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AFAIK there is not any other bike or scooter made that can do 80+ MPH highway speeds so easily, all day, while getting 70+ MPG. The CB(R)500 stands on top of everything else.

I believe the NM4 gets close (at least on paper) but still can't beat it (not to mention price).

If there is anything else that can match it then I'm interested because I know a few people looking for new bikes and they're having having a **** of a time finding nice used CBR500's but they want what it provides.
 

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NC700 regularly gets touted for that; comfortable, sports tourer with great (~60mpg) fuel economy (still not as good as the 500). But with its semi-auto box it also gets shamed as being uninspiring.
The 650 V-Strom also a good contender, regularly gets pitted against the 500X in comparos; again with ~50-55mpg it's still a way off from the miser of these 500s.
There's rumors in the Yamaha camp for a 2016 competitor for our bike, though nothing really has been substantiated from those whispers.
 

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A Burgman 400 can get close to those numbers. MPG would be more like 65 and it can do 80mph{although not much more than that}. From what I have heard the Burgman 650 can do 80 easily and still get 60MPG on the highway. Of coarse they are a totally different animals but if you are only looking at those numbers they come close.
 

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I would think the Nc750 would be difficult to beat as a pure commuter. Fast enough, great MPG, understressed engine (so, reliable) and a trunk space to keep your stuff in.

Also ugly and dull enough it will never get stolen.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
80mph all day while getting 70+ mpg? I'm sure those numbers are exaggerated. Combined mileage puts me at 50-53 and I do a lot of highway.
Not exaggerated, that is my actual every day mileage. If I do all highway (60-80 MPH for the whole tank) then I get 68-71 MPG. Mostly city riding in the summer with short trips of just a few miles give me between 64 and 66 MPG. Short trips in the winter is worst and I have seen it as low as 60 MPG (that was a whole tank of short 1-2 mile trips in January).

You can't use the computer on the bike, it's WAY off (eg. 50-53). Calculate your actual mileage yourself (apps like Fuelly make it easy). Make sure to always fill the bike in the same position too (for example either always on the kickstand or always upright because that changes the amount of fuel when you refill).
 

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80mph all day while getting 70+ mpg? I'm sure those numbers are exaggerated. Combined mileage puts me at 50-53 and I do a lot of highway.
Agreed. I only have managed to get 61mpg on the readout doing a steady 45mph or less. Of course YMMV but as with cars the fuel economy specified is likely only under specific circumstances which I am sure does not include a 200# rider, riding at speeds we tend to ride at.

I get the same mileage as you, maybe a tad more, doing a combination of 70mph freeway and traffic.
 

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You can't use the computer on the bike, it's WAY off (eg. 50-53).
I did hear multiple reports of this and am yet to calculate it but laziness is a problem. :)

But I find out hard to believe it is that way off. Maybe so.
 

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Not exaggerated, that is my actual every day mileage. If I do all highway (60-80 MPH for the whole tank) then I get 68-71 MPG. Mostly city riding in the summer with short trips of just a few miles give me between 64 and 66 MPG. Short trips in the winter is worst and I have seen it as low as 60 MPG (that was a whole tank of short 1-2 mile trips in January).

You can't use the computer on the bike, it's WAY off (eg. 50-53). Calculate your actual mileage yourself (apps like Fuelly make it easy). Make sure to always fill the bike in the same position too (for example either always on the kickstand or always upright because that changes the amount of fuel when you refill).
I do use that method. Take the miles for that trip and divide by the gallons put into the tank on fill up and that gives you mpg for that trip. Maybe there's some other major factors that contribute to the difference in our gas mileage. Maybe it's the difference in the R and X model.
I've been wanting the CBR650F for a really long time to take over commuting, but looking at the gas mileage, the 500 is really the perfect bike for my lifestyle. The NC700 really is ugly and a tad tall.
 

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80mph all day while getting 70+ mpg? I'm sure those numbers are exaggerated. Combined mileage puts me at 50-53 and I do a lot of highway.


Im in the 50-55 range 25 mile commute. 55-35 mph roads. Typically run 65-70 on the two lanes and I like to get up and go quickly. Not concerned about MPG since it does so good.
 

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^^confirmed, and there are numerous threads discussing fuel mileage on here, which only backs up the data found on the fuelly.com website for hundreds of riders of our bikes logging ACTUAL calculated values. And yes the dash values are inaccurate, as discussed in those other threads too. The consensus is that all-round average consumption is in the mid-60s mpg, with some (including myself) having recorded in excess of 80mpg during econo runs.
 

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I own a 2012 Honda NC700X and also a 2015 500R. Personally, if I had to commute, I would choose the 700X. The visibility is better overall on the 700 due to the height and seating position. It has a large lockable storage compartment, you can add handguards to keep your hands warmer and drier, you can add a higher windshield for better protection from the elements, it has about the same performance and handling capabilities as a 500, but does things in a more relaxed manner (80mph is only about 4000 rpm), the fuel mileage is about 15% better, and visibility is much better in the rear view mirrors.
Although I never found the 700 bland (it has a unique character that grows on you), the 500 is definitely more engaging to ride, has a much better stock seat, and better headlights.
 

