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Discussion Starter #1
The last few days I've noticed a clunk sound at lower speeds when first taking off.
I can feel the clunk when spinning the rear wheel when it's off the ground.

I think I've narrowed it down to the master link.
What do you think, what's my course of action?
72191
72192
 

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You may start with a good cleaning and reoiling the chain. If you're convinced the chain has play between the links, I'm not sure there's a fix other than replacement. IMO, Once the links start binding, seldom do they get better.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I realize that the chain looks real bad in those pictures.
I lube it every 3 weeks or so and clean when it needs it.

When the bike is up on the rear stand I can see the chain jump up and fall back down when the master link is going around the counter sprocket.
You should be able to see it, there appears to be a missing oring or spacer on the inside of the front link
Sounds like a new chain is in my future?
 

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I realize that the chain looks real bad in those pictures.
I lube it every 3 weeks or so and clean when it needs it.

When the bike is up on the rear stand I can see the chain jump up and fall back down when the master link is going around the counter sprocket.
You should be able to see it, there appears to be a missing oring or spacer on the inside of the front link
Sounds like a new chain is in my future?
What you are describing is usually due to the sprockets being worn where the distance between the teeth (which are usually worn and bent forward) is different than the pitch of the chain (i.e. both chain and sprockets are worn).

If so, DO NOT put a new chain on old, even partly worn sprockets, as it will still not match and will prematurely wear a new chain. Don't to the opposite either: New sprockets with old chain.

Best advice, buy BOTH new sprockets and a new chain at one time.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'll inspect both sprockets when I get home and provide an update.
If I need all of it, so be it
 

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Discussion Starter #6
So the sprockets look to be in good condition as far as I can tell. The noise is the master link binding(maybe?) On the counter sprocket.
As soon as it gets onto it there's a snag/a little resistance to spinning that I can feel.
Ordered a new chain.
The counter sprocket is only about 2k miles old and the rear I have no idea on mileage.

Would you still suggest replacing all of them?
 

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While the Thailand-made CB-500s get deservedly high marks for quality control, their Thai-made chains have not been mentioned favorably. My one year old, 4300 mile 2017 CB-500F shows no wear at all on its chain or sprockets, possibly due to the constant lubrication from my Scottoiler, but I already have a New DID 520 DX3 gold chain ready to mount when I get the Ohlins shock, on its way to me now. If the OEM chain is a weak link (pun intended) I don't intend to let it damage the sprockets and multiply my expense when chain replacement time comes. In 67 years of weekly riding, I have never, not once, needed to replace a sprocket. No time to start now. My chains typically last 25,000 miles, or more.
When buying chains, etc, pay for the best and only cry once. This practice has served me well.
 

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So the sprockets look to be in good condition as far as I can tell. The noise is the master link binding(maybe?) On the counter sprocket.
As soon as it gets onto it there's a snag/a little resistance to spinning that I can feel.
Ordered a new chain.
The counter sprocket is only about 2k miles old and the rear I have no idea on mileage.

Would you still suggest replacing all of them?
What I would do is to purchase a known good quality chain and then wrap it around the sprocket to see how it mates. If sprocket is worn (i.e. pitch becoming off) then the chain will match for a couple of teeth or so, then get farther and farther off the mark. If this doesn't happen, and the chain matches pretty closely then do not purchase new sprockets. For me, when purchasing sprockets, do not purchase aluminum ones - this was a popular fad and the sprockets are generally cheaper (easier to machine at the factory) but aluminum will wear down much faster.

IMO, with these newer O-ring type chains will last and last IF the o-rings stay intact. It was the dirt & moisture getting into and under the rollers that used to cause the premature wear in the older style chains. The key is to keep the chains clean as opposed to the notion of "oiling" (which can only help), but the cleanliness is most important. That's why you hear people "oil" their chains using WD-40 (original formula) which ironically doesn't lubricate AT ALL. It is a solvent (mostly naptha) that is intended to wash out lubricants. What it DOES do very well, is to wash out dirt and useless caked on grease - thus keeping the chain clean.
 

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Interesting. It looks to me like the o-ring on the top ride side is gone causing the link to start separating apart judging by the distance that the plate has moved on the left side compared to the link plate just above it. If you don't have many miles on the chain/sprockets I would buy a new master link and replace the current one on there.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Interesting. It looks to me like the o-ring on the top ride side is gone causing the link to start separating apart judging by the distance that the plate has moved on the left side compared to the link plate just above it. If you don't have many miles on the chain/sprockets I would buy a new master link and replace the current one on there.
My initial thought was the same, but the price difference wasn't enough to change just the link.

