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2013 CB500f
Pros and cons of upgrading tooth on front sprocket?



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I have had no cons.
I like the 16T sprocket I installed.
Installation is easy enough if you have a service manual.

Ride Safely
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Do you notice a difference with the acceleration? I want more top end. Well crushing at a higher speed at lower RPM


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FYI Changing to a 16T front sprocket is a fairly big No-No on a 112 link chain.
It will be running the same link - tooth combo too often which can lead to uneven wear.
I advise to consult gear commander to set proper gearing as per your needs and check for possible issues.
 

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Oyabun, I do not understand your statement.
Changing from a 15 tooth to a 16 tooth sprocket is a 6% difference.
The chain will not notice the change.
If you are saying that one needs to use odd-numbered tooth sprockets, I have never heard that .

I do not expect the top-end or the acceleration to change notably. I changed sprockets before many miles on my 500.

ride safely,
 

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It has nothing to do with the amount of gearing change. In fact I support gearing changes to suit one's driving style or conditions. Indeed it is about the even number of teeth on an even link number chain.
As 112 (the number of links on the standard 500 chain) is 7*16 it means that in case of using a 16T front sprocket all the links will get to the same tooth on the front sprocket every time. It is not something what would result in an early catastrophic issue but results in uneven wear - and a snapped chain is certainly not really funny and should be avoided if possible.
I'm on my mobile so cannot directly calculate it for you now, but I believe a 17 43 combination should result in a very similar final gearing that 16:41 but should result in significantly less same tooth - link contact effectively distributing wear along the chain and teeth.
 

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Thanks for the explanation. Guess I would have been better to have bought a smaller rear sprocket.


thanks,
ride safely
 

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I have been riding for over 50 years and I have never heard of that theory of sprocket choice. I think it is voodoo science. Think about how many times that front sprocket turns compared to turns on the rear. The fact that that same link shows up on the same tooth every once in awhile would have an insignificant effect.
 

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I have been riding for over 50 years and I have never heard of that theory of sprocket choice. I think it is voodoo science. Think about how many times that front sprocket turns compared to turns on the rear. The fact that that same link shows up on the same tooth every once in awhile would have an insignificant effect.
**** yeah. >:) Now we talking.
Probably you have haven't taken mechanical engineering classes like I did, or it was too long ago to remember. The principle is widespreadly used in mechanical engineering. There is a point why most motorcycles are installed with odd number of sprockets from the factory. I have quite a few printed engineering schoolbooks some of them written 40 years ago where this principle is clearly expressed when talking about chain drive systems.

Installing a 16 tooth front sprocket on a 112 link chain means the same link will contact the same tooth every single time!

Here is an easy explanation from gearing commander: GC: 'Same tooth - same link' situation

A direct reference from "Design of Machine Elements, 14.7 Design of Chain drive"
https://books.google.hu/books?id=M1y4_cfXy0AC&pg=PA553&lpg=PA553&dq=avoid+even+tooth+sprocket+chain

And an another one from the book "Principles of Machine Operation and Maintenance"
https://books.google.hu/books?id=zWbbAAAAQBAJ&pg=PA62&lpg=PA62&dq=chain+drive+same+tooth+same+link

Or an another citation from "Modern Diesel Technology: Heavy Equipment Systems"
https://books.google.hu/books?id=7pgbBQAAQBAJ&pg=PA411&lpg=PA411&dq=chain+drive+same+tooth+same+link

@ExTex, As I wrote earlier nothing to worry about on the short term - just pay attention, look for uneven wear of the chain or front sprocket every now and then, and change the whole drive all together when time comes.

@McRider, The fact that you have not heard about something does not mean that it does not exists. I'm pretty sure 50 or even 30 years ago you'd say that a network what contains pretty much all knowledge and information is bogus or woodoo science - even though Arpanet the very father of the Internet you use today was already invented, implemented and very well documented already in the sixties. Open your mind, and use the available resources before you judge others.

Peace and keep the shiny side up guys.
 

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Oyabun is correct, it's not voodoo, it's mathematics that is further explained on the gearing commander website mentioned.
With the stock combination, the chain has to do 615 revolutions before the same link-tooth comes around. Whereas a 16/41 combo only needs 41 revolutions to the same link-chain.
I learnt this after I had already changed the rear sprocket for a 38T, i haven't traveled enough distance yet to notice wear patterns. As far as the chance how, 3 down rear is similar to 1 up front, it's basically dropped the rpms by 7-8%; so at 100kph it's now sits ~4650 instead of around 5000. Hard to judge difference in acceleration as the butt dyno doesn't operate in fractions.
 

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With the stock combination, the chain has to do 615 revolutions before the same link-tooth comes around. Whereas a 16/41 combo only needs 41 revolutions to the same link-chain.
I also love GC .
Quick correction on what you saying: on a 16T:41T combination the front sprocket has the same tooth-same link every rotation, while it takes every 41 times at the rear - thus 41 times when it is on both the rear and front.
 

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one thing that you need to keep in mind too (apart from the mathematics aspect) ... i think i red somewhere here on the forum here, that anything bigger than 16 will require additional modifications to the front cover (because it just won't fit), so you will be probably better off changing the rear (and probably easier too)
 

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There was a good video of changing to a 17T drive sprocket.
Mainly having to grind a bigger arc on the chain "guard" that prevents the chain from coming off the sprocket.
The other problem is getting 17T sprocket to fit.

ride safely,
 

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I went up 1 on my countershaft sprocket shortly after buying my 2014 CB500F. I also used an aftermarket electronic speedometer corrector to keep my speedometer accurate. My MPG improved and I can cruise at high speeds at a more relaxed RPM. My 1st gear seems more usable than before...it doesn't seem to be too low any more. If the acceleration was hampered by the change, I'd have to have a stop watch to tell. I wouldn't recommend going any higher on the gearing (than 1 on the countershaft). You'd probably start actually feeling the tiny bit more distance between the gears as well as a decrease in sensed acceleration. I'm very pleased with the results and am not going to change it back. Chain wear seems the same as before.
 

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So 17F 43R set up with a stock chain is ideal setup to lower the RPMs on the highway?

Is there anything wrong with a 15F(Stock) & 39R sprocket setup?
No, nothing wrong with 15/39, but it starts to make 6th an overdrive gear.The stock bike should not be able to achieve redline in 6th gear. Making 6th even more of an overdrive starts to make 1st gear need a bit of slippage on uphill starts. I'm happy with either the stock 15/41 or the 15/39 gearing using the NC700 39-tooth sprocket.

I really want to just use the OEM 15-tooth drive sprocket to ensure a good fit on the counter shaft.
 

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Great posts on sprockets. I want to keep my 15T front, but go to a 38T or 39T rear on 2013 CB500X for more highway speed. Please advise if you know of good choice. I searched on revzilla but only found 41T to 45T for my bike.
 

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As JSonders indicated "the NC700 39-tooth sprocket." is what to buy (from Honda)
It fits the Honda 500 bikes.


Ride safely,
 

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I have added a link below. It's a simple "Sprocket Calculator" that lets you plug in the OEM numbers, then change sprockets' numbers to see the differences in speed and torque of the bike. It also shows how these changes effect the length of the chain per number links gained or lost.
https://sprocketcalculator.com/
 

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Another site with a lot of information about the effects of changing sprocket sizes is gearingcommander. That site has many bikes in a database with sprocket information.
 
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