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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
hi
I had my chain replaced at 8500 miles also needed a new chain at 15000 miles and now my chain is looking like I need to change it again in about 1500 more miles. My 2016 CBR500R is at 17300 miles right now. So 4 chains in the first 20k? Seems like too often. What is your experience? How do I get more out of my chain? This is my first motorcycle and I ride daily. What chain did you buy after the stock chain wore out? Also, what tools do you use to adjust the chain tension? And how often?
Thank you
 

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hi
I had my chain replaced at 8500 miles also needed a new chain at 15000 miles and now my chain is looking like I need to change it again in about 1500 more miles. My 2016 CBR500R is at 17300 miles right now. So 4 chains in the first 20k? Seems like too often. What is your experience? How do I get more out of my chain? This is my first motorcycle and I ride daily. What chain did you buy after the stock chain wore out? Also, what tools do you use to adjust the chain tension? And how often?
Thank you
The best chain I have come across is the DID XRING VX3. Get 18000 miles average on them. I have 60000 miles on my bike and have changed the sprockets once. I clean my chain and rear sprocket with paraffin in a spray bottle and a microfiber cloth every 600 miles, then give the chain a light wax spray coating. Good to periodically remove the front sprocket cover and clean inside there too.

Chain slack is important, see swing arm sticker for measurement. After fitting a new chain its a good idea to check the slack again after the first 600 miles.

Your wear is really rapid:
1.What chain are you fitting?
2.What makes you want to replace the chain? Frozen links?
3.Can you post pictures (straight on side views) of your sprockets? Worn sprockets eat chains.


See video below for chain slack adjustment, worth subscribing to Del Boy on YouTube, a fellow forum member pointed me to his channel.



Sent from my Redmi Note 8 using Tapatalk
 

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If your first chain went bad AND you know because it was stretched, then more than likely the sprockets were bad too. If you put on a new chain on worn sprockets, the sprockets will hasten the wear of a new chain.
 

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I ran the original chain on my bike until around 12k miles. I've got a DID VX3 on mine now (do pay the $10 for the rivet type master link, the clip type one fell out of mine) and I've put 4k miles on it, still looks brand new.

Are you doing chain lubrication/cleaning at the right intervals? They should be lasting you a lot longer than they are.
 

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Unfortunately, the rear chain on this model seems to be the one cheap part on an otherwise nicely turned-out bike. An early conversion to the best DID X-Ring chain made was my strategy. Fitment of a Scottoiler insured regular chain lubrication. I'm an easy rider and usually see 25,000 miles on a rear chain.

Ralph
 
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Unfortunately, the rear chain on this model seems to be the one cheap part on an otherwise nicely turned-out bike. An early conversion to the best DID X-Ring chain made was my strategy. Fitment of a Scottoiler insured regular chain lubrication. I'm an easy rider and usually see 25,000 miles on a rear chain.

Ralph
Ralph, What type connecting link do you use when installing a new chain? The clip type or riveted ? I've heard pros and cons for both.
 

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Ok so.. I was not doing any maintenance on my chain at all. Only when it went to the shop they would do the tightening and cleaning of the clain. .. so now I know it is important to clean and tighten. I was scared to try to do it myself as I did not want to make the wheel and axle crooked and have the clain not line up.

Last week the purchase some of the tools needed tighten the clain.
 

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This are pictures from today after I tighten and clean the chain for the second time last week. The 1st time I tighten the clain was a month ago. I believe I tighten the chain too much a month ago.
 

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Curious: Where are you sourcing your replacement chains? Have they all looked like this? I could be wrong but it appears the chain in the those pics does not have O-/X-rings. These types of chains will wear very quickly as the lube in the pins and rollers will escape and water and contaminants will ingress and cause wear and corrosion.

If you're selecting chains based on price alone, rethink your strategy. Get the best X-ring chain you can afford. Replace the sprockets with high-quality parts when you replace the chain. Keep the chain clean (don't be too aggressive with solvents or power-washers!) and give it a light lube spray on the rollers and to lube the O-rings every 500km (or more often if you ride in crappy conditions.)

I just replaced the OE chain on my Tuono for the first time at 27000kms. It looked good and clean but had tossed a few O-rings and a particularly tight-link formed. You should easily be getting that sort of life out of yours unless you're putting cheap, nasty parts on the bike or not maintaining it well.
 
