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Discussion Starter #1
No the ones you wear when riding your bike. :surprise:
So what crash lid do you have/wear.
I have Shark speed R full face, also a Shark flip front. Comfortable and both came with pinlock inserts to stop misting etc.
 

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HJC Rhapa 11 Pro. I'm a big HJC fan and have had 3 others before. This is the most comfortable, quietest, and best made helmet I've worn. I'm sure there are other helmets out there that are equal or superior to this HJC. But this is the most expensive helmet I've owned and was a bit of a splurge for me to spend anything more than the "bare bones but still good and safe" on myself. That's partly because I'm cheap, but mostly because at my age, I don't even buy green bananas anymore. They're just as apt to outlast me. :grin:
 

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AGV K1

It was in my price range for starting out.
In the future Ill get an arai or another AGV
 

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I "grew up" on Bell, so I have been faithful to them. However, my son handed down to me his helmet (as he quit riding). I forget the brand, but it feels very comfortable and I am sure passes all safety standards required.

IMO just about any well-known brand name has an adequate helmet.

I think the expensive ones just add some "bells & whistles" but not necessarily any more safety.
 
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I think the expensive ones just add some "bells & whistles" but not necessarily any more safety.
Absolutely, an example of this is shown in the SHARP ratings that the British government produces, where cheaper helmets have outscored much more expensive ones.

Part of the problem is that there is no objective definition of safe, so which helmet is the safest will depend on which tests you think most important.

The Snell Foundation's standards have been upheld as a marker of safety, particular in the U.S., but traditionally they have been incompatible with the U.N.'s ECE R22.05 standard, which is the legal requirement in almost all of Europe (including Russia) and accepted in many other countries around the world.

Snell required the ability to withstand a repeated impact, meaning a harder shell. The ECE favours a softer one so that it better dissipates the energy of an impact. So for any helmet it will be consider safe by one of those standards, and less safe by one of the others.

Any helmet that meets an appropriate legal standard is safe, after that the most important thing is that it fits properly and is in good condition.

When I was first started out riding I caught a patch of mud on a corner when I was wearing a cheap £35 helmet from discount supermarket chain Lidl that i had originally bought to have as a spare. I broke my elbow, but my head was fine. It was heavy and noisy, as reflected in the price, but it was safe.

I prefer system / flip helmets and used to wear a Caberg Duke which has a maximum five star SHARP ratings. But I did not think the ventilation was much good, and the field of view from the visor could have been better.

So when I replaced it I bought an HJC IS-MAX II, but it has just as many faults. Despite claiming to be especially designed for people who wear glasses, I have to take them off to put the helmet on, which was not the case with the Caberg, and it is longer so has to lay diagonally to fit in my top box.

The field of view is definitely much better but I am not sure the ventilation is any different. Both helmets had internal sun visors and came with a pinlock.

I am not sure what my next helmet will be, the other ones from recognized manufacturers in the same price range have lower SHARP ratings so it is likely to be one of those two again.

The HJC only has four stars from SHARP, but it has a 100% rate for the face guard remaining locked in their tests which is particularly reassuring. The Caberg was 87% so either of them is a compromise in one area.

https://sharp.dft.gov.uk/helmets/caberg-duke/
https://sharp.dft.gov.uk/helmets/hjc-is-max-2/

Not everyone likes the SHARP ratings, in my experience a lot of those are people who have expensive helmets and do not like them not being the highest rated! But they have limited value as many models never get tested, and there is a delay after release for ones that are. I do not know how they pick which ones to rate, they literally just go out and buy them off the shelf.

But it is only a rating system and not a legal requirement, so it is good that the government just does any extra testing at all. More information is better than none.
 

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Someone. Nice writeup. You just answered a puzzling question I had concerning the absence of a Snell rating in some of HJC's more expensive helmets, that currently sport the ECE R 22.05 certification. Thanks for clearing that up for me. :thumbsup
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Agree Someone, however you should always try before buy as everyones head is different. Hence I found the Shark best fit for me and have tried on many other makes but these ones fit me best, The flip front has R22.05 rating and the Speed R has ACU British Motorcycle Sport so can be used for racing. "Suits me Sir" as the saying goes.
:wink::grin:
 

