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Hi all, name's O (central NJ).

First off, delete if thread not allowed here. I have never used forums before.

I bought my first bike yesterday from my best friend, a 2014 CBR500R w/ ABS in black (601 miles). Currently waiting on a HotBodies flush-mounted turn signal kit, DanMoto XG-1 slip-on w/ "mid pipe", and an OEM passenger seat delete cowl.

Gear wise I got a helmet, jacket, gloves. Should I wear ear plugs once the XG-1 goes on? or is the helmet's padding enough?

I'm looking forward to learning a lot about the bike, so if anyone has the same bike please feel free to add me on instagram @onisealavidze . I would love to have people I can reach out to and exchange knowledge with.

Thanks for the add.
 

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Welcome.

The reason to use ear plugs when riding is because of wind noise. Once you get up to speed you might not even be able to hear the bike over it.

Personally I always wear earplugs, but I wear a flip helmet so it has poorer sound isolation than a full face one. Aside from protecting my hearing, it is just a lot more comfortable riding with that constant noise toned down. It also makes it easier to hear other noises, likes sirens and horns.

I would say just go out and ride on a fast road, then you will quickly know the answer. Take some cheap foam plugs in case you need them. You can invest in better ones later if necessary, and keep the foam ones in a pocket or under the rear seat as a backup.

Also, for gear make sure you have protective pants too. I do wear thick jeans when riding around town where the limit is 30 mph at most, but even that is a blanked risk. If the worst does happen and you end up sliding along the road then ordinary jeans will do nothing to protect your legs.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Welcome.

The reason to use ear plugs when riding is because of wind noise. Once you get up to speed you might not even be able to hear the bike over it.

Personally I always wear earplugs, but I wear a flip helmet so it has poorer sound isolation than a full face one. Aside from protecting my hearing, it is just a lot more comfortable riding with that constant noise toned down. It also makes it easier to hear other noises, likes sirens and horns.

I would say just go out and ride on a fast road, then you will quickly know the answer. Take some cheap foam plugs in case you need them. You can invest in better ones later if necessary, and keep the foam ones in a pocket or under the rear seat as a backup.

Also, for gear make sure you have protective pants too. I do wear thick jeans when riding around town where the limit is 30 mph at most, but even that is a blanked risk. If the worst does happen and you end up sliding along the road then ordinary jeans will do nothing to protect your legs.
I appreciate all the advice, and I will be heeding all of it as well.
 

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Earplugs for you, my friend. I began riding in 1953 and did not begin to wear earplugs for 30 years after. I realized that the wind noise past my helmet made my enjoyment of riding much less than late with the foam ear plugs. I wear hearing aids now (not when riding) as my hearing is "moderately to severely" impaired. Please; wear ear plugs.
Ralph
 

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Nice score, finding a 2014 with just 600 miles on it.

++ for earplugs. I won't ride without them.
 

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Ear Plugs ! And Boots, preferable motorcycle boots, but boots of some sort for Ankle/foot/toe protection.
Enjoy the bike, but put the mods on the back seat until you get some riding experience and some more safety gear.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Earplugs for you, my friend. I began riding in 1953 and did not begin to wear earplugs for 30 years after. I realized that the wind noise past my helmet made my enjoyment of riding much less than late with the foam ear plugs. I wear hearing aids now (not when riding) as my hearing is "moderately to severely" impaired. Please; wear ear plugs.
Ralph
wow... as a 22 year old we tend to think we're superhuman. I appreciate the warnings. they'll be in my shopping cart this weekend.
 

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Ear Plugs ! And Boots, preferable motorcycle boots, but boots of some sort for Ankle/foot/toe protection.
Enjoy the bike, but put the mods on the back seat until you get some riding experience and some more safety gear.
2 words: Redwing Heritage ;)


As for the mods, just some pipes to make other drivers aware and flush mounted blinkers because I'm sorry but the stock ones are just TOOOO ugly. Also got the rear seat delete as to deter people who want rides.
 

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Nice score, finding a 2014 with just 600 miles on it.

++ for earplugs. I won't ride without them.
Long story short the kid bought it new and got scared of it after a close call. threw it in the garage for years and my best friend took it off his hands for next to nothing. the following week he just transferred title to me. I could not turn down a 600 mile bike for less than 3000USD. regardless of make/model.
 

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Generally, loud pipes do not actually add any safety benefit.

The first problem is that other road users will not hear you until you are close to them. So if catching up with a slower vehicle you will be overtaking before they know what is happening.

Also one of the worst things you can do is spook drivers when you have little reaction time yourself. A different situation, but one time I was riding when a right-turning car turned out of a side street to my left. As soon as the driver saw me approaching they suddenly braked whilst sitting across my lane (as we drive on the left) causing me to have to take action.

The point being that when people panic we do instinctively do silly things before thinking. A driver who is not already checking their mirror and generally being aware of what is happening around them will not immediately know where that noise has suddenly come from, and may do something stupid.

Another problem with loud pipes is that they emit a tonal noise which echos arounds and so is difficult to locate the source. Which is what you want, otherwise it would not be heard by anyone in front of you. But it means when a driver hears a noise they will not know where it is coming from until they see the source. So even if I had a loud exhaust on that occasion I mentioned above, the driver would have not know if I was approaching, departing, or on a parallel road behind them, that they would likely not have acted any differently. Particular given I was plenty visible enough.

It is, incidentally, why the recommend artificial noise for electric cars is a mixture of tonal sounds (the sort made by combustion engines) and broadband ones. The latter being a type which are easily locatable and also have the ability of being discernible in noisy environments. Some makers also use directional speakers, connected to the steering system, so the noise is only directed at those in the vehicles path to reduce the overall noise pollution. It will be interesting to see how all of this gets applied to electric bikes.

The other main argument against "loud pipes save lives" is it gives a rider a false sense of security. They take more risks by assuming that everyone will be aware of them. Of course this is a matter of attitude, and you can still ensure you ride defensively to protect yourself. But as probably the most important rule is to act as though no one can see you, then what is the safety value of a loud exhaust?

Another rule of defensive riding is to always make yourself visible. No country allows blind people to drive. But most countries allow deaf people to drive, the majority which do not are in Africa and the Middle East. They may make up a tiny minority of road users, but that makes no difference if the one time you encounter one it ends up in an accident because you expected them to hear you. Defensive riding means you have to assume no one will hear your exhaust. Not just because a driver may be deaf, they may just have the radio at full volume and screaming children in the back seat.

And a completely different consideration, but bikes that are too loud in urban areas just tend to annoy people. A lot. They also have negative health impacts both in terms of hearing loss from noisy environments and as a cause of stress.

In France they are developing a technology using a combination of microphones and cameras to catch people who exceed noise limits. In Germany they have simply banned bikes on some local roads which are popular with bikers just because of the noise. There has even been consideration there to banning the sale of after-market exhausts.

The American Motorcyclist Association which campaigns for the rights of bikers are also against loud exhausts simply because that one issue turns so many people against bikes that it makes it more difficult for them to fight regulation in other areas too.

Anyway, the safety benefits of loud pipes is overstated and you can not, and more importantly should not, depend on one to save you. What will protect you far more is simply to not ride like a pillock.
 

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Mostly, they just piss-off your neighbors. And you'll have a harder time sneaking back into your driveway, when you're later than you should have been. ;)
 
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