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Hi everyone! I have a very irritating problem.
I wanted to change the coolant on my 2013 Honda CB500F so I followed my Haynes rapair manual and drained out the old coolant, then I put just destilled water in and started the bike and I let it idle a bit, then I shut it off and drained, then I did the same thing again and then the coolant that came out was pretty transparent so then it was time to fill the new coolant.

I began with filling the radiator and that went fine. Then, when I was going to fill the coolant reservoir, it comes out through a small hose at the bottom of the bike around the gearshift lever, at the same rate as I'm filling in the coolant. So it instantly comes out again outside of the bike. And I can see that the coolant reservoir remains empty and I just cannot seem to be able to fill the reservoir with the new coolant and it's very frustrating to put it midly.

Has anyone experienced this before or know what it can be? Please let me know. Thanks in advance!

/Sincerly, Simon
 

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I'm so not mechanical, but I have a service manual. It doesn't appear to be Haynes so I'm assuming we have different manuals.

Mine says you need to bleed air out of the system. That might depend on the exact process that you used to drain the fluid. To bleed the system it says:

1. Shift into neutral. Start the engine and let it idle for 2 - 3 minutes (this is obviously after already adding coolant to the radiator...).
2. Snap the throttle 3 - 4 times to bleed air from the system.
3. Stop the engine and add coolant up to the filler neck if necessary.
4. Install the radiator cap.

(I suspect you might need to repeat these steps to reach the desired level in the reserve tank, but the manual doesn't say that...)

Also, note, all of the coolant is added through the radiator cap. Not sure what you meant by filling the coolant reservoir, but I think you're supposed to do that from the radiator cap, and letting the bike run for a bit to pass the fluid through to the reserve tank.

Hopefully that helps..
 

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Pics would be very helpful, however, I suspect that your hose connecting the overflow tank to the radiator is disconnected. It should run from the bottom of the tank to the radiator near the cap. Or, your overflow tank is not empty. It looks empty because it is actually full to the brim and is overflowing! HTH
 

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I'm so not mechanical, but I have a service manual. It doesn't appear to be Haynes so I'm assuming we have different manuals.

Mine says you need to bleed air out of the system. That might depend on the exact process that you used to drain the fluid. To bleed the system it says:

1. Shift into neutral. Start the engine and let it idle for 2 - 3 minutes (this is obviously after already adding coolant to the radiator...).
2. Snap the throttle 3 - 4 times to bleed air from the system.
3. Stop the engine and add coolant up to the filler neck if necessary.
4. Install the radiator cap.

(I suspect you might need to repeat these steps to reach the desired level in the reserve tank, but the manual doesn't say that...)

Also, note, all of the coolant is added through the radiator cap. Not sure what you meant by filling the coolant reservoir, but I think you're supposed to do that from the radiator cap, and letting the bike run for a bit to pass the fluid through to the reserve tank.

Hopefully that helps..
Thank you very much for your detailed answer. Now I'm not so sure anymore if there really was air in the system that was the issue. But today I did ran it like that anyway in case there was any air in the system.

In the Haynes manual, they don't mention bleeding the cooling system of air when replacing the coolant at all. And in Haynes manual they state that you also "need" to add coolant to the reservoir, through the filler hole for the resorvair, as well as filling up the radiator. I attached a screenshot to this post of what I mean.

Pics would be very helpful, however, I suspect that your hose connecting the overflow tank to the radiator is disconnected. It should run from the bottom of the tank to the radiator near the cap.
The small overflow hose connected to the top of the radiator was connected during the whole time when I was going to fill the coolant.

Or, your overflow tank is not empty. It looks empty because it is actually full to the brim and is overflowing! HTH
Yep, I think this was the case, and I feel a bit silly now for that 🙂 the thing is that the reservoir really looked fully transparent, even though the coolant was very red. However, when using a flashlight directly on the coolant tank it had a bit of red hint on it. So I think the tank was full with coolant and that was the reason for it running out at that small bottom hose.

So I letted it be, filled up the radiator and took around a 3 miles test drive and the bike was running great and the overheating warning light never turned on or anything like that. So I think the coolant change was successful then.

Thanks for your reply.
 

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If your overflow tank is still completely full you should drain it to the full level line. You don't want to be overflowing coolant on a ride. That stuff is slippery!
 

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the thing is that the reservoir really looked fully transparent, even though the coolant was very red. However, when using a flashlight directly on the coolant tank it had a bit of red hint on it.
I added yellow-green antifreeze to my empty overflow tank today and the color is very visible through the tank walls. Bike is a 2014 CB500F.

Did you fill the overflow tank with plain water at some point? Any anti-freeze added to the tank after that would drain out the overflow tube, not replace the water in the tank.

If so, any antifreeze in the tank could be very diluted, thus having a faint color. Possibly it could freeze.
 

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I replaced the coolant of my 2014' CB500F not so long ago using the Honda Service Manual.
Here's my finding and tips :

The coolant reservoir located near the stand has two hoses connected :
– one at the bottom which is connect to the radiator
– another one at the top of the reservoir which is use to let coolant overflow as needed.

Normally no coolant should leak to the ground if the hoses are properly connected (and you doesn't overfill beyond the "full" line). I mean "some" coolant should rest in the reservoir! You should check that.

The coolant I used before was fluo yellow/orange, and I did find difficult to check the level. This time I used some "dark" OAT silicate free coolant (not specifically for motorcycle but well over specs).


When you do the coolant flush you should do :
— flush and clean the coolant reservoir first
(disconnect the thin rubber hose near the radiator cap - put it on a vessel near the ground : the coolant in the reservoir should flow - you can even rince with distilled water, the reservoir will end up EMPTY).

— carefully flush and rince the coolant in the radiator and motor. There is TWO bleeding screws : one near the oil filter, another one near the water pump. Like many I used distilled water to rince and let the motor run a few seconds to help the water rince.
It's like shampoo, you can rince and repeat if you want.

— refill : I guess there will be /some/ distilled water somewhere in the circuit even if you let the motorcycle drain overnight. To be overly careful (or wasteful if you want), you can rince with new coolant…
– Reconnect the hose.
– Fill at radiator cap hole to the top.
– Air bleeding : let the motor run a few minutes and do a few acceleration to help the air go to the top. Normally you have to let the motor run sufficiently so as the water pump starts…
If you haven't replaced the cap, you should see the coolant level sink a little. You can now add the coolant to the top of the radiator AND replace the cap. If you don't replace the cap now, the coolant level will overflow as soon as you stop the motor.

– if you replaced the cap correctly, when you stop the engine, some coolant should already flow in the reservoir through the hose. Complete now the level to the top of the reservoir.

REMARK :
If you filled the reservoir to the top, there is a strong possibility that some coolant leak to the ground very soon because of the way the coolant circuit work : when hot or cold the coolant circuit capacity is not the same. At times it will suck some coolant from the reservoir, at another time the coolant excess will be flushed in the reservoir. If the level is too high overflow will happen!

After a few days, a "correct" coolant level can be between the top and the bottom line!
 
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