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The problem with buying a helmet is that you don't really know what it's like until you ride with it on, and that's hard to do. Even if a dealer would let you take it out of the shop, the protective film over most visors would be impossible to see through. My last helmet was a Shoei Quest, and it was comfortable and was obvious high quality build, but it turned out to leak some air around my ears and had a high-pitched whistle in one ear. My current Nolan cost less and came with a sun visor and pinlock equipped shield. It also came with a quick latch system instead of "D" rings, which I like a lot. Most importantly, it is relatively quiet, but that is probably because it fits so tight around my jaw that it is hard to take off. That tightness might have caused me to not buy it if I had had a chance to try it on, but I bought it online from a private party, and lucked out that it turned out so well.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The problem with buying a helmet is that you don't really know what it's like until you ride with it on, and that's hard to do. Even if a dealer would let you take it out of the shop, the protective film over most visors would be impossible to see through. My last helmet was a Shoei Quest, and it was comfortable and was obvious high quality build, but it turned out to leak some air around my ears and had a high-pitched whistle in one ear. My current Nolan cost less and came with a sun visor and pinlock equipped shield. It also came with a quick latch system instead of "D" rings, which I like a lot. Most importantly, it is relatively quiet, but that is probably because it fits so tight around my jaw that it is hard to take off. That tightness might have caused me to not buy it if I had had a chance to try it on, but I bought it online from a private party, and lucked out that it turned out so well.
Agree you will only really find out when you give the bike some welly and keep within the speed limits. However unless you actually try it on first you will never know whether it fits comfortably. As I previously said most people have different shaped heads, what suit one doesn't necessary fit all.
 

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The problem is a new helmet will always be a bit too stiff to start with, so you are still left hoping that it will be just right when worn in.

But noise is not something I worry too much about unless it is extremely bad, as I always wear earplugs anyway.

I use the Senner ones which have an 18dB filter. Though the MotoPro ones marketed as for motorcycle use are the same as the WomenPro, WorkPro, PartyPro, and Music Pro Soft. The only difference is the filter colour; grey instead of red, yellow, clear, or blue respectively. Green is used for the Kids Pro, but the plugs are smaller for that one.

With them I am still able to listen to music when riding within the speed limits, and talk loudly over engine noise to other bikers at lights, or to people directing traffic.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
My TomTom sat nav links up to my iphone and Cardo QZ unit, speakers and mike. So can hear route from the sat nav without having to take eyes off the road, also listern to music and take telephone calls etc.
I don't have a problem with my Shark skid lids and found them very quiet at motorway speeds without any gismos on.
 

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in have a REEVU msx1. it has an internal mirror system and a rear screen so you can see directly behind you like a center rearview in your car; that functionality is VERY useful and i don't know if i can ride without it now. i put reflective tape stripes on the top, rear, and sides to make it very obvious at night (it practically lights up). additionally i've added the SENA 10r bluetooth and handlebar remote kit to it so i can control my bluetooth and phone without taking my hands off the grips.
 

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I've always been a Shoei guy. Shoei fit me perfectly, and that RF model line is very quiet (while still having excellent ventilation) with a high quality visor system. I loved my RF-1000 all the way up to the point where it was just too old to trust anymore. Too bad the Snell requirements changed to include withstanding the "double tap" - absurd, I think, as the odds your head will get hit in the same spot twice seem slim, and that requirement reportedly necessitated a slightly harder liner. Anyway, I really liked my RF-1200 until I crashed it pretty good - head was one of the first things to hit the ground and did so again several times as I rolled. I gotta say, it hurt a lot more than I expected (ended up with a minor concussion). Then I got a stellar deal on an X-12 (Shoei's racing line). Man, I love that helmet (the Kato design; love the manga graphics). Even better ventilation and aerodynamics. Sadly, I crashed that one, too. Barely contacted the ground, but it scratched through the paint, so it will no longer pass tech for track days.

So, I finally concluded I should find something a bit less costly and went in search of something inexpensive that was ECE rated but not necessarily Snell. To do that, I decided to look carefully through the SHARP ratings that Someone mentions above. Shark makes some nice helmets that test well, and I was leaning toward one of their less pricey models, but it wasn't yet tested. The Shark Race-R Pro is not cheap, but it has a 5-star SHARP rating, and man that Guintoli replica on sale was really calling my name!

