Honda CBR 500 Riders Forum banner

21 - 27 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Very inspirational hearing about all of your many years of riding. I hope to also make it that far.

Sent from my Redmi Note 8 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
461 Posts
Besides the high mileage Hondas it is encouraging to see a bunch of us high milage fellows. My father rode his entire life until he passed, not from a motorcycle accident. He was doing coast to coast & international tours until the end. I wish the same for all of us. I blame him for my moto addiction. He put me on the Pillion of his Ariel Square Four when I was 5, bought me a Honda trail 50 when I turned 9 & the rest is history. I have always felt that two wheels trumps four whenever possible. Have more fun getting there & back!
9B7D98BB-1024-467C-B883-D85DCB819CC9.png
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
542 Posts
Discussion Starter #23
I think a lot of us old timers know that 47 horsepower is perfectly adequate for solo riding. After all, the 68 Triumph Bonneville that I restored and sold a few years ago had the same power and it was considered to be a very fast bike back in it's day. As I get older, light weight and a low seat height become more important than horsepower.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
270 Posts
As I get older, light weight and a low seat height become more important than horsepower.
+1 on that thought. I've aged... maybe not so gracefully, maybe not wiser. But I've finally figured out.. I'm not handsome, not 10ft tall, and not bulletproof. And lighter, more technically advanced, smaller cc modern bikes are still more capable machines than I am a rider, even after 50 years of trying. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
142 Posts
I found the same with seat and suspension. Had the seat fitted with memory foam and a new shock its real good now. I find the seat slopes to the front too much. How did you modify your seat to lift at the front.
Being inordinately lazy, I didn't modify the seat itself. I added two firm rubber blocks, each 3/4" thick, to the frame where the seat contacts the frame. Then, when I fit the seat, I do not put the tab on the front bottom of the seat under it's usual mounting point on the frame; I put the tab ABOVE the bracket but below the rear of the tank. This tab or tongue does not bear any weight; it is only an anchoring point for the front of the seat. Raising the front of the seat this way cost me nothing and with the new suspension the sag is increased to suit my light weight (133#) and this positions the top of the seat parallel to the ground which definitely enhances rider comfort. I'm still fiddling with preload and rebound damping to get just the shock performance I require. Thread about this when I'm done. Should be a bout 2 weeks.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ADIOS600

·
Registered
Joined
·
222 Posts
Thanks for that. I'm dialing my new shock in, I suffer with my back. Roads here are crap. Spring preload two turns softer I have two more turns soft to spare. Bump and rebound two full turns towards soft. Front preload backed off to maximum soft. It's worked for me, a little wollowy if your pushing hard when cranked over but all in all a major improvement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
142 Posts
Besides the high mileage Hondas it is encouraging to see a bunch of us high milage fellows. My father rode his entire life until he passed, not from a motorcycle accident. He was doing coast to coast & international tours until the end. I wish the same for all of us. I blame him for my moto addiction. He put me on the Pillion of his Ariel Square Four when I was 5, bought me a Honda trail 50 when I turned 9 & the rest is history. I have always felt that two wheels trumps four whenever possible. Have more fun getting there & back!
View attachment 72395
Ah, the Ariel Square Four.Mk.II I000 cc, with twin crankshafts.. It beings back old memories of when I worked in Mt. Vernon, NY for a BSA/Ariel/Velocette dealership as a mechanic in the early 1960s. This was an incredibly complex "dog's breakfast" of parts but I must admit it produced an incredibly pleasant bike to ride. It was unusually smooth and with the single SU (automobile) carburetor it would rum happily in 4th gear at 1000 rpm and on opening the throttle the rider was treated to very nice, un-hesitant acceleration. The Anstey Link rear suspension was a bit over my skill level, but it seemed to work well enough and I never was required to service one. The beautiful, polished aluminum engine/gearbox castings were and are very attractive. Note that this bike full of fluids weighed only about 450#. Very light for all its parts.
 
  • Like
Reactions: motohonace
21 - 27 of 27 Posts
Top