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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I planned to keep my 2014 R model "till death do us part" (I'm 81 and have been riding for 60 years), but a new model came along and stole my heart. So after 80,000 miles on my cbr, I sold it and bought a Kawasaki z650rs:

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The bike is lighter than the cbr and has 20 more horsepower, but it's the looks that did it. The bike I had before the cbr was a 2006 Ninja 650 with essentially the same engine and I put 115,000 miles on it, so I know that engine pretty well. Still, it was not as trouble free as my cbr has been in it's 80,000 miles.

I'm going to miss that the Kawasaki doesn't have a forum like this. It's all Facebook nowadays, but I don't see how you can search for a subject on Facebook.

I've had some great discussions with members of this forum and got some really helpful advise on electrical issues. I hope I have been able to return some wisdom also.

By the way, I have some Givi hard bags and mounting hardware for my cbr that the new owner didn't want, so I am selling them for $150. Prefer not to ship, but will if you pay for it.

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Mc, Best of everything going forward. I always enjoyed your contributions to the mix.
Your new ride is a beauty & I understand the desire to change things up. I am tempted to get a Royal Enfield 650 as it would be more accommodating for my wife to double up on. Total sideways move however since the HP is the same as the 500 & it weighs a few kilos more. However I am a sucker for the pure retro look. The fact that you are a decade my senior gives me much hope going forward. I too have been riding since I was a little kid & have no plans to give it up. Take care & continue being young at heart.
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Your Delta table saw in the background pulls at my heartstrings as I had one as the basis of my wood shop operation for 40 years. Sold my stationary tools when I retired in 2019.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I BOUGHT that saw when I retired. I do wood working in our wet winters here in Washington.
I love that saw. Before I got it, I used an old DeWalt radial arm saw for everything. Now I only use the DeWalt for crosscuts.
 

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I love that you bought it when you retired! You are smart to only use the RA saw for X-cut only.
I hated to sell my Unisaw but I have no garage at home to store it. I did feel OK about selling it to a young guy who was starting a van conversion business. Reminded me of myself when I was 28.
 

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At 85, I enjoy my much modified '17 CB-500F as well as my '21 Royal Enfield Interceptor and '04 Moto Guzzi Breva 750, but I could sure go for that Kawasaki or the hotter Yamaha XSR-900. I doubt I'll make any moves in the direction of a new bike, but you never know!

Ralph
 

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Curious about your take on the RE as I am considering getting one. I test rode the GT & really liked the way it felt although the Interceptor is ergonomically better for me.
 

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Motohonace:

I would rate my Interceptor as delivered a 7-8 for overall enjoyment. I am very slight of build (135#) and the OEM suspension is almost immobile. For riders closer to 200# it's more compliant. I got a ($500) IKON shock with a 9.5 Newton spring and that is a good improvement. These are 20mm shorter (340mm eye to eye). I also popped for a $625 Russell Day Long saddle (totally custom on OEM pan) and for weight reduction I fitted a TEC "Stinger" 2 into 1 light stainless exhaust (Db killer left in). I also changed the fork internals to the YSS kit but that was not the improvement I'd hoped for.

At 3500 miles, the Interceptor now is about a 9 on a 1-10 scale. It is a good bit easier for me to manage with over a 30# weight reduction and close to an inch lower seating. Oil changes are very easy, but valve clearance checks and adjustments are more "challenging".

The Enfield 650s strike me as well engineered and manufactured. At their MSRP, they are a bargain. There have been some reports of electrical bothers, but I have yet to have any bothers at all. I was very impressed with the 36 month warranty and the same duration free roadside assistance program. I began riding in 1953 and really like the styling of the Enfield 650s. I like the styling. They do not look like insects with wheels.

Ralph
"You don't stop riding because you got old; you got old because you stopped riding".
 

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Congratulations on your new ride. That 650 twin is a nice engine. I had one in a Versys.
I also moved on but I still check back as I do miss my cb500F. I bought a Kawasaki z900. It feels exactly like a cb500F to ride only more powerful. It's supposed to look like a crouching tiger about to attack it’s prey but I just think it looks like a bug. It's looks have grown on me though and the performance with upgraded suspension is perfect for me. I love it.
Had the z900 RS Cafe been available at the time I would have bought it instead.

If you desire suspension work at a reasonable price there’s a guy in Indiana I use. Daugherty Motorsports.

Cheers, ride well. 🍻
 

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Motohonace:

I would rate my Interceptor as delivered a 7-8 for overall enjoyment. I am very slight of build (135#) and the OEM suspension is almost immobile. For riders closer to 200# it's more compliant. I got a ($500) IKON shock with a 9.5 Newton spring and that is a good improvement. These are 20mm shorter (340mm eye to eye). I also popped for a $625 Russell Day Long saddle (totally custom on OEM pan) and for weight reduction I fitted a TEC "Stinger" 2 into 1 light stainless exhaust (Db killer left in). I also changed the fork internals to the YSS kit but that was not the improvement I'd hoped for.

At 3500 miles, the Interceptor now is about a 9 on a 1-10 scale. It is a good bit easier for me to manage with over a 30# weight reduction and close to an inch lower seating. Oil changes are very easy, but valve clearance checks and adjustments are more "challenging".

The Enfield 650s strike me as well engineered and manufactured. At their MSRP, they are a bargain. There have been some reports of electrical bothers, but I have yet to have any bothers at all. I was very impressed with the 36 month warranty and the same duration free roadside assistance program. I began riding in 1953 and really like the styling of the Enfield 650s. I like the styling. They do not look like insects with wheels.

Ralph
"You don't stop riding because you got old; you got old because you stopped riding".
Thank you for the feed back on the RE. I began riding when my dad put me on the back of his Ariel Sq4 when I was 5 (1955) & then he bought me a Honda 50 in 1959. I got his Triumph Daytona 500 in ‘67. Of course growing up with those classic motos I love the look & feel of the RF 650s. Test rode the GT & really liked the whole package especially the fact that the engine was turning over about 1000 rpm less than the Honda at a similar speed. Seemed much calmer. I will probably pick one up next spring when we return home from our winter encampment. The electrical issue you mentioned is well documented. It boils down to too much lithium grease coating the relay contacts. An easy fix according to the various videos I have watched.
 
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