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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, first post here. Looking for some perspective from fellow riders. I've had my 2016 CBR500R (non-ABS) for about a year and put about 4,100 miles on it so far. Bought it new, but it was leftover so I got a pretty good deal I think ($5,200 before tax, plus I put on a Yoshi slip on).

Prior to that my only two wheeled experience was a 150cc scooter that I bought as a joke and ended up riding a couple hundred miles on. I've also taken the Total Control Beginner Riding Course, and spent a few miles on my friends 2019 Ninja 650 (which I felt was an awesome bike, and I had no problem with the additional power...though I thought my legs were a little bit cramped compared to the CBR500).

Anyway, I really, really enjoy the 500. It looks awesome. It handles fine for what I do with it (and I don't have much to compare it to). You guys know all of it's advantages. The only thing I cannot stand, is how it sounds. Which is like an ATV. I really, really enjoy the sound of an inline 4, and I have ZERO desire to own a super sport bike. It also bothers me that I impulse bought this bike, and didn't even realize I could've had ABS for a whopping $300.


So my question, first and foremost, is does anyone have any experience on a CBR650F or CBR650R, and do you think with my experience above it would be reasonable to think I could handle that bike?


And secondly, would you guys think it's crazy to keep the 500R if I picked up a 650R? I'm thinking I might get about $3,500 on a trade, which is a pretty steep hit to own a bike for a year (I probably have $6K in the 500R). I can't see it depreciating a ton from here, and it would be nice to have a backup bike (maybe wifey wants to learn to ride, something to ride when one bike is in the shop), or I've read that the 650R seat/pegs/bars are a bit more aggressive than the 16-18 500Rs, and maybe some days for more casual, longer distance rides, I just might want to enjoy the relaxed position of the 500R (it's pretty darn comfy if you ask me!). Is that crazy, keeping two bikes of that nature?


I've been wrestling with this for a couple of months now, and lurking on this forum, and finally decided to register and see if I could get some insight.

Oh, I'm in my late 30's by the way, if that matters for the first question.

Thanks in advance. And thanks for having me!
 

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If you can afford to keep to keep the "old" bike when you buy a newer-to-you bike, it makes the situation so much better.
Several times, I have retained the old one when buying the new one.

Usually I eventually sell the old bike, but not until I am positive that I want to get rid of it.
It certainly allows me time to make the decision as which to sell.
Also, I always have at least 2 bikes. Right now, a small sports bike and a larger standard bike. I ride them both almost every week.


So, yes, I vote to keep the 500 when you buy the 650.
 

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I went from a 2013 CBR500R to a 2015 VFR800 Deluxe. You might want to consider the VFR. There are some great deals out there for left over 2015's. I bought mine used wit 2000 miles on it and got a great deal. The deluxe has ABS, traction control, gear shift indicator and self cancelling turn signals. The sound is fantastic, even with the stock exhaust.

I loved my 500, but if I kept it, I don't think I would ride it anymore. I don't think I would like to go back to all that shifting.

There are some disadvantages. The clutch is harder to pull in, and the VFR is much heavier to push around. There is a more forward lean and the gas mileage is not as good.
 

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So, yes, I vote to keep the 500 when you buy the 650.
I vote for the same. You've got to have two bikes to have yourself covered. Also, the 500 is very cheap and easy to do maintenance on.

About the ABS, you are not missing a big thing. My 2018 CB500F has ABS, and in my opinion it is crap and fires too soon. I hope I didn't have ABS on my bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Thanks everyone, I appreciate the input!

Any thoughts on whether it’s too much bike for my experience level? I’m completely fine with the 500, and the Ninja 650 was fine as well (and a lot of fun!). I realize this is the point where a lot of riders get in trouble due to complacency or overconfidence. I’m trying to be diligent to not be “that guy.”
 

