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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
EDIT: Resolved! (post #5)

Hello Everyone,

Picked up a CBR500R here in Canada as a fourth bike, following an old Ninja 250, FZ6, and FZ6R.

One thing I noticed is that the '19 500R doesn't illuminate the front signals at low brightness for normal running like the 500X does (as well as previous 500Rs).

Since the bikes are so similar, does anyone know if it's possible to enable them as a setting (or have the dealer do it)? I really feel like it helps oncoming drivers distinguish it as a vehicle and gauge distance.



We also strangely don't get a flash-to-pass button for the highbeam here.

Thanks and safe riding!
 

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There is somehow a regulatory issue what prevents those yellow dlrs and flash to pass switches in your region.
Both need hardware change as light is not managed by an electronic can bus commander on these bikes yet.
Worths a look on the relevant wiring harnesses. I remember @tothezenith has done an indicator running light retrofit on his ride recently. As for the flash to pass switch I believe changing the left switchgear would solve that issue.
 

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In the uk lots of bikers add small led daytime running lights. And any form of flash at junctions etc to other road users is not recommended as it may give the wrong signal on what you are saying, other than an oncoming bike of coarse. Flash to pass is fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
There is somehow a regulatory issue what prevents those yellow dlrs and flash to pass switches in your region.
Both need hardware change as light is not managed by an electronic can bus commander on these bikes yet.
Worths a look on the relevant wiring harnesses. I remember @tothezenith has done an indicator running light retrofit on his ride recently. As for the flash to pass switch I believe changing the left switchgear would solve that issue.
Lots of bikes have the amber lights on the front here in Canada... it seems like they are neither required nor prohibited. I'll look into wire harnesses and maybe see what Honda Canada says if they can provide any insight.

Also flash-to-pass is very common on bikes here as well. I'm not sure why it was omitted on these models here, but seems strange as it can't save Honda much money to make a whole separate part just to omit it.

Thank you for the replies.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It turns out that something got disconnected during PDI, according to the dealer. The amber running lights are now always on, although apparently they aren't in other regions in the world.

I like having the two orange, two low beams, and two white LEDs on. It's also nice that when you use the signals, the signal LED alternates between full brightness and off (rather than full brightness and the running light brightness) -- increases the contrast of the signal.

Loving this bike. Might do a review with some Ottawa urban scenery.
 

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Lots of bikes have the amber lights on the front here in Canada... it seems like they are neither required nor prohibited. I'll look into wire harnesses and maybe see what Honda Canada says if they can provide any insight.

Also flash-to-pass is very common on bikes here as well. I'm not sure why it was omitted on these models here, but seems strange as it can't save Honda much money to make a whole separate part just to omit it.

Thank you for the replies.
That's why I've said it must be some regulation issue, because as far as I know the bikes have the indicator running lights, so it has to be some kind of conscious decision to sell market specific models.
 

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Here's the thread I wrote for what I did to get it working

Basically if the region doesn't have it, the wiring loom didn't have the section between where the left switch assembly joins to the front sub-harness. Also, the left indicator switch is different.
Get a sewing assembly from a bike that already has it if easiest. Then just some wires to join the to the front sub-harness.
 

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Some countries it's mandatory, others like in Australia it's optional or "as per manufacturer", may be banned in others; best to check with your local regulations.
Interestingly, all the switches I found with the relevant indicator switch didn't have the push to pass button. I'm yet to Frankenstein my US switch into my AU assembly.
 

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Most of us are familiar with the ECE 22.05 regulation, as it is a legal standard for helmets in many parts of the world. It is part of a set of regulations designed for international harmonization of vehicle standards.

The ECE 87 regulation concerns daylight running lights on vehicles and has been widely adopted, including by the U.K., E.U., N.Z., as well as by countries with one word names. Notably, it states that "the colour of the light shall be white," which is probably why the use of direction indicators as a running light is only offered by Honda in limited markets.


Almost a decade ago the E.U. made it a legal requirement for all new cars to be fitted with daytime running lights. This did not apply to motorcycles, though, so there is no requirement on Honda to provide an alternative form to bikes sold here. This is why, as ADIOS600 said, it is very common for riders in the U.K. to add their own.

In some parts of the U.S., flashing the high beam violates state laws. I would guess because that makes it a less important feature, Honda do not include a pass switch to flash the high beam on North American models to save money. The same reason they do not fit side reflectors on bikes sold in the U.K.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Most of us are familiar with the ECE 22.05 regulation, as it is a legal standard for helmets in many parts of the world. It is part of a set of regulations designed for international harmonization of vehicle standards.

The ECE 87 regulation concerns daylight running lights on vehicles and has been widely adopted, including by the U.K., E.U., N.Z., as well as by countries with one word names. Notably, it states that "the colour of the light shall be white," which is probably why the use of direction indicators as a running light is only offered by Honda in limited markets.


Almost a decade ago the E.U. made it a legal requirement for all new cars to be fitted with daytime running lights. This did not apply to motorcycles, though, so there is no requirement on Honda to provide an alternative form to bikes sold here. This is why, as ADIOS600 said, it is very common for riders in the U.K. to add their own.

