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I bought a 2013 CBR500F in mid-summer of 2012 (I wanted an X, but they'd already sold the only two they'd been allocated). It's nicely set up - Corbin seat, Hepco and Becker brackets for side bags, Ogio small bags and tail bag for when I'm not using it as a grocery-getter, Rox riser for my aching lumbar, wired properly for a trickle charger and USB, etc. 1,100 miles, garaged for most of it's life and under a fitted cover when it wasn't. It's a cherry.

When 2013 came around I developed a neurological disorder called tension tremors which also affect balance, meaning I've turned over at a dead stop a couple of times; but when I get it to counter-steering speeds I'm as fast or faster than the average rider. I think I could ride again with the addition of front "crash" bars to help me upright the bike more easily if I do indeed turn it over at a stop light/sign. However ... in the time between then and now I've had some other debilitaing health problems, and I left old gas in it. It will crank easily, but it won't fire. I suspect that the injectors are clogged, but I'm no mechanic by anyone's definition.

How do I get this back on the road again? What do I do with the old gas I need to drain, and what gas additives do I need to add in hope of clearing the injectors? I'm a babe in the woods here, this is beyond what I know as previously I'd only wrenched on simply two-stroke MX bikes.
 

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Even with a trickle charger being used, I'd guess a 7 plus year old battery is toast.
You can bring it for load testing to make sure.
Might also get flooded easily. Pull out a spark plug to check if its wet with gas.
Also sitting for that long it might just take a long amount of cranking to get it to start!
 

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I agree with the comment about the battery.

When you drain the gas, you may see water droplets from condensation (inside the gas tank) over all these years. Water sinks to the bottom of the tank.
Can't start an engine if feeding the injectors mostly water!

Will need to crank enough to pass the fresh gasoline all the way to the fuel injectors. Honda says 5 second max crank with 10 second rest.

Once you get the engine running and warmed up, I suggest an oil change, again because condensation over all these years may have caused water build-up in the oil.

Old gas: some areas have hazardous waste disposal sites for public use. Or sweet-talk your local small engine repair shop - they drain old gas from mowers, etc. all the time.
 

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When gasoline, especially with ethanol added, is allowed to sit for much over 6 months, it turns to a gel or varnish that easily will clog the tiny orifices in your engine's injector nozzles. These likely will have to be removed and sent out for ultrasonic cleaning.

Before you do this, try spraying a bit of "starting fluid", available at auto stores, into the air cleaner housing of your bike. This stuff is highly flammable and if your engine has a spark it will fire. Whether or not the engine continues to run depends on whether or non your fuel pump is working (you can hear this just by turning the ignition key "ON") and if your injector nozzles are not plugged.

When you drain the fuel tank, be aware of water in the gas, as has been stated above. It's not just a matter of getting the non-flammable water out; there may be a badly rusted fuel tank bottom to deal with. If that condition exists, you'll need to remove the tank and fuel pump assembly and clean the inside of the tank with vinegar (how to on Internet videos) and coat the tank with alcohol-resistant coating. My favorite coating is Bill Hirsch FAA-approved fuel tank coating. Used on an old Norton Commando tank recently. Really bad pin-holes, sealed it just fine with two applications.

Best wishes for remission of your neurological disorder. They can be difficult to get a handle on.

Ralph
 
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