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I’m with all the others that say “if you can, keep it”. Got the urge to move on myself and was selling mine recently but everyone wants you to give it away and I just don’t have to sell it so am now back in the “keep mine also” camp and buy a second bike.

The 650 won’t be too much bike for you if you don’t let it. You control your right wrist. Just don’t ride above your abilities and you’ll be fine.
 

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Any thoughts on whether it’s too much bike for my experience level? I’m completely fine with the 500, and the Ninja 650 was fine as well (and a lot of fun!).
I don't know about you. But the CBR650R would be too much bike for me. That thing is a rocket! (and a thief magnet). If I was going to buy a second bike, I would aim for the supermotard or dual-sport style.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hi all, first post here. Looking for some perspective from fellow riders. I've had my 2016 CBR500R (non-ABS) for about a year and put about 4,100 miles on it so far. Bought it new, but it was leftover so I got a pretty good deal I think ($5,200 before tax, plus I put on a Yoshi slip on).

Prior to that my only two wheeled experience was a 150cc scooter that I bought as a joke and ended up riding a couple hundred miles on. I've also taken the Total Control Beginner Riding Course, and spent a few miles on my friends 2019 Ninja 650 (which I felt was an awesome bike, and I had no problem with the additional power...though I thought my legs were a little bit cramped compared to the CBR500).

Anyway, I really, really enjoy the 500. It looks awesome. It handles fine for what I do with it (and I don't have much to compare it to). You guys know all of it's advantages. The only thing I cannot stand, is how it sounds. Which is like an ATV. I really, really enjoy the sound of an inline 4, and I have ZERO desire to own a super sport bike. It also bothers me that I impulse bought this bike, and didn't even realize I could've had ABS for a whopping $300.


So my question, first and foremost, is does anyone have any experience on a CBR650F or CBR650R, and do you think with my experience above it would be reasonable to think I could handle that bike?


And secondly, would you guys think it's crazy to keep the 500R if I picked up a 650R? I'm thinking I might get about $3,500 on a trade, which is a pretty steep hit to own a bike for a year (I probably have $6K in the 500R). I can't see it depreciating a ton from here, and it would be nice to have a backup bike (maybe wifey wants to learn to ride, something to ride when one bike is in the shop), or I've read that the 650R seat/pegs/bars are a bit more aggressive than the 16-18 500Rs, and maybe some days for more casual, longer distance rides, I just might want to enjoy the relaxed position of the 500R (it's pretty darn comfy if you ask me!). Is that crazy, keeping two bikes of that nature?


I've been wrestling with this for a couple of months now, and lurking on this forum, and finally decided to register and see if I could get some insight.

Oh, I'm in my late 30's by the way, if that matters for the first question.

Thanks in advance. And thanks for having me!
Any thoughts on whether it’s too much bike for my experience level? I’m completely fine with the 500, and the Ninja 650 was fine as well (and a lot of fun!).
I don't know about you. But the CBR650R would be too much bike for me. That thing is a rocket! (and a thief magnet). If I was going to buy a second bike, I would aim for the supermotard or dual-sport style.
No kidding? I've never ridden anything with an inline 4 before. I did ride the new ninja 650 and really, really enjoyed it. Ive ki d of been thinking the 650r is above the ninja 650 by about the same amount as the ninja 650 is above the 500r.

Slightly less torque than the ninja and a tad heavier, so figured as long as I don't get stupid in the upper rev range, I would be ok.

Thinking the slipper clutch, abs, and traction control are nice safety options to have too, but maybe I'm giving them too much credit.

Didn't consider the theft factor...but also don't really care. That will be Geico's problem. ?

(Really though, I live in a rural area with low crime, and would keep the bike in a garage).
 