In some parts of the U.S., flashing the high beam violates state laws. I would guess because that makes it a less important feature, Honda do not include a pass switch to flash the high beam on North American models to save money. The same reason they do not fit side reflectors on bikes sold in the U.K.
Here in Canada, bikes must have their full headlight system on at all times (front low beam and rear light). However, bikes may or may not have amber running lights on the front in addition to the main lights.

I can't why imagine any country that requires a white front running light would prohibit additional amber lights common to many motorcycles and cars.

As for flash-to-pass, it seems to make sense since you need to be able to signal to other vehicles and your hand may be occupied with the clutch. In fact, we are required on our riding test to always have it in gear at stops with the clutch in, never in neutral -- so flashing is about all we have!
 

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Whilst there is no legal requirement in the U.K. for any permanent daytime lighting, all road bikes sold have the front and rear position lights permanently lit when the power is on. Technically you can remove your lights completely and still be able to pass the required annual roadworthyness test (the M.O.T.), though it would obviously be illegal to ride at night.

I think the issue with amber running lights is to avoid confusion with the other functions that colour is used for. Essentially all rear facing lights are red, front facing ones are white, with the exception of amber lights used for direction indicators, hazard signals, and side markers. There are some exceptions for older vehicles, but that is the standard now.

It seems a good system as in an unlit environment you instantly know which way a distant vehicle is facing simply from the colour. Static amber will always mean it is the side of a vehicle as front and rear use will always be flashing.

There is no requirement on the tests, or in law, for what you do when stopped here.

The off-road manoeuvres test (mod 1) you have to always act as though you are on a road, which mainly means checking both ways before setting off. For that I went into neutral whenever I stopped after each exercise as I would then be waiting for the examiner to come over with further instructions.

The road test (mod 2) I do not think I stopped anywhere for long enough to justify dropping into neutral. Living in London meant most of the test was on residential streets, and it went nowhere with a limit above 30 mph.

Although if I did go into neutral more often it would reduce how many times I find myself setting off in third. There are also times I wish I could cancel the stop light when stopped with there clutch in, particularly in a queue at night to avoid dazzling a driver behind me.
 

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Most of us are familiar with the ECE 22.05 regulation, as it is a legal standard for helmets in many parts of the world. It is part of a set of regulations designed for international harmonization of vehicle standards.

The ECE 87 regulation concerns daylight running lights on vehicles and has been widely adopted, including by the U.K., E.U., N.Z., as well as by countries with one word names. Notably, it states that "the colour of the light shall be white," which is probably why the use of direction indicators as a running light is only offered by Honda in limited markets.


Almost a decade ago the E.U. made it a legal requirement for all new cars to be fitted with daytime running lights. This did not apply to motorcycles, though, so there is no requirement on Honda to provide an alternative form to bikes sold here. This is why, as ADIOS600 said, it is very common for riders in the U.K. to add their own.

In some parts of the U.S., flashing the high beam violates state laws. I would guess because that makes it a less important feature, Honda do not include a pass switch to flash the high beam on North American models to save money. The same reason they do not fit side reflectors on bikes sold in the U.K.
My 2018 CB500F came complete with running lights and side reflectors by the front mdguard (fender in USof A and Canada) from new, so not sure where you got that idea about the UK.
 

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Also the rear brake/stop light only stays on if you have either your foot on the rear brake pedal or hand pressing the front brake lever. It shouldn't work just by being stopped with the clutch lever in.
 

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My 2018 CB500F came complete with running lights and side reflectors by the front mdguard (fender in USof A and Canada) from new, so not sure where you got that idea about the UK.
It got the idea from my 2016 bike not having one, although a quick look at the photos on eBay seems to suggest it changed with the 2017 model!

However my point was that they are not a legal requirement in the U.K., which is definitely still the case. That would mean it is also not an E.U. requirement, though it may be one in individual countries. So possibly another country now requires them, so it has become cheaper for Honda to fit them on all European models? In the U.K. the only legally required reflector is a red rear one, and bizarrely that is only if you have working position lights.

As for running lights, how has it been implemented on your bike? Maybe they have been made a legal requirement somewhere else in Europe too? The Honda website does not show any included on their photos of the 2020 model, only the dipped headlamp is lit in them.


That is a fair point on the stop light, and is due to how I operate the bike. If I am in neutral, and on flat ground, I will put both feet on the ground for better balance. Maybe it is being 5'8" but I do not feel comfortable balancing the bike with one foot. However if I am holding the clutch in then I keep a foot on the rear brake, both in case my hand slips and to counter balance the (little) pressure my hand is applying to the left. I actually do not know how dazzling my stop light is to other drivers behind me, but what is reflected back in my mirrors is too bright.

What I would really love is some kind of parking brake so I can put both feet on the ground and rest both hands when on a hill. You can do this by staying in gear and flipping the engine cut off, but it is not ideal.
 
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