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Hi I purchased a 2020 Cbr500r I wanted to kno some ideas on changing the sprocket to stretch the gears because first gear is really really short but I don’t know wat to look it to anyone has any ideas or ideas of something else to do ??
 

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Hi I purchased a 2020 Cbr500r I wanted to kno some ideas on changing the sprocket to stretch the gears because first gear is really really short but I don’t know wat to look it to anyone has any ideas or ideas of something else to do ??
The trend mostly seems to be shorter for the uk and taller for other folks 🤔 Must be our road network.
 

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Here, if I ride out of my neighborhood, I'm riding 45+ MPH straight away. Even on secondary two lanes, I'm routinely doing sustained speeds of 60-65 MPH. If I take the Interstate anywhere, I'm doing anywhere from 70 to 90 plus MPH to avoid all the cagers on their phones. And in portions of The States - it's flat, straight and FAST riding. Thankfully I've got loads of scenic riding to enjoy. I'd get bored to tears riding nothing but straight roadways.
 

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A 17T countershaft sprocket went on my '17 F model before the first oil change and is a necessary upgrade. You'll need to grind away a little metal from the removable OEM case saver, and then replace it, but that is described in photos in the thread on changing gearing. Your original chain will fit fine. Just move the rear axle as far forward as possible and then adjust it to the recommended slack.. Once done, your speedometer will read about 6% slow, so mentally add about 3-4 mph to your speedometer reading. Your odometer, unlike the speedometer, is not optimistic and when checking your miles traveled of fuel consumption, I add 13% to the miles reported since last fill up.

Ralph
 
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your speedometer will read about 6% slow, so mentally add about 3-4 mph to your speedometer reading. Your odometer, unlike the speedometer, is not optimistic and when checking your miles traveled of fuel consumption, I add 13% to the miles reported since last fill up.
Ralph
Ralph, that's way too much math for a simpleton like me. I just play with the numbers until my results make me happy... and hope I'm close. ;)
 

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Airhead: the nice officer who pulls you over will be happy to confirm the accuracy of you speedometer readings!
Good point. Honestly, I've never owned a bike that had an accurate speedometer. All have read between 5-10% optimistic... say actual speed is 54mph when speedometer reads 60mph. I know the discrepancy is there, but like a lot of things in my aging world.. I just pretend all's well and enjoy the ride. :whistle:
 

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In the U.K. a speedo must show a speed no greater than the actual speed, and when between 25 and 70 mph a speed no less than the actual speed ÷ 10 + 6¼ mph.

Supposedly all vehicle manufacturers therefore set their speedos to understate the speed to avoid breaking that law.
 

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Here in California we have this informal 10% rule, if you push 10% faster than the speed signs you might get by concerning tickets (to take into account wrong speedometers) -- but it depends on the police officer and the circumstances as well, for example speeding around a school with children present.
 

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That is the same here, the National Police Chief's Council recommend not enforcing the speed limit until over it by 10% + 2 mph. But as with you it depends on the officer, as they are obviously entitled to enforce the legal limit. And though the motorway limit is 70 mph, normally you would be unlucky to be penalized at 80 mph unless committing some other offence like hogging (not keeping left unless overtaking) or using your phone.

My speedo shows 22 for what the G.P.S. says is 20 mph up to 87 for what the G.P.S. says is 80 mph, so applying a 10% rule (22 for 20, 33 for 30, 44 for 40 etc.) roughly works as a manual correction and still gives a little extra safety margin before you would get stopped.

Even with different sized sprockets, once you have calibrated the difference against a G.P.S. it would be easy to learn a similar way of correcting them.
 

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I suspect the mileage listing will also differ.
I would not mock with the sprockets. What I saw from 2200 miles or riding, yes cb500F is designed for street riding (if nothing else, the 2019-20 LCD display is beatiful at night, dismal in California sun). But for overall highway riding, and I did a lot last week, the sprocket settings are just fine (for me).
 

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Did you buy a tinted screen? If so the shade from that should help keep the sun off the display although a clear one might have some benefit diffusing the light too. I wish you could keep the backlight on as, at least on the older 2016 model, the screen can be hard to read when using my helmet's internal sun visor. I have to tilt my head up so I can look down and underneath it!

The only thing which tempts me to change sprocket size are the posts that say how much better it makes the bike at low speed, removing the jerkiness in first gear. That is my least favourite thing about the bike.

Otherwise I have no problem with the stock gearing, and I tend to run in a higher gear when I can anyway so have no need for longer gears. For example with 30 limits I would use third gear in towns where it is stop-start, but in villages where you can just cruise though I would stay in fourth.
 

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I doubt tinted screen helps with the 19-20 LCDs, I built a frame around it for the trip and the shadow was marginal but the contrast - even when pushed to max -- is not enough for direct sunlight or even indirect sunlight. But if I put in a screen, it will be dark smoke just to help with this issue somewhat. I think Honda also understood this LCD issue as the 2021 LCD panels are different. Bigger fonts as well.

Every bike I owned had their own character with the lower gears, just a matter of learning how the bike behaves and adjust. The only thing I noticed was that the range between the gears is short, but then again it's just a matter of changing how to switch gears, so for me it's not a big deal.

I'm more worried about sprocket changes causing issues with settings that are optimized by the engineers and new settings will create more chain tear, slack issues, gearbox wear and so on. Better stay away from that, for me at least. The one-year warranty will for sure be voided with such an operation.
 
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