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Also I purchased a $35 chain. Next time it will be the $90 DID XRING VX3. Maintain it is time. Somewhere it said 40 tension on the chain.
Now. Is there something I'm doing wrong up at the top? (Gas and clutch) when I was a kid on a 125 dirt bike I only used the clutch to get moving after that I would only let off the gas than shift up. But when I started with the CBR I always use the clutch. How do you use the clutch?
 

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This are pictures from today after I tighten and clean the chain for the second time last week. The 1st time I tighten the clain was a month ago. I believe I tighten the chain too much a month ago.
Tsquared. Just a glance at these photos. But I can't detect any slack in that chain at all. I'd be willing to bet it's too tight. IMO, it's much better for chain and sprockets wear and longevity to be on the loose side of manufacturer's recommended specs.
 

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I do not know if it was mentioned in the video, but the chain will tighten further once you tighten the axel.

When adjusting my chain I make it slightly looser than desired, tighten the axel just enough so the wheel does not budge by hand, and then check the tension again. That way it is a lot less work to loosen it up if you need to readjust it. Only when it is where I want it at that stage will I fully tighten the axel to the correct torque and fasten the lock nuts.

A very loose chain is dangerous, a too loose chain just means less smooth gear changes, a tight chain is dangerous, so as others have said, err on the side of a bit loose.

Also, there is nothing wrong with using a standard chain, but it will require a lot of effort to keep it constantly cleaned and lubed. So you either need to hire a pit crew or get an O- or X-ring chain in future.

Now that I am preparing to go outside, and get on my bike again, I have ordered a cheap semi-automatic chain oiler. I have not looked at my bike yet, but it has been sat outside for over four months so I am worried about rain having caused the chain to rust and seize. (It is covered, but that even vented ones seem to trap moisture, so it is a lose-lose situation.)

The electronic Scottoilers recommended for our bikes are quite expensive, and will need space to fit them. So I have ordered a Chinese knock-off of a Cobrra Nemo 2 as it is small and at only US$18.40 it is not much of a loss if it does not work.

Here is the original, but there are lots of equivalents on eBay and AliExpress: NEMO 2 - device for lubrication of motorbike and quad chains - Cobrra Nemo 2 chain oiler
 

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I do not know if it was mentioned in the video, but the chain will tighten further once you tighten the axel.

When adjusting my chain I make it slightly looser than desired, tighten the axel just enough so the wheel does not budge by hand, and then check the tension again. That way it is a lot less work to loosen it up if you need to readjust it. Only when it is where I want it at that stage will I fully tighten the axel to the correct torque and fasten the lock nuts.

A very loose chain is dangerous, a too loose chain just means less smooth gear changes, a tight chain is dangerous, so as others have said, err on the side of a bit loose.

Also, there is nothing wrong with using a standard chain, but it will require a lot of effort to keep it constantly cleaned and lubed. So you either need to hire a pit crew or get an O- or X-ring chain in future.

Now that I am preparing to go outside, and get on my bike again, I have ordered a cheap semi-automatic chain oiler. I have not looked at my bike yet, but it has been sat outside for over four months so I am worried about rain having caused the chain to rust and seize. (It is covered, but that even vented ones seem to trap moisture, so it is a lose-lose situation.)

The electronic Scottoilers recommended for our bikes are quite expensive, and will need space to fit them. So I have ordered a Chinese knock-off of a Cobrra Nemo 2 as it is small and at only US$18.40 it is not much of a loss if it does not work.

Here is the original, but there are lots of equivalents on eBay and AliExpress: NEMO 2 - device for lubrication of motorbike and quad chains - Cobrra Nemo 2 chain oiler
Good luck with the oiler i tried that same model but sold it, now im using a home made one .
 

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Also I purchased a $35 chain. Next time it will be the $90 DID XRING VX3. Maintain it is time. Somewhere it said 40 tension on the chain.
Now. Is there something I'm doing wrong up at the top? (Gas and clutch) when I was a kid on a 125 dirt bike I only used the clutch to get moving after that I would only let off the gas than shift up. But when I started with the CBR I always use the clutch. How do you use the clutch?
If you lube the chain regular ( every 150 to 200 miles well thats what i do) i use gear oil put on with a rag, recently fitted chain oiler though. You will not have to adjust the chain too often, and you will at least triple the mileage before chain and sprocket replacement. Dont spend money on chains. If you cannot do maintenance get a chain oiler fitted. Also with oil as lube the chain doesen't get gunked up too much. Just a word of warning dont overlube the chain because it ends up onto the side of the tyre. Hope this helps.
 

