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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone do their own maintenance? Or plan to do their own on the CBR500?

Things like changing tires, brakes, oil, lubricating parts. Replacing things. :cool::confused:
 

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I saw on another thread and everybody seems to be bringing their bike to the mechanic or dealer to have them serviced and maintained. The farthest I have gone is changing the oil and cleaning and lubricating the chain. I dont trust myself to replace things and would leave that to someone with more experience and knowledge. Two things i would never consider to replace is the chain and brakes. If a chain wee to come loose the first thing thats coming off is your leg, acting like a chain saw. Just narly. And brakes I wouldnt want to screw with because if it fails, ka plunk and see yah.
 

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If you plan to do much you do need to order the shop manual. I try to do the routine maintenance; the worst item to date was stripping the head and cams when replacing the shims (under bucket) doing the NX250's valve adjustment.

Also, I am old and lazy. My local independent bike shop charges $15/wheel to install tires that you order from them (they are price competitive) so I remove the wheels and take them to the shop when it is time for a new tire or two.

Being retired permits me to consider my bikes to be "hobbies", so there is sufficient time to do the work. However, I would rather be riding than wrenching.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
For jobs that take too long I do take them to a shop. Unless I have a weekend when I am totally free and can't ride anyways (raining or bad weather)

For small things like oil changes I actually enjoy doing. It doesn't take long and I like to know that the bike is getting good treatment from me by the means of fresh oil :)
 

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I would like to work on my bike but its really hard to find time especially after work having to deal with the small one. I'd rather get it done at a shop, experience and knowledge = less screw ups and wait time. I take a ride whenever I get the chance, wait times are killer. Can't wait for the weather to clear up over here.
 

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Not me I have a barn just for the bikes. Started working on bike with my father ever since I was a teen. There is really nothing to it as long as your somewhat mechanically inclined. And newer bikes these day are not as tricky as before. Carburetors bikes were a pain in the arse to start back then but still appreciate them so much.
 

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Not me I have a barn just for the bikes. Started working on bike with my father ever since I was a teen. There is really nothing to it as long as your somewhat mechanically inclined. And newer bikes these day are not as tricky as before. Carburetors bikes were a pain in the arse to start back then but still appreciate them so much.
your so lucky to have the space and time. What kinds of work or maintenance have you done on motorcycles? I've heard a fare share of stories of the older bikes that wouldn't start once if the air was moist or while it's raining. Glad we don't have to deal with that now.

Do you have any pictures of you barn/garage where you work on your bikes? ;)
 

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I'll be doing the simple maintenance on the thing. And I would like to do all my own servicing in the future and develop shop skills, I was thinking of buying an old dirt bike for that.

But trying to re-sell a bike like this that 'only I've worked on' might be tricky. I plan on keeping the CBR for about 2 yrs before upgrading to a Super Sport and it'll be easier to sell if the shop babied it, rather then my unskilled hands.

Plus I'd need to buy a shitload of new gear.
 

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I'll be doing the simple maintenance on the thing. And I would like to do all my own servicing in the future and develop shop skills, I was thinking of buying an old dirt bike for that.

But trying to re-sell a bike like this that 'only I've worked on' might be tricky. I plan on keeping the CBR for about 2 yrs before upgrading to a Super Sport and it'll be easier to sell if the shop babied it, rather then my unskilled hands.

Plus I'd need to buy a shitload of new gear.
Learning to service your own bike is key, not only does it help cut down cost but it also makes you understand just exactly how things work on your bike. You'll pick up small things here and there when you pay close attention, some things like look at how your brake pads are wearing when you take them out from the calipers. These things you will never see if you get your bike serviced at the dealership. But it's always best if your somewhat mechanically inclined.

The benefit for getting your bike serviced at the dealership or the shop is that you get receipts and invoices which can be used as a sales pitch to potential buys showing them you keep it maintained giving them a piece of mind.
 

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Part of that can be overcome by keeping copies of the parts orders and photos of the work.

As I prefer to buy a used bike, I expect to take it pretty much apart to: inspect brake pads/drums; bleed the brakes; replace the spark plug(s); add an inline fuel filter between the tank and carb/injectors; replace the coolant if the bike isn't air cooled; Check the valve adjustment; and often, replace the chain and sprockets. Sometimes, electrical work is needed too. That is pretty much what it takes to make it safe to ride. Buying the shop manual before starting makes this much easier.
 

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valve adjustments and changing sprockets can be tricky even if you have a shop manual sometimes. although it does help but I wouldn't take the risk unless you have some extensive experience dealing with bikes. On the plus side if you bring it to the dealership you can have the work orders as a record for the next buyer of your bike like NSR_Devil said.
 

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in Thailand, we have to follow the service intervals specified by the manual and they need to be done only in Honda Bigwing shop otherwise, you burn your warranty.
Besides, i have no time to even for an oil change as a corporate drone so i will let Honda do all for me and teh good thing is their mechanics are trained in Japan and they are nice people so no problems for me.
 

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Personally would do regular oil & filter changes and of course lubing the chain after a clean etc. Any more then that I would seek expert assistance.

Would be usefully if someone had the time to post some pictures / write up of what they have done for us novices to follow ideally :)
 

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Mr loser... Mr Lazer? when I picked up my bike from big wing I was pretty impressed with their shop, and I agree everyone there seems very friendly and helpful. But I asked what the wattage was on the charging system. The mechanic thought for just a second and said "14 volts" The service manager (REAL nice guy and good english) had no idea what I was talking about. He said I think about one amp... Lets hope its a combination of all new bike and English as not their first language.
 

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maybe lost in translation DDP.
And all the guys are not trained in Japan there, some work as after sale and some work as admin.
Or maybe they forget? but i do not think so.
 

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I do basic stuff like change the oil and filters and clean and lube chain. Anything more than that, it goes to the Garage.
People like to see the bike/car has been serviced by a professional here when they come to buy so it doesn't really pay to do work yourself unless you plan on keeping it for life
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I think future buyers wouldn't worry about maintanence if you show them the maintenance is always done. I look at used motorcycles and too often there is no oil or the oil is putrid.

If you keep it well maintained it will show.
 

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I do all my own maintenance except tire changes. Hate doing those, so I pay somebody else to do it.
If it's something that requires special tools, I will sometimes let a shop deal with it.
I don't want to buy expensive special tools I will only use once.
 

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Owned a Ninja 250r up until about a month ago and sold it for down payment for my CBR500R. I did almost all of the maintenance and service for the Ninja over the four years I owned it. Only two things I didn't do were replacing the tires (didn't want to invest in the tire irons and proper bedding tools) and replacing the brakes (same thing, only didn't invest in the equipment to bleed the brakes). Can't imagine the amount of money I've saved by doing the work. All lots of little stuff and not too difficult, but it adds up and labor is $$ taking it to a shop.

Lets see, maintenance I did in order of relative difficulty...

Clean/detail bike fairing and body
Clean air filter
Change lightbulbs
Lube/clean chain
Lube/clean throttle cable
Replace oil, also replaced spark plugs
Replace and bleed radiator fluid
Adjust chain clearance
Valve inspection/adjustment
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I do all my own maintenance except tire changes. Hate doing those, so I pay somebody else to do it.
If it's something that requires special tools, I will sometimes let a shop deal with it.
I don't want to buy expensive special tools I will only use once.
I agree.
I go by the same logic.
if a special tool is required and it is expensive and I won't use it often I usually pay someone.

And I also pay to get tires mounted. Because mounting your own tires is hella impossible.
 
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