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both great bikes. linear (uninspired or "always torque-ready"?) powerband, comfortable, and great mileage. if I wrecked my R today I'd buy whichever one I could get a deal on.
 

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^^confirmed, and there are numerous threads discussing fuel mileage on here, which only backs up the data found on the fuelly.com website for hundreds of riders of our bikes logging ACTUAL calculated values. And yes the dash values are inaccurate, as discussed in those other threads too. The consensus is that all-round average consumption is in the mid-60s mpg, with some (including myself) having recorded in excess of 80mpg during econo runs.
Best I've gotten was 75mpg on a long trip, up mountains, and NOT econo....I was flogging it on numerous occasions.
My overall average logged on Fuelly is 60.9mpg (US). I do a lot of long freeway rides at greater than legal speeds, under windy conditions, so it drags my average down.
 

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I can also attest that the computer on the bike is waay off. By that I mean it shows much worse mileage (i.e. higher fuel consumption) than actual. So to the person who said they would have run out of fuel if it was that off - no actually, on the contrary, it just means you definitely don't run out and in fact have quite a bit left in the bike when you go to fill up. Also I hope you guys don't forget that mpg in the UK and US is different, and since not everyone states where they come from the numbers can be confusing.


Agree with those who said the NC is an obvious commuter choice, it does better mileage, and has the storage. On the other hand the 500 is cheaper, and more fun (to me) to ride.
 
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Yes, the NC is roughly $2000 more than the 500R here in Canada. A large part of that difference is because the NC is built in Japan.
 

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I owned a Suzuki V-Strom (DL650) as my first bike. It got decent mileage but I was constantly whacking the throttle for kicks and my gas mileage was always in the low 40's because of it. It was a good bike though and I miss it at times.

The 500R stands alone from what I can tell. We are trying to find a bike for my son to start on in the next couple years and there really isn't anything that checks all the boxes like the Honda 500's.
 

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Here's my take on long distance commuting ----- lane splitting.

It is legal in some places and it is legal where I live. I commute approx. 120 miles per day, some days I do 240 miles and more.

That is a lot of distance to cover in a car let alone a bike and while fuel mileage matters, handling matters more to me. I like the cbr500r as it is stable at high speeds and can handle lane splitting very well. Yesterday I spent a good 200 miles total lane splitting, that is 200 miles of riding between cars and hoping one of them does not cut me off. The only other bike I have that can handle that type of abuse is my Triumph Street Triple.

The Triple only gets 40 mpg, but it is fast, sits you upright, can handle like a supermoto or sport bike depending on how you pushed it and is probably even more comfortable than the cbr500r. I find that most cruiser or bigger bikes are just not built for the kind of traffic I deal with. So my stable right now has 3 bikes:

CBR500r
SH150i
Street Triple
 

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Vetter Fuel Economy Challenge July 8 7AM Prove it!

I'm not allowed to post a new thread. Older members please help me as you can by reposting, promoting this communication, etc. even if this post get deleted.

I'm a CTX700 owner / rider and think that I have the ultimate commuter bike, and would like to prove it, but don't care to be proven wrong. Please help prove me wrong!

Please bring your CB500 bike to the Mid-Ohio Vetter Fuel Challenge Saturday, July 8 at 7 am at or near the Splash Harbor Hotel, Bellville, OH and help me bring some stock bikes to the competition so that we can compete against each other; and you CB500 owners can try and prove that you have the ultimate commuter bike. I probably can't leave a link, so I'll do it this way. Details at schultengineering dot us dot com.

Please forgive me if this is slightly against the forum rules. I don't mean to hijack the thread, but I joined this forum only to make an announcement to encourage CB500 model bike owners to come and prove that their bikes are the ultimate commuter bikes by coming and riding in the Mid-Ohio Vetter Fuel Challenge. We cannot compete for the crown unless we can pack 4 big grocery bags into our luggage fully contained, but we can still compete against each other for pride. Please come; please spread the word.

In 2014, I took this same CTX700 to this same competition and some how scored 101.82 mpg; coming in well above the other stock bikes; well above my own best record; only difference being that I tucked during this ride. I beat the next-best stock bike by 21 mpg; an older DR200; and came within 1.5 mpg of a fully streamlined Helix, but there were only four stock bikes that were seriously trying to do well, and none of them but mine was a modern bike with modern engine technology. I'd like some real competition this time, and NO; I don't expect to score anything like that this time around; not sure what happened that day, but hope to get in the mid to upper 80s and I'd like to see how a similarly configured CB500 variant can do against me as well as some 250s and 300s and BMW 650s and BMW 800.

Greg Faulkner; Rickman, TN; 2014 CTX700. Check out Craig Vetter's webiste and see the result for the Mid-Ohio event in 2014. That's me with my name and bike listed at the top of the non qualifier list. I'm coming back and would like some company.
 
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