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Hi, I'm seriously considering a CBR500R for highway driving but braking distance matters to me a lot because I have had bad experience with bad brakes in the past. And there's a lot of wildlife on the road. i will be commuting at night too.

I need the good fuel economy. Plus the heavy weight of the bike is good for countering turbulence while passing trailers. The only thing im worried about is if I can stop that heavy machinery in time.

Can anyone chime in on what kind of braking distance (preferable in feet or metres) the bike consistently achieves from 30-0 and from 60-0 (Mph)?

I've been looking for this piece of information all over the internet but couldn't find it. :((((
 

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Unlike automobile tests/reviews that typically measure braking distances, I'm not aware of any routine testing for motorcycles during test rides. At best, you'll find something akin to "adequate", "soft", etc... and that's nothing more than the test rider's opinion. But, I can tell you for sure your braking capabilities, especially in an emergency, will be improved by getting the available ABS option on you CBR.:nerd:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thanks for the reply. There's ample information on the ninja 400 and r3 regarding braking distance but i can't find any on the cbr500r.its surprising no one knows about it on the forums, reddit or even the honda support guys.
 

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I cannot give you any specs, but I can say that the engine braking on this machine is enough to give you sore balls if you aren't careful. I joke that you don't even need brakes because of it.

There's plenty of braking power to lock both wheels up without trying too hard (mine is non-ABS, but I agree that getting ABS can help to inspire confidence). So it's not really about braking power. It's about traction and weight. The 500 weighs in at over 400 lbs. It's not a light machine, but then it's not overly heavy either. I started out on the 500, and I haven't found myself in a situation yet where the brakes weren't enough. And I've had a few close calls over the years.

That's anecdotal and basically useless, but that's probably the best you'll get unless somebody opts to record themselves testing these things. If you haven't seen it yet then you probably won't. That said, I don't suppose you can really map those specs to real world performance.

What's probably more useful is knowing your riding history. What bikes have you ridden before that you felt had inadequate braking? This community has attracted all kinds of riders from complete newbies to seasoned veterans of 50 or 60 years. There is a wealth of information here to compare this bike to others. You just need to ask right the questions.
 

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My 2c: I think there's too many variables to be able to rely on a 60-0 distance from one test under what are likely completely different riding conditions than you may face.

The bike has a full-size (120mm) front tire, a 320mm rotor and a decent caliper and pads on the front. The bike is actually pretty light (~425-lbs wet) and that, coupled with ABS this means that for everyday riding the bike probably has more brake than you should ever need.

Your skills and style of riding will dictate your braking requirements as much as anything. If you ride at night you need to understand the concept of not out-riding your headlight: The headlight projection distance is a fixed value but by covering that distance in a shorter time at higher speed, you gouge into distance with reaction time and the added distance covered before the brake pads even make contact with the rotor. You need to get into the habit of watching for the retro-reflective eyes of critters lurking on the shoulders. If the area you ride in is heavy with raccoons and and larger animals raccoons I strongly suggest not riding at all in those areas; no brake or reaction time is going to help if the animal comes from your 3-o'clock at full-chat and mid-jump.

If you ride on the highway always have a way out; it does no good if you can brake and stop on a dime but the guy in the F-150 behind you can't. On public roads, riding with situational awareness, sensibly and defensively in traffic so that you never really need to panic-brake is better than the best dual-rotor Brembo Stylema setup out there.
 

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I agree with the others that the CBR500R brakes are more than adequate. In traffic and on the highway, engine braking is more than enough for most situations.
 
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