, which was rated at 35 MPG (which ratings are typically too high!) I actually get 40 MPG on trips. I attribute that to the LUCAS.
 

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Cool. I appreciate your input. I'll definitely keep that in mind. There were days when I would hoon my previous bike and constantly ride the limits, but anymore I enjoy the ride more than the thrill of trying to hit the limits. Maybe I am showing my age more :)
 

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Cool. I appreciate your input. I'll definitely keep that in mind. There were days when I would hoon my previous bike and constantly ride the limits, but anymore I enjoy the ride more than the thrill of trying to hit the limits. Maybe I am showing my age more :)
It'll get worse (or better depending on how you look at it!) as you get older.

To be honest, I gave up those "thrills" just out of high school, and definitely after I had my first two small children! I didn't want them growing up without a dad.
 

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So the first part of my trip I got less than 200mi on the tank and it just got into the reserve. I tried to stick in 6th gear till I hit less than 45mph. When I got home I noticed a squeaking-ish sound from the front so maybe my caliper is sticking and causing some loss. Not sure. I plan on riding tomorrow and will have to fill up again and I'll have an idea of the mileage. Any suggestions on what to check?
 

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My neighbour couldn't resist the temptation to ride his bike since this covid19, so he did a 85 mile ride on main roads and steady of course, checked the computer and it returned 99.9 mpg, wow. Think the best I have done running in was 85mpg. He is on 2018 bike with 1,800 miles on the clock. The fuel here atm is 99p litre, normally £1.23 litre.
 

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Are you using Imperial gallons or US gallons for the mileage calculations? Sorry, to sound so stupid, I should be more versed in international measurements.. But I'm not.
 

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Not really an easy answer because of so many variables. Non-ethanol gasoline is available in some select locales, at a premium of about $1 - $1.25 (US) per gallon over the cost of 'ethanol blended gasoline'.. In my region, the oil industry standard is 'ethanol blended gasoline' containing up to 10% ethanol... Regular 87 octane: I purchased last week for $1.89/US gallon. This is lower than it's been in years due to decreased demand caused by the Covid Virus. Six months ago, probably $2.69/US gallon. Our prices will also vary from State to State based on the amount of 'state fuel taxes'. In some cases drive a few miles and cross a State line to fuel up and save maybe $.20 per gallon. The oil companies and our governments are similar.. They like to keep us confused and guessing.. what's next?
 

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At the moment petrol sold here is 5% ethanol, but the British government are currently consulting on introducing 10% ethanol petrol to the U.K.


Earlier this year petrol stations introduced new labelling on pumps to which show the composition of fuels. The labels are an E.U. legislation, even though the U.K. is no longer a member. But as the same cars are sold in the U.K. and Ireland, manufacturers will be using these labels anyway. They also help prepare for 10% ethanol fuel.

So now petrol pumps have circle for petrol containing E5, obviously for 5% ethanol. Diesel pumps have a square containing B7 for 7% biodiesel.

Also 91 octane "regular" petrol was phased out many years ago. As is often the case the octane ratings are different in North America (and some other countries) to most of the world so 91 RON here is equivalent to 87 R+M/2 in the U.S.

So "premium" is our basic regular petrol at 95 RON / 90 R+M/2, this is why the government consultation refers to E10 being used for premium grade. E5 would still be sold for "super" grade petrol which is either 97 or 99 RON / 92 or 93 R+M/2.

For a short while one of the companies sold 102 RON / 98 R+M/2 in some of their stations, but it was more than double the cost of super and only beneficial to a tiny minority as only race cars and bikes could taker advantage of it.

Because Tesco used to sell their 99p RON petrol for only 5p more than premium, I once did a trial with my bike to see if it made a difference. The result from both are based on eleven consecutive fillings at a Tesco station.

On 95 RON I averaged 78.05 mpg at 7.04p per mile with a best tank of 79.34 mpg at 6.93p per mile.
On 99 RON I averaged 81.54 mpg at 7.02p per mile with a best tank of 86.96 mpg at 6.58p per mile.

So it did make a difference, but mainly in terms of distance possible on a tank rather than price. And the financial benefit was only because of the small price difference between the grades at Tesco. In most places the added cost of super is much greater that standard would be much better value, and I think even Tesco now has increased their difference.
 

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Every study I've read shows less MPG using ethanol blended fuels, whether it's gasoline or diesel. It boils down to BTUs available in the fuel. Un-blended gasoline or diesel provides more bang than any ethanol blend. This causes a bit of a catch 22. While blended fuels may be kinder to the environment, it requires more fuel by volume to reach the same distance traveled. All good for farmers, not so good for motorists.
 
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