However, I resisted temptation, and I instead settled on the MT Revenge helmet, which might be the least expensive 5-star SHARP-rated helmet out there. Top-level protection for about 100 bucks! I got get them shipped from England, and because it's a helmet, I didn't have to pay customs. I found these people a dream to work with - amazing customer service:
https://www.sportsbikeshop.co.uk/motorcycle_parts/content_cat/1294

Anyway, in terms of quality of the frills, you get what you pay for, but this MT Revenge lid is safe, and that's what matters to me. The visor system isn't nearly as nice as on a Shoei, but it works, and they do make pinlock versions. Fit is a little tight. I wear a Shoei medium, and that's snug; the MT medium is a little tighter fitting, but it's not uncomfortable- it just took a few wearings to break in. The small slots between padding where my glasses have to fit are a little bit high, but they're at least there; I recently tried on another helmet that lacked those slots, and it was a no-go. I have a medium that I now wear as my primary and a large that I tried on kept as a backup, as it still fits decently. I wore them all year this year, and I was pretty happy with their performance (ventilation, visor operation, etc.) I'm thinking about getting another one in case they stop making them.
 

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I have an MT Raptor flip-up. It’s been great for the money. I will probably replace it next year because it’s going to be six years old and, although it hasn’t had much use and appears to be 100% still, I start to get a bit twitchy past the five year mark.

MT do constantly refine and update their range though, so if you find one you like, it’s definitely worth putting a couple of spare visors onto the order as they can be tricky to find for the older models; particularly if you’re buying an outgoing model at a hefty discount.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I've always been a Shoei guy. Shoei fit me perfectly, and that RF model line is very quiet (while still having excellent ventilation) with a high quality visor system. I loved my RF-1000 all the way up to the point where it was just too old to trust anymore. Too bad the Snell requirements changed to include withstanding the "double tap" - absurd, I think, as the odds your head will get hit in the same spot twice seem slim, and that requirement reportedly necessitated a slightly harder liner. Anyway, I really liked my RF-1200 until I crashed it pretty good - head was one of the first things to hit the ground and did so again several times as I rolled. I gotta say, it hurt a lot more than I expected (ended up with a minor concussion). Then I got a stellar deal on an X-12 (Shoei's racing line). Man, I love that helmet (the Kato design; love the manga graphics). Even better ventilation and aerodynamics. Sadly, I crashed that one, too. Barely contacted the ground, but it scratched through the paint, so it will no longer pass tech for track days.

So, I finally concluded I should find something a bit less costly and went in search of something inexpensive that was ECE rated but not necessarily Snell. To do that, I decided to look carefully through the SHARP ratings that Someone mentions above. Shark makes some nice helmets that test well, and I was leaning toward one of their less pricey models, but it wasn't yet tested. The Shark Race-R Pro is not cheap, but it has a 5-star SHARP rating, and man that Guintoli replica on sale was really calling my name!

However, I resisted temptation, and I instead settled on the MT Revenge helmet, which might be the least expensive 5-star SHARP-rated helmet out there. Top-level protection for about 100 bucks! I got get them shipped from England, and because it's a helmet, I didn't have to pay customs. I found these people a dream to work with - amazing customer service:
https://www.sportsbikeshop.co.uk/motorcycle_parts/content_cat/1294

Anyway, in terms of quality of the frills, you get what you pay for, but this MT Revenge lid is safe, and that's what matters to me. The visor system isn't nearly as nice as on a Shoei, but it works, and they do make pinlock versions. Fit is a little tight. I wear a Shoei medium, and that's snug; the MT medium is a little tighter fitting, but it's not uncomfortable- it just took a few wearings to break in. The small slots between padding where my glasses have to fit are a little bit high, but they're at least there; I recently tried on another helmet that lacked those slots, and it was a no-go. I have a medium that I now wear as my primary and a large that I tried on kept as a backup, as it still fits decently. I wore them all year this year, and I was pretty happy with their performance (ventilation, visor operation, etc.) I'm thinking about getting another one in case they stop making them.
Natrix
I have found the Sportsbike online shop very good and they do match prices if you find cheaper in the UK. They also as well as their own site they sell through Amazon and Fleabay.

My Shark skid lids also has slots to take glasses and find them great. The tab to lift the pinlock visor is an absolute pain to use and you have to take gloves off to open.

When I replace my crash helmets I will stick with Shark.
 

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SportsBikeShop are my favourite bike shop too, I have only had good experiences with them. And, in the U.K., they offer totally free exchanges, so you can order helmets without paying extra shipping if one does not fit.

I have never visited them in person, but the past few months I have regularly passed their warehouse which is just outside of Boston (not that one, the one that is 10 miles from New York (not that one, the one that has a population of 150)). It is huge, probably the best place to go in the country if you want to try wearing different models.
 
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