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I am going to be the wet blanket of rational thought here. You have owned the 500 for a year & enjoy it. It is your first “real bike”. Keep it & ride it for another year or two at least. You may not like the way it sounds, but so what. How a bike sounds would be the last thing I would concern myself with. The 500 is nimble, plenty quick enough if you push it & super economical to run. You are going to leave money on table using it as a trade in. I assume it is paid for. So, log more miles on the 500 & at some point in the future you will not wonder if something bigger is too much bike. FYI, I am in my late 60s, having survived my youth on motorcycles. I have owned in-line 750 4s, single, twin & triple 500s & a bunch of smaller bikes in my 60 years of riding. The CB500f I have had since 2016 & still love it. Sure a KTM 1290 Super Duke would be nice, but for the real world actual riding environment I am happy with the 500. Going the other direction, my current other ride is a Yamaha TW 200 dual sport which is a total blast too.
PS, I am old school. A slipper clutch only is needed if you down shift a bunch of gears & lock the rear wheel. Something experience would not let you do in the first place. ABS, OK I understand, but not my thing (sorry ExTex). Traction control is called knowing your limits & keeping the rubber on the ground.
 

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I agree with wet blanket! Spend some time on the 500, improve your skills, build experience, etc. Get your money's worth and then move on to whatever is next.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I am going to be the wet blanket of rational thought here. You have owned the 500 for a year & enjoy it. It is your first “real bike”. Keep it & ride it for another year or two at least. You may not like the way it sounds, but so what. How a bike sounds would be the last thing I would concern myself with. The 500 is nimble, plenty quick enough if you push it & super economical to run. You are going to leave money on table using it as a trade in. I assume it is paid for. So, log more miles on the 500 & at some point in the future you will not wonder if something bigger is too much bike. FYI, I am in my late 60s, having survived my youth on motorcycles. I have owned in-line 750 4s, single, twin & triple 500s & a bunch of smaller bikes in my 60 years of riding. The CB500f I have had since 2016 & still love it. Sure a KTM 1290 Super Duke would be nice, but for the real world actual riding environment I am happy with the 500. Going the other direction, my current other ride is a Yamaha TW 200 dual sport which is a total blast too.
PS, I am old school. A slipper clutch only is needed if you down shift a bunch of gears & lock the rear wheel. Something experience would not let you do in the first place. ABS, OK I understand, but not my thing (sorry ExTex). Traction control is called knowing your limits & keeping the rubber on the ground.
Good points. On the safety stuff, I realize what they are all for and I’ve never had any issues with downshifting too early (or too many gears). Never really broke traction braking. And I’m not sure the 500 has enough power to need traction control (I suppose on a slippery road).

But I’ve been trying to read as much as I can for the past year, and all of the magazines and “pros” make it seem downright irresponsible to not have those things in this day and age.

Either way, I appreciate all of the perspectives and input. Gives me a lot to think about.
 

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Sounds like you just need an aftermarket exhaust and/or ear plugs.

I haven't ridden the 650 but it might be a step down in versatility. I have had bikes where my primary struggle has been to keep under the speed limit. The 500 is great for city commuting with 40-50kmph zones.
 

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I was actually going to the dealer to buy a 650r but ended up getting the 500r after a test ride on both. the 500 was more comfortable (footpegs further forward and lower), had adequate power, and weighed less (also cost less). I was coming from a Ninja 650r.
 

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I am going to be the wet blanket of rational thought here. You have owned the 500 for a year & enjoy it. It is your first “real bike”. Keep it & ride it for another year or two at least. You may not like the way it sounds, but so what. How a bike sounds would be the last thing I would concern myself with. The 500 is nimble, plenty quick enough if you push it & super economical to run. You are going to leave money on table using it as a trade in. I assume it is paid for. So, log more miles on the 500 & at some point in the future you will not wonder if something bigger is too much bike. FYI, I am in my late 60s, having survived my youth on motorcycles. I have owned in-line 750 4s, single, twin & triple 500s & a bunch of smaller bikes in my 60 years of riding. The CB500f I have had since 2016 & still love it. Sure a KTM 1290 Super Duke would be nice, but for the real world actual riding environment I am happy with the 500. Going the other direction, my current other ride is a Yamaha TW 200 dual sport which is a total blast too.
PS, I am old school. A slipper clutch only is needed if you down shift a bunch of gears & lock the rear wheel. Something experience would not let you do in the first place. ABS, OK I understand, but not my thing (sorry ExTex). Traction control is called knowing your limits & keeping the rubber on the ground.







