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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

If you have experience(s) riding with crosswind(s), could you please describe the conditions as well as your experience(s)?

Could you describe to me where you felt turbulence?

In describing your experience(s), could you please include your motorcycles empty weight, speed, and the gear (not equipment) you were riding when you experienced the crosswind(s).

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Please see link

Does anybody have opinion about the video? Please be professional and kind.

Does anybody have similar experience?
 

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no, I find myt 2015 R extremly stable in any wind conditions compared to my road bike, you just lean in the wind and ride "tilted" if needed, the only way you can get a gust is when passing a truck / lorry, but I can usually react quite fast.

regarding turbulence, only when I am following a van / truck / lorry in a specific distance, i can feel a turbulence on my helmet if I am not laying on the tank behind the screen

the video it seems like it could have been avoided if they leaned forward and leaned into it more, however it seems like there was a case of target fixation ...
 

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I have ridden in up to 45 MPH sustained crosswinds with gusts to 65 MPH. The bike was very stable though I was leaned over a bit at times just to stay straight. The biggest issues aren't with stability at high speeds or in windy conditions, but rather power at the above 75 MPH when there are significant headwinds. The eco-minded A2 friendly cam drops off power right where you need it most.

BTW I ride with all the common safety gear and sometimes with a set of E22N GIVI hard bags attached, though I've only been in perhaps 20 to 30 MPH crosswinds with the panniers mounted.

Edit: regarding turbulence, I don't really experience any unless it's very windy and I pass a semi truck. I used to experience a bit of buffeting around 80+ MPH when tucked but a double bubble windscreen solved most of that.
 
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First of all, props to the rider for staying upright in the median (which can be soft), and then getting off the grass without accelerating too fast, thereby spinning their tires, slicking the grass and dumping the bike (grass is evil). Nice controlled return to the road!

I am a female rider, 5'6", not particularly strong. Have +25,000km on a 2013 CBR500RA that I just adore, mostly secondary highway kms, soft tailbags, no pillion or tank bag.

Aside from the usual womph from oncoming transport rigs, I have been blown around in my lane by crosswinds or coming out from overpasses. FWIW I learned to do four things:
  1. hug the bike -- curl down behind that useless windshield, like chest-to-tank, to reduce the "sail" effect of my torso and helmet for catching the wind;
  2. stick my knee out perpendicular INTO the prevailing wind (it functions a bit like a rudder), so here that would be the right knee;
  3. keep looking far ahead in MY lane, where I want to be; and
  4. get off the road and WAIT OUT bad weather whenever possible -- I'm not proud, Mother Nature can win all she wants to.
Hope that might help. Ride safe!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
@little500Honda

Thanks very much for your input into the thread. With following statement, I hope not to particularize you in any way -Your opinion as a female rider is respected and constructive from the majority males who ride CB500s.

In consideration of the HMI (human achievement interface) to protective gear and techniques for rescuing a balanced group of PEOPLE, I hope you continue to ride safely and enjoy learning with others. If I can suppose here, riding as a female can certainly be more individualistic than riding as a male e.g. levers, seat height, underwear, armor, etc. Asking for help can also be very gendered and confusing.

Through those challenges of self-learning "having" been opposed while continuing to remain resilient comes "considerability" e.g. being able to talk with riders of all skill levels and different members of [a] family; knowing more about yourself through challenges.

Thanks for helping to build a more learned social community on [a] platform such as the Cb500s.
God bless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
In advance, I apologize if i am adding too much i.e. growing up with a female mentor who wasn't a rider herself but a mother.

Be wary of social circles which celebrate women for riding, at times as a passenger, without protective gear i.e. false celebration of aesthetics - sexualization. Always remain efficous, vigilant and conscionable -especially in positions of subjugation. Being the only female in a group can be dangerous.

Be free. Be safe and enjoy.
 
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