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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I've got a bit of an issue, went to go start my 2013 CB500F w/ abs and the battery was dead. Grabbed my jump pack, jump the bike and let it run for 45min. Turned the bike off and let it sit for 10-15min. Went to restart the bike and it slow cranked, turned the key off and I noticed it tried to crank still. It cranked once every few seconds and then smoke started pouring out. Aw crap, start removing the seat so I can get to the battery and disconnect it. Removed the seat and battery was smoking, it's toast, my guess it couldn't handle the jump from how dead it was. Inspected wiring and didn't see anything damaged.

What would you inspect first?? I'm wondering if the ECU is done? I'm going to get a new battery but I don't want to just throw it in and risk it getting messed up because something is keeping the starter wanting to engage. Starter relay? ignition switch? If I had more a DVOM and a diagram I'd start testing wires but unfortunately I only have a test light lol

Any help would be greatly appreciated
 

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Hard to be know from your story what exactly happened.

If you are certain the starter actually cranked the engine without you pressing the Start button on the handlebar, then I suspect the starter relay has stuck closed. In that case it is important to replace the relay before installing a battery (or else the engine will immediately crank when you start to connect the wire to the battery terminal, making big sparks which could possibly damage the ECU).

To test the starter relay for this failure, first disconnect the battery! Then remove the two thick electrical wires that are bolted to the relay. See the service manual for removal instructions.
Measure with a meter: there should be no electrical connection between the two relay terminals where these wires connected. Otherwise relay has failed, replace it.

Let's say that anything over 100,000 ohms qualifies as no connection. Sweaty fingers touching the meter's metal probe tips can lower the measured value.

Reconnecting: use a small amount of force when firmly tightening the two bolts back into the starter relay. In electrical work they often go into brass threads, not steel.

Once you have a working starter relay installed:

Install the new battery (battery sits on its side, otherwise one gets its wire connections backwards and causes even more problems).

Turn the key ON and see if the dash displays the usual startup sequence. This is a self test of the ECU.

Good luck

PS: if you need to charge the battery, use a motorcycle charger. It's a tiny battery and can overheat with a powerful car charger if deeply discharged. a charger rated between 0.3 to 1.5 amp is good.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hard to be know from your story what exactly happened.

If you are certain the starter actually cranked the engine without you pressing the Start button on the handlebar, then I suspect the starter relay has stuck closed. In that case it is important to replace the relay before installing a battery (or else the engine will immediately crank when you start to connect the wire to the battery terminal, making big sparks which could possibly damage the ECU).

To test the starter relay for this failure, first disconnect the battery! Then remove the two thick electrical wires that are bolted to the relay. See the service manual for removal instructions.
Measure with a meter: there should be no electrical connection between the two relay terminals where these wires connected. Otherwise relay has failed, replace it.

Let's say that anything over 100,000 ohms qualifies as no connection. Sweaty fingers touching the meter's metal probe tips can lower the measured value.

Reconnecting: use a small amount of force when firmly tightening the two bolts back into the starter relay. In electrical work they often go into brass threads, not steel.

Once you have a working starter relay installed:

Install the new battery (battery sits on its side, otherwise one gets its wire connections backwards and causes even more problems).

Turn the key ON and see if the dash displays the usual startup sequence. This is a self test of the ECU.

Good luck

PS: if you need to charge the battery, use a motorcycle charger. It's a tiny battery and can overheat with a powerful car charger if deeply discharged. a charger rated between 0.3 to 1.5 amp is good.
I ended up borrowing a buddy's DVOM and tested the relay, it was bad. Either these things fail constantly or all 4 honda powersports dealers just don't stock them.....Ordered one online and should see it tomorrow. Also picked up a new battery. So hopefully that's all that got jacked up.
 

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Either these things fail constantly or all 4 honda powersports dealers just don't stock them
Actually they are very reliable, so not stocked locally.

I still can't figure how the initially dead battery and the starter relay failure are related. However the failure of the relay would cause the battery to totally overheat.

I suspect your bike will be good with the new parts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Actually they are very reliable, so not stocked locally.

I still can't figure how the initially dead battery and the starter relay failure are related. However the failure of the relay would cause the battery to totally overheat.

I suspect your bike will be good with the new parts.
Im gonna chock it up to shitty luck as this all happened about 15min before someone was coming to look at the bike to buy it :rolleyes:
 
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