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Discussion Starter #1
I'm still having issues with this bike being so low to the ground. I gained about 1.5" doing the GSXR 750 rear shock swap and putting on a proper size rear tire (PO had a smaller rear tire on it for some reason), but I'm still dragging peg pretty regularly. I took the bolts off the bottom of the pegs to get a little bit more lean before it drags but even with that I've got about a half inch of chicken strip left on the tire. Are these bikes just not designed to be able to lean that far or is something weird going on?
 

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If you are a heavier rider you can gain a small/modest amount more by going to a stiffer front spring matched to your weight.

Check your have the preload adjusted correctly for your weight on the GSXR shock. Might be sagging more than needed.

Consider that the chicken strip width depends on tire pressure. Many of us run less than the factory rear pressure which is for full load.

I believe the max lean topic has come up in other threads - you can check.
 

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+1 on the rearsets swap. It won't feel quite right without clip-ons too. My current setup just had some eBay specials $140 rearsets and $40 for 1" raised clip-ons that I frankensteined the OEM inner weights into to subdue vibrations. Feels like a true sport bike with the more aggressive prone position, you will feel more confident leaning it over further, way beyond what stock config can do
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Cool, thanks guys. I'll look into the ebay ones. I don't really want to spend $500 on a $2400 bike but $140 doesn't seem too bad.
 

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These generic SATO knockoffs on eBay worth anything?
Yep those are the ones I got (black ones). The price I mentioned was in AUD, so yeah about that once converted to USD.

Install was pretty straight forward, only three thing that caught me out:
1) the brake light actuator spring. It IS actually the correct length, you just need to rotate the silver plate it attaches to at the top to find the correct angle.
2) Make sure to locktight every bolt.
3) From (2) I must've forgot to do the gear shift lever stub and it fell off somewhere near Timbucktoo. I improvised with a random bolt, a couple nuts, a piece of old fuel line, and some heatshrink... the bolt I used was slightly too long and scored the base plate.

One thing I will add, is that the pegs are solid fit like most aftermarket ones, i.e. they don't fold up with spring action like the stock ones. I anticipated this and order these pegs while I was at it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Sweet, thanks man. I just sold some of my old networking equipment so I think I'll pick up one of these and a set of those pegs.
 

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Yep those are the ones I got (black ones). The price I mentioned was in AUD, so yeah about that once converted to USD.

Install was pretty straight forward, only three thing that caught me out:
1) the brake light actuator spring. It IS actually the correct length, you just need to rotate the silver plate it attaches to at the top to find the correct angle.
2) Make sure to locktight every bolt.
3) From (2) I must've forgot to do the gear shift lever stub and it fell off somewhere near Timbucktoo. I improvised with a random bolt, a couple nuts, a piece of old fuel line, and some heatshrink... the bolt I used was slightly too long and scored the base plate.

One thing I will add, is that the pegs are solid fit like most aftermarket ones, i.e. they don't fold up with spring action like the stock ones. I anticipated this and order these pegs while I was at it.
no, we ordered these ones back then: https://nobunaka.com/product/cbr400r-cbr500r-adjustable-rearsets :D but yeah, they look the same :)
 

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no, we ordered these ones back then: <<Nobunaka>> :D but yeah, they look the same :)
Yeah had those, converted my bike back to stock ergos when I was doing plenty of commuting and sold them and the clip-ons. Then months later had seller's remorse and wanted to go back but couldn't affort the Nobunaka's so bought the cheaper ebay ones. I do miss the GP shift of the nobunakas though ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I'm trying to actually follow a budget in 2020, once I've paid my latest Walther off I'll snag a set of those guys. I went ahead and bout the pegs you recommended so those will be ready to go on when I get the rear sets.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Ordered the rear set today. Will keep this thread updated with results.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Rear sets came in. They look pretty great, but of course came with no instructions. I contacted the seller and they don't have any. I can probably figure it out, but if any of you guys that actually bought the SATO ones happen to have a PDF or something of the install instructions you wouldn't mind sending I'd appreciate it. I'm making a video of the install process for anybody else that wants to put these on.
 

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Sorry can't help on a pdf, but install is pretty straight forward as all things pretty much only go one way. I referenced the eBay listing images just to make sure I had things the right way around.

Locktight the pegs on first
(Don't forget to locktight EVERY nut and bolt)

Do the gear shift side first as it's the easiest.

