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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

As per title, is there any reason that I wouldn't want to completely back off the front/rear preload for a ~130lb rider on a 2018 CB500F? I have probably 10-15lbs worth of top box/rack also. It is almost exclusively used for <40mph commuting.

Thanks
 

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I have a 2017 CB-500F model with suspension that is nearly rigid for my 136#. Adjusting the spring pre-load will help minimally, but in the long run a custom rear shock and softer front springs may be the only way to go. Wilbers makes a nice shock for $600 and I'll do that mod (sprung to my weight and rather relaxed riding style. I'll remove an ounce of oil from the forks, maybe 2 oz, as that will increase the amount of compressible air space inside the forks and should allow a softer front end.

I wish there were a less expensive remedy for the shock absorber, but over time the money for a Wilbers will be well spent. Minimum pre-load will not do the job.
Ralph
 

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In answer to your original question, no, there’s no reason why you wouldn’t back it off completely given your light weight. I have mine backed right off, and I’m a good 20lbs heavier than you. I only ever add preload to the rear when my son rides pillion with me.
 

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Thanks both. I'll do as proposed and see how I get on, and enlist the help of a friend to also check the sag and make sure it's sensible. I won't be changing any suspension components any time soon, but would like to optimise what I have as best I can.
 

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But why not set it up correctly, rather than just backing everything off? Basically you need to adjust the preload so that when you are sat on the motorcycle (with all your safety gear on) the suspension compresses and you lose ~30% of your suspension travel. It's easier if you have a friend to help. First you need to look at your manual and find out how much suspension travel you have at the front and rear. Then take that measurement and divide it by 3, this gives you the front and rear sag numbers. This now tells you the amount of compression you want when you are sat on your motorcycle. Then lift the front wheel in the air and measure the distance from the top of the lower fork leg to the lower front yoke, now subtract the calculated sag number from that measurement, you now need to adjust the front preload until with you sat on the bike (with all your safety gear) the distance between the top of the lower fork leg to the lower front yoke with you sat on it meets your calculated value. You now have the correct front preload. You need to do something similar for the rear, measure the distance from the rear wheel axle to somewhere on the motorcycle (under the rear seat) with ther rear wheel of the ground, again subtract the rear calculated sag measurement from this value and then sit on the bike with all your gear and adjust the rear preload until you now have the correct distance between the rear wheel axle and your other measure point on the frame (under the seat). It takes a while to do, but costs nothing and now gives you the correct sag numbers rather than some arbitrary value.
 
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