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Discussion Starter #1
Hi. Just registered with this forum because im looking to buy a 2017 cbr500r with 7k miles and would like to know if there any specific things to ask about or look at. They want around 4k and Im new to street bikes but have worked on dirtbikes in the past. Any tips are appreciated.
 

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Items to check are similar to dirt bikes.

These bikes have a modern engine computer and catalytic convertor. Providing the battery is charged, they start the instant the start button is pressed.
With the engine now running, the lights that should show on the dash (for US models) is the green neutral light and the ABS light (at least for 2015 ABS models). The ABS light should go off when the bike is ridden.

Check chain and rear sprocket teeth for wear.

At 7K miles the rear tire is probably almost worn out, with a big flat area where the crown of the tire tread once was.

Owners sometimes put a louder muffler on the bike. Easy to do.
But a few replace the exhaust pipe and catalytic convertor with a straight through set of pipes. This requires reprogramming the engine ECU or adding an outboard tuner ECU to run well. I would stay away from a bike with that modification - the dealer can't help you if it doesn't run right.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I will keep those things in mind. Thanks!. The ABS is new to me but I think I'd like to have it. I'm also wondering about the suspension. I did alot of changes on suspension with my dirtbikes with sag and proper springs but don't really want to have bother with much of that anymore. My weight of 195 is hopefully in the ballpark of setup.
 

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I modified my front and rear suspension, but I am fussy about suspension in cars and bikes. These bikes and their competitors come with somewhat primative suspension damping based on a damper rod. Damper rod gives poor/loose damping control on smooth roads and harsh ride over sudden jolts.

I was surprised by how good a job Honda did in making the compromises of this type of suspension. See how you like it. Whether to change things really depends on how sensitive you are to having a well controlled but supple suspension.

At 195 lbs, I believe you are at the upper end of the fork spring rate. Try setting the fork preload towards max. It's easy to change to stiffer front springs but spendy to upgrade the fork damping to cartridge emulators (parts plus much labor rebuilding the forks).

The rear shock is not rebuildable, it's spring is not removable. Try going up a step or two from the user manual recommended preload.
There are threads on this forum of replacing the rear shock + spring with other parts.
 

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Welcome to the forum, lots of good advice on here. You have picked a good bike in cb500r. I am 165lbs and found my F too stiff. So a bit of adjustment should sort you out.
 

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To Rollingtach - This is also my first bike with ABS. I was in a rapidly developing situation on an interstate and had to brake very hard. Did so, everything safe. BUT, I realized later that I had done my braking with the mental limits I am used to. I did not let the bike use it's ABS but braked hard as I always did, avoiding anticipated tire lockup. I'm thinking that I should have, could have, over-braked and let the ABS give me maximum braking power/shorter stopping distance.
 

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I suppose modern ABS systems might be better, but it always used to be the case that braking properly can be done over a shorter distance than using ABS. It is not meant to be a replacement for braking, but a safety system to stop the wheels locking up ob those occasions when things go wrong.

To quote my owner's manual: "ABS does not reduce braking distance. In certain circumstances ABS may result in a longer stopping distance."

Personally I would rather brake normally with the comfort of having ABS as a backup, than just locking the wheels and letting ABS take care of stopping the bike without nothing extra in reserve. Or worse, deliberately locking the wheels up then ABS failing.
 

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I suppose modern ABS systems might be better, but it always used to be the case that braking properly can be done over a shorter distance than using ABS. It is not meant to be a replacement for braking, but a safety system to stop the wheels locking up ob those occasions when things go wrong.
I have mixed feelings regarding motorcycle ABS systems. I'm old and set in my ways. But I'm not so out of touch to believe all technology is worthless. Having said that, I'm not convinced the extra problems and maintenance ABS requires on today's motorcycles are worth the extra help they provide. There seems to be several layers of potential problem areas and redundancy in the basic design. Maybe that's necessary for the safety of the system. I just don't care to depend on a system I don't fully trust.
 

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I have mixed feelings regarding motorcycle ABS systems. I'm old and set in my ways. But I'm not so out of touch to believe all technology is worthless. Having said that, I'm not convinced the extra problems and maintenance ABS requires on today's motorcycles are worth the extra help they provide. There seems to be several layers of potential problem areas and redundancy in the basic design. Maybe that's necessary for the safety of the system. I just don't care to depend on a system I don't fully trust.
Albeit I cannot relate to your reluctance towards the ABS, I understand that if you don't trust a system, you might not be comfortable depending on it.
I can only say, that I totally trust the ABS on my bikes (I only have Honda bikes) and let me explain you why.
First it is totally failsafe. I mean if it malfunctions, it doesn't interfere at all. Bike will behave like an ordinary bike with no ABS installed.
Second, while in theory and in certain circumstances in perfect conditions, on closed circuits very experienced racers could have marginally shorter braking distances without ABS - during normal riding conditions, normal riders cannot replicate that. Plus it works every time in every condition, even if the rider has just a slight loss of control, or some unpredicted issue happens.
I consider myself an experienced rider. I'm an all year rider getting on one of my bikes in shine or snow. I also have over twohundred thousand street miles under my belt, several seasons of track riding, and many safety and technical courses done. Still it happens sometimes that I get on the bike in less than ideal situations let them be either external like weather, road conditions, etc, or internal reasons like being fatigued, distracted, or exhausted. Still the ABS does it's job all the time without failing. Ridind as much as I do, it happens at least 2-3 times every year when it saves my ass.
Just my two cents.
 

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Well said. That helps. My reluctance is more from my lack of knowing how the system operates, than the system's dependability. So, thanks for taking the time to explain and give your riding experiences. (y)
 
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