Very good post,10/10.


Plasma1
 

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I won't be popular for saying this but I say follow your heart. Motorcycling is a passion, not a job. If you are irked by a characteristic of the bike you have now (e.g. the sound) and can wing the insurance for a CBR650R and are comfortable on it, I say go for it.

Of course only you can judge whether you'd get into trouble on one. I4 engines tend to have relatively soft bottom end power delivery so you should be easily able to "work" up to its power peak up at 11,000rpm without much fear. The 2019s make about 80hp at the wheel, plenty for the street but without pulling your arms out of their sockets or risking a throttle-on loop. And the 650R is a **** fine looking bike.

I was in the same boat as you back in 2014. I really loved my 500 but the sound just didn't resonate (pun not intended) with me. I ended up trading it toward a Yamaha FZ8S and enjoyed that immensely.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Just following up on this thread. I couldn't stop drooling over the 650R, and my local dealer called me last week (he knew I was kicking around this idea) and told me another local dealer ordered a 650R for a prospective customer, whom then bailed on it, and he could get me a decent deal on it if I wanted it.

So of course, I pulled the trigger.

Picked the bike up Friday, ended up not trading the 500.

First impressions on the 650 so far are...totally awesome! I like the new dash (which I think the 2019 500R's also have?). Power, which I didn't even remotely tap into (had 4 miles on the odometer), is unreal. Love the sound as much as I thought I would. The riding position is slightly more aggressive than the 500R (well, the 16-18 models anyway, I think they changed the 19 a little bit). Not uncomfortable by any means, but if I were going to take a day trip, I'd probably opt to go on the 500 instead.

Bike looks beautiful, though I think I like the back half of the 500 more than the 650.

So all in all, now I have two comfortable, reliable, and fun bikes, and couldn't be happier with both purchases.
 

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Just following up on this thread. I couldn't stop drooling over the 650R, and my local dealer called me last week (he knew I was kicking around this idea) and told me another local dealer ordered a 650R for a prospective customer, whom then bailed on it, and he could get me a decent deal on it if I wanted it.

So of course, I pulled the trigger.

Picked the bike up Friday, ended up not trading the 500.

First impressions on the 650 so far are...totally awesome! I like the new dash (which I think the 2019 500R's also have?). Power, which I didn't even remotely tap into (had 4 miles on the odometer), is unreal. Love the sound as much as I thought I would. The riding position is slightly more aggressive than the 500R (well, the 16-18 models anyway, I think they changed the 19 a little bit). Not uncomfortable by any means, but if I were going to take a day trip, I'd probably opt to go on the 500 instead.

Bike looks beautiful, though I think I like the back half of the 500 more than the 650.

So all in all, now I have two comfortable, reliable, and fun bikes, and couldn't be happier with both purchases.
Glad to hear you like the 650, more than likely going to be my next bike when i can get the unrestricted version.

and when i have some more money for it lol
 

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Wrapfee, Congrats on starting your own moto-collection. Lots of us have more than one bike. I hope you continue to enjoy them both & any others that may find their way into your stable. Be safe, have fun.
 

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I have to say I like the advise to keep the current bike and get more experience, I remember when I was 17 I went from a 250 to a 750 and had no real issues, you just have to watch what you are doing at the start, I would think going from a 500 to a 650 (even if its a twin to an inline 4 would not be an issue), just take your time to get used to the quicker throttle response and the better handling, but I would suggest getting more use out of your current bike before upgrading to something else, its only been a year!! :)



Gary
 
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