  • Install the peg plates on the furthest back and lowest setting, adjust later if needed.
  • Loosely install the great shift plate, as you'll need to assess which bolt hole to use for the shifter pivot point. (Mine is on top-front)
  • Install shifter shaft, choose hole that gives straightest path... Between the pivot point bolt and this one will be a bit of a post to find which one works for you.
  • Check position of shifter stub to toe
  • Adjust shifter shaft position/length to suit... Will be different for you as I have a Quickshifter and adjustment is a little different.
give it all a tighten, but not super tight until after a test ride

The brake side
A little different as you assemble it mostly off the bike before installing
  • Retain the small spring from the original assembly for the lever return (if your kit didn't come with one)
  • Swap the brake master cylinder over
  • Attach the brake lever
  • Undo the locknut on the master cylinder and wind the actuator bolt in leaving a couple mm free
  • Attach lever to actuator
  • Install bolt for spring return
  • Screw in the brake light switch to the silver 90deg plate
  • Attach long spring for brake switch to same bolt for the lever return (you may need to rotate the silver plate to get correct length)
  • Attach short spring for the lever return
  • Install assembly on bike
  • Lever reach adjustment is done on via the master cylinder bolts, adjust as needed
Might take a little bit to find the right position for the levers, but once done you should be grinning from ear to ear :D

... Pretty sure that's how I did it anyway, it has been quite a few months since I installed them.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Ok yeah mine didn't come with most of the hardware installed, it was just some aluminum chunks and a bag of random hardware. I found a PDF on Sato's website that has a diagram of how its supposed to be assembled. I think between that and tothezenith's post I can get this sorted out. Thanks TTZ!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I got these installed last week. It required a little modification to get it to fit but everything works great. I put 300 miles down yesterday in the twisties in TN and the difference is HUGE! I'm most impressed by how shifting is improved. It's so much easier to do clutchless shifts, even from 1 to 2. Shifting is nice and clicky, finding neutral is easy, it's just a great upgrade. After 300 miles all the bolts are still in, so I think the loctite is probably holding everything together well. I'll continue to keep an eye on it every once and a while to make sure nothing is walking out. I need to adjust the brake lever a bit, right now it's a bit too far down. I took some hairpins that I always drug peg on before at about 5mph faster than usual and had no dragging. I didn't find the max lean angle on these guys yet, so I look forward to pushing it further!

Installation video will be coming soon, have 8gb of clips to cut and edit lol.

72092

72093
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Just wanted to update this thread in case anyone finds it in the future. You can see in the pictures above how much "chicken strip" was left on the back tire before switching to the Sato clone rearsets. I haven't really smashed on this bike much since picking up the GSX-S, but I've taken it out and romped on it a couple times and thought it was worth an update. I did have to trim the kickstand a bit, as it would drag when turning hard to the left, but with the Sato clones I'm able to make full use of all the rubber on the Michelin Pilot Road 5 tires I'm running. If you ride your 500 hard, definitely change the rearsets out. I'm running a GSXR 750 rear shock. The big weak point now is the front suspension. On tight corners with a lot of camber, the front suspension will fully bottom out (I'm 225lb as well, so that doesn't help) which is sketchy.



Ultimately, if you really want to rip and can (financially or legally) buy a bigger bike I think that's the better option, but you can have a lot of fun with these little guys with a couple hundred bucks and a little time.
 

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I'm still having issues with this bike being so low to the ground. I gained about 1.5" doing the GSXR 750 rear shock swap and putting on a proper size rear tire (PO had a smaller rear tire on it for some reason), but I'm still dragging peg pretty regularly. I took the bolts off the bottom of the pegs to get a little bit more lean before it drags but even with that I've got about a half inch of chicken strip left on the tire. Are these bikes just not designed to be able to lean that far or is something weird going on?
The ergonomics are such that you sit in an upright position rather than a sportier position on a "sport bike". The 500 is about comfort. How your dragging your pegs is a mystery, besides you can just remove them. No the lean angle is different per bike class, the 600 being better, then of course the litre racing bikes. Maybe you just stink at riding.
 

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Is the problem actually prohibiting you from cornering, or is it just the chicken strips that are bothering you? Chicken strips can be a sign of good body positioning on the street. You need less lean angle when you're moving around on the bike properly. This just sounds to me like you're going on a quest to make a really comfortable bike, less comfortable, to satisfy some type of squid fallacy.
 

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Depends which tyres you use some are easier than others to remove the chicken strips. Put a sports tyre on and then try again.
 
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