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Discussion Starter #1
This is the second 2014 I've owned. I put about 15,000 miles on the first one and then gave it to my daughter. The current one I bought used with 3,000 miles and I just turned 50,000. I just finished a bunch of maintenance including:
valve adjustment check (see valve adjustment thread for results)
oil and filter change
coolant change
fork oil change
clean and re-oil K&N air filter
checked front sprocket wear (it was replaced at 30+K miles).

On this bike I have gone through six rear tires and four fronts. A couple of times the rear tire was not quite down to the wear bars but I was starting on a long trip and needed a tire that would make it. I also had one rear puncture that was not repairable.

I have replace both front and rear brake pads and the spark plugs once at a 30,000 mile valve check. I think the plugs could have easily gone to 50K.

I am on the third drive chain, which is surprising. The first one lasted 16,000 miles and so did the second one. The third one is an EK chain and is wearing much better.

The first 500 that I gave to my daughter had a battery failure with a shorted cell. It also had some minor shifting problems (missed shifts periodically). My daughter says this still happens but is rare. This bike has had no mechanical or electrical problems at all.

I really love this bike and expect to get 100,000 miles out of it. The previous bike was a Kawasaki Ninja 650 that I put 115,000 miles on, but it did not have the quality or fit and finish of this Honda.
 

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welcome to the mad house, sounds like you are putting some serious mileage on that bike!! If you haven't done it yet, at this sort of mileage I would also consider re-greasing the steering head bearings and the swing arm bearings and linkages, 50,000 miles is a lot of miles!! The wheel bearings would probably like you more as well if they got some new grease!!


Gary
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, you reminded me that I should check those items. Since I have a center stand I can check the swingarm bearings by the old method of "grab the back of the rear wheel and try to wiggle side to side". I can also check steering head bearings for notchy-ness and slop fore and aft. My last bike I replaced the steering head bearings with All Balls roller bearings, but I think it was overkill.

I believe the wheel bearings are sealed and cannot be greased.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
No, they cannot. It would be great if manufacturers installed zerks in the swingarm. I've done it myself on dirt bikes, but they don't and it is usually quite a job to take the swingarm apart. One of the big problems with lubing the steering bearings is supporting the front of the bike without using the handle bars or the forks, and you can't support under the engine without cracking the fairing. Fortunately, steering bearings last a long time if you don't do wheelies, and swing arm bearings likewise.

The service manual calls for just checking the steering bearings periodically and not lubing them, and says nothing about the swing arm.
 

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Whatever you check, DO the wheel bearings. I had a set of fronts freeze up at 65 MPH! Not fun, but I was lucky! I was able to get to the side of the interstate. What saved me? Axle was able to rotate in the forks!
 

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I am just glad to know you have logged that kind of mileage on the bike. I have 17,000mi on my’16 & am looking forward to putting on many, many more miles down the road. ????
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Whatever you check, DO the wheel bearings. I had a set of fronts freeze up at 65 MPH! Not fun, but I was lucky! I was able to get to the side of the interstate. What saved me? Axle was able to rotate in the forks!
Like I said above, the wheel bearings are sealed. When I mount new tires I static balance them and I would notice when a wheel bearing is going bad.
 

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Like I said above, the wheel bearings are sealed. When I mount new tires I static balance them and I would notice when a wheel bearing is going bad.
First of all, sealed bearings are not as "sealed" as you might think. They have been known to go, AND, it is possible under pressure to force grease into and through them!

Secondly, "checking" them at slow speed is not good enough. At high speeds they are much hotter and at that time more prone to seizing up. What could happen, is to have just enough grease in them so you THINK they are OK and later have a seize.

I think the best way to handle it is to simply replace with new periodically. I can tell you, that 50,000 miles is plenty to put on those bearings, and new bearings (not from dealer, but from a bearing distributor) are relatively cheap. I think the last set I purchased, they were only $5 or $6 each. Even the same brand as original OEM.
 

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I think the best way to handle it is to simply replace with new periodically. I can tell you, that 50,000 miles is plenty to put on those bearings, and new bearings (not from dealer, but from a bearing distributor) are relatively cheap. I think the last set I purchased, they were only $5 or $6 each. Even the same brand as original OEM.
Interesting. I take note of that. I hope to reach those 50,000 miles on my bike and replace those bearings, some day. It makes sense.
 

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I disagree. A bad bearing is obvious when turned slowly.
Not true. When the grease amount is next to nil, you can turn it, and it will "feel" fine! Why take a 60-70 mph chance for a few dollars? At 50K miles, it is CHEAP insurance to either get new bearings, or figure out ways to grease. There are ways to grease them - I actually made a wheel greaser for several of my previous bikes. It forced grease into the bearing without removing them. All I had to do was to remove the wheels from the bike.

Having worked in a machine shop for dozens of years, every customer we had, when we worked on their product, automatically wanted a bearing replacement regardless of the perceived condition of the bearings.

Most bearings like this only cost a few dollars.

Believe me, after my experience of a seized up front bearing at 70 mph, I took more seriously the notion of greasing my wheel bearings!
 
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