I've got ~5k miles that I've put on it, unknown miles on the chain before that.
I've got a new chain showing up today, and I'll see how it rides and feels on the sprockets once on. Hoping for the best, so I can move onto my other maintenance projects, brakes, spark plugs and PC-V install
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The new chain went on much quicker than I expected.
I inspected the sprockets with the chain off and they showed very little signs of wear.
Chain rode smoothly on them, I didn't feel any sort of friction over normal.

Thanks for the help all
 

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Slevin, was there a need to cut the chain to length? How was the master link attached? Sorry, I've been hesitant to approach the idea of a chain replacement, and I'm not sure I care to purchase a 'chain tool kit' to remove and install riveted parts. Just interested if buying the proper chain makes the chore easier?
 

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. My one year old, 4300 mile 2017 CB-500F shows no wear at all on its chain or sprockets, possibly due to the constant lubrication from my Scottoiler,
Ralph, we've discussed the Scottoiler and it's install before, great idea. Curious.. what type and weight oil do you use in it to lubricate the chain?
 

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When I needed to replace the chain on my old 125 I was very hesitant about messing up by riveting one myself, but it was pretty simple.

The only delicate part is making sure you flare the rivet the correct amount, so it is neither too loose nor too tight. But you can be as cautious as you want by stopping to measure it with a calliper, then tightening further with the tool as necessary.

Although statistically a clip type master link does not seem any less secure that a rivet one. Looking online you get the usual stories of people who have used them all their life without a single problem, and others who say that they tried them and they failed every time they rode. They cannot be that bad, though, as they are still being used.

With my bike being parked outside in winter in the U.K. the biggest problem for my chain is rust. Which makes a clip sound appealing when mine next needs replacing, as the chain could be easily removed and given a good deep cleaning.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Slevin, was there a need to cut the chain to length? How was the master link attached? Sorry, I've been hesitant to approach the idea of a chain replacement, and I'm not sure I care to purchase a 'chain tool kit' to remove and install riveted parts. Just interested if buying the proper chain makes the chore easier?
Not for the one I ordered, it seems to be an OEM replacement and th correct length of 112 links
It's a clip type master link. Once you put the master link on the chain with the appropriate o rings, you have to compress the outer link(by hand I was able to easily) and slide the spring clip on with the solid end toward the direction of rotation.

Absolutely the proper chain makes it easier, I didn't want to have to buy more tools to take care of this and I didn't have to.

The process took maybe 30 minutes to remove things in the way, remove the old chain, clean and inspect the sprockets and put the new chain on. And this was the first time I've attempted anything like this, being my first motorcycle and all.
 

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Airhead: Initially, I used Scottoiler lube, a pint of which comes with each new Scottoiler kit. Afterwards, I use synthetic ATF, which is less pricey that Scott oil and does a very good job. The beauty of these lubricants is that they both are around SAE 10 or 15 and wipe off easily, unlike some chain lube which is a very sticky goo. A reservoir of oil lasts at least 800 miles and is easily refilled. Actual use of the oil is dependent on the flow setting the owner selects. For road use I like a setting on the low side, about a 3. Anyone fitting a Scottoiler should insure their bike has an easily-accessed vacuum source. When I learned that my CB-500 does not have a vacuum line (not being a California model) I took your advice and got a $4 electric mini- vacuum pump on e-bay and this is hooked up with a waterproof toggle switch so I can turn it on and off at will. It's been close to a year since I did this and the mini-pump arrangement works just great.

Regarding another post recommending a $40 Amazon chain, I suggest buyers consider the old adages, "You get what you pay for" and "Pay for the best and only cry once". Cheap chains are sprocket killers, adding eventually to the cost of chain replacement. A good chain for the CB-500 should cost no less than $80 USD. Much the same with cheap tires.

Ralph
 

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Great video, though when I last broke a chain, I just used a Dremel-like tool to cut the rivets off then pushed the link out.

Do you not have locking nuts on the adjuster though?
 

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Great video, though when I last broke a chain, I just used a Dremel-like tool to cut the rivets off then pushed the link out.

Do you not have locking nuts on the adjuster though?
Nope, it came like that from factory and so far no issues with the adjuster getting loose.
 
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