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So I bought myself a nice 40 year old birthday present this summer, a VERY lightly used 2017 CBR500R for my first motorcycle. It looks brand new, had 1482 miles on it when I bought it from the first owner, it was apparently a 2017 model but they didn't take it out of the crate and assemble it until 2019.

The guy I bought it from told me the oil had just been changed when he took it out of winter storage this spring, so I have been riding it here and there this summer, about 450 miles so far. I took it for about a 20 minute ride to get everything warmed up and I wanted to have a decent before vs. after comparison.

Then I went ahead and changed the oil and oil filter for the first time today, man motorcycles are WAY easier to change oil on than cars, took maybe 15 minutes including letting it drain from the drain plug and the filter housing.

I have used Redline in most of my cars and race cars and had blackstone test them and have been happy with all of their stuff so that is what I will use in my bikes as well.

The oil came out looking perfectly fine, it felt similar to the redline (my first experience with motorsports oil so I actually got some and smeared it between my fingers and looked at it in a jar to see how different it is than car engine oil, it has a very different feel to it and smells quite a bit different I'm guessing all the friction modifiers/or no friction modifiers is most of the difference (I have a large supply of automotive Redline 10W30 on hand so I did a little amateur comparison of feel/look/smell out of pure curiosity)

Put an OEM filter on it, actually put a goldplug drain plug on it with a new washer (the OEM is 12mm, the gold plug I think is standard but just used a 17mm on it, torqued to 22 ft lbs), filled her up, wiped everything down and fired her up to let her run and see if anything leaked.

I was actually quite surprised by the difference in sound as it ran as I poured the used oil out of my catch can into the quart bottles; it idled way better (wasn't bad before but it was a tad tappet-y before) and then I let it warm up a bit more and then checked again for any leaks and then took it for a quick ride.

The engine ran a bit smoother and probably responded 5% better to the initial throttle input, it did feel a bit smoother, but the shifting was like night and day. It wasn't bad before but it took a little effort and would take a little more effort downshifting compared to upshifts, but with the redline it was like SILK both ways I was actually mashing it down since I had just ridden it and wasn't used to the change in effort it took. I was shocked at how much smoother and less effort it took to shift both ways.

I didn't empty the crankcase breather but I will before I store it for the winter, we still have another weekend or 3 of good Minnesota weather so I'm going to try to wait until the very last second before I store her for the winter.

Just wanted to let you all know if you feel like your shifter is just a tad clunkier than you think it should, or you just want to give the redline oil a try, I think it is awesome.
72556
 

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Nice work. Just to be clear: The oil with which you filled the sump carries a JASO MA or MA2 specification, right?
 
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OK, that's cool. I think I misunderstood your OP where you mentioned having a lot of Redline automotive oil around and were comparing it to the oil draining out of the sump.

Just FWIW (and I think you know this) the friction modifiers in auto oils will screw up your wet clutch. But you've used JASO oil so you'll be good to go.
 
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When I changed my oil from what the dealer use to a more expensive oil, the first thing I noticed was how slick the gear change was. It's amazing what you're favorite oil will do lol.
 

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OK, that's cool. I think I misunderstood your OP where you mentioned having a lot of Redline automotive oil around and were comparing it to the oil draining out of the sump.

Just FWIW (and I think you know this) the friction modifiers in auto oils will screw up your wet clutch. But you've used JASO oil so you'll be good to go.
Yeah I was commenting more on why they feel and smell quite different, nothing scientific other than smearing them between my fingers and smelling them, but even wiping some splash off the floor the motorcycle oil wipes up with a different feel to it than the automotive engine oil does. Just my first ever experience with motorcycle oils so it was interesting to notice the difference.
 

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My present bikes, the 2017 Honda CB-500F and the 2016 Suzuki DR-650, both bought as new but unsold leftovers, both are remarkably easy for oil changes. Compare these to the California Series Moto Guzzis from around 1980 to the mid 2000s, where to access the oil filter one had to remove about 16 Allen screws and pull the sump from the engine. The oil filter was inside the sump!. It was a nuisance, but at least you could remove and clean the sump thoroughly.
 
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Congrats and thanks for the info. I will be doing my first oil change once I hit the 600 miles.

also how do you like that Venon Stand?, I was looking for some to put my bike away for the winter but everyone recommends the pit bulls.
 

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Congrats and thanks for the info. I will be doing my first oil change once I hit the 600 miles.

also how do you like that Venon Stand?, I was looking for some to put my bike away for the winter but everyone recommends the pit bulls.
Its pretty good, I have nothing to compare it to but it lifts the bike up and seems pretty stable. I have debated using the stand vs using the kickstand and I'm going to use the kickstand this winter and just move it around a little, I only have the rear stand anyways so I figured it would be almost worse to get the cover off the bike, then get it off the stand, then move it a little, then put it back on the stand, then cover it a few times. The bike on the kickstand takes up less room than having it on two stands and trying to keep it in the corner of the garage.

i'm also getting new tires next year, so going to try this method and see if it keeps the flat spots away.
 

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Come on flat spots??
In my many years of storing my bike for 6 months over the winter in temps to -35°F I have never had flat spots.
And tires are made of rubber. Rubber is flexible.
And there is not enough downward force to make the tire get or keep any flat spot over the winter.
Its a myth. Or you have really bad tires!!
 
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