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Ralph, What type connecting link do you use when installing a new chain? The clip type or riveted ? I've heard pros and cons for both.
I have always favored clip-type links and that is what I've fitted. At one time (decades ago) there were no rivet links that I am aware of. Clips then always were very simple, just a long oval shape. 50-60 years later, the clip type links are pretty sophisticated and really fit snugly into the grooves cut into the end of the "pins". I use a chain press or a vise-grips to squeeze the outer plate fully onto the pins, checking that the grooves in the ends of the pins are unblocked. Then, closed end pointing in the direction of chain travel, I really carefully move the clip onto the pins. Then I check it again. Done.

The only time I had a clip fail was with the old style clip, in 1963 or so. I always carry a spare master link.
 
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I do not know if it was mentioned in the video, but the chain will tighten further once you tighten the axel.

When adjusting my chain I make it slightly looser than desired, tighten the axel just enough so the wheel does not budge by hand, and then check the tension again. That way it is a lot less work to loosen it up if you need to readjust it. Only when it is where I want it at that stage will I fully tighten the axel to the correct torque and fasten the lock nuts.

A very loose chain is dangerous, a too loose chain just means less smooth gear changes, a tight chain is dangerous, so as others have said, err on the side of a bit loose.

Also, there is nothing wrong with using a standard chain, but it will require a lot of effort to keep it constantly cleaned and lubed. So you either need to hire a pit crew or get an O- or X-ring chain in future.

Now that I am preparing to go outside, and get on my bike again, I have ordered a cheap semi-automatic chain oiler. I have not looked at my bike yet, but it has been sat outside for over four months so I am worried about rain having caused the chain to rust and seize. (It is covered, but that even vented ones seem to trap moisture, so it is a lose-lose situation.)

The electronic Scottoilers recommended for our bikes are quite expensive, and will need space to fit them. So I have ordered a Chinese knock-off of a Cobrra Nemo 2 as it is small and at only US$18.40 it is not much of a loss if it does not work.

Here is the original, but there are lots of equivalents on eBay and AliExpress: NEMO 2 - device for lubrication of motorbike and quad chains - Cobrra Nemo 2 chain oiler
I bought a standard Scottoiler (about $140) last year for my then new (leftover) 2017 F model and had a devil of a time finding the necessary vacuum source it requires to function--because there isn't a vacuum line on the 49 state USA bikes.. I recently had moved to Texas (where I bought the bike) from California and only California spec US models are mandated to have the fuel vapor charcoal canister and the vacuum line to draw fuel vapors into the canister. Oh, darn.

Thanks to a suggestion from Airhead83 of this forum, I sourced a micro vacuum pump on E-bay for $4 from China. I usually don't buy Chinese products but they were the only source for this tiny 12v pump. I wired the pump directly to the positive side of the battery, using a 10A fused line and then a marine-grade, waterproof toggle switch. On every longer ride (hour or more) I switch on the vacuum pump (which is holding up very well) and give the chain a dose of oil. I do not over-lube the chain, but make sure it always has some oil on it. The oil used by the Scottoilers is a light grade, probably about the same as ATF, which I use after the supply of Scott oil is gone. I typically get 25K miles to a chain and my chain of choice is the top of the line DID street bike o-ring chain. About $100 for 114 links, but very rarely requires adjusting. "Pay for the best and only cry once!"

Ralph
 
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I think the two things that are critical to any chain are 1) proper tension (too tight tends to stretch chain, wear sprockets prematurely, and even wear the shaft/wheel bearings too soon), and 2) keep the chain clean. On these o-ring chains, the o-rings keep dirt and grime from getting into the areas that cause premature wear of the chain - keep it clean keeps the dirt and grime off the chain. I use Motul street bike chain lube AND check out the item called a "Grease Ninja".


It is well worth the price of $15.00 ( I think that is what I paid a few years ago). It works perfectly and puts the lube rught where it needs to be without wasting it all over the place. I clean (with kerosene & a old used toothbrush) and lube with GreaseNinja and Motul street bike lube every 500 miles (approx).
 
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