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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,
Shoe box full of bolts. Need a photo to help ID my front seat bolts lol. The pair i thought were ain't it Thanks!
 

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On my 2014 the bolts are silver with small round heads. There is a 5mm hex recess in the head. If my memory is correct, the sides of the head have vertical serrations and the bolt length is roughly 1-1/4 inches.

Remember these bolts are used with good sized washers. These special washers have a short sleeve protruding on the bottom side that fits into the seat mount.

If you are like me, you probably put both these parts "somewhere safe" so you could find them again. Good luck.

My bike is in snow-covered storage so no photo.
 
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I would like in a parts catalogue such as partzilla.com to find the appropriate bolt. If clicking on it does not show a photo of the bolt, then searching for the part number will usually find another seller with photos. But the part name will also include the bolt size anyway, so you can use a non-O.E.M. one as a replacement.

One of my seat bolts was a little loose, and when I got it back after a dealer service they had replaced it with a deridingly non-original bolt, instead having a big cap head. Not that it made any real difference as the problem was with the thread. But it is definitely a place where any correctly size bolt will work.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Went to a local hardware store that had a neatly organized fasteners section. I now have two bolts. Bad news while the thread pitch is good, the head is 4mm instead of 5mm lol
 

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Years ago, when I did repairs like this on bikes I expected to keep a long time (3 Vintage BMW's), I would be sure to replace most bolts with stainless bolts & screws. Do NOT do this on bolts that are critical to torquing, etc., like engine head bolts. On a bike, this would help keep a good appearance so the bolts would not rust.

A great source is McMaster-Carr for these and virtually any other item you may want. You have to purchase "packs" instead of just one or two bolts, but a pack is usually less expensive than the 1 or 2 purchase!
 
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As I have posted in the past,. using bolts to secure the rider's seat is unnecessarily difficult. Better to make two 30mm studs of 6mm x 1.0 thread stainless steel. I bought long,. stainless bolts and cut the heads off. Better check the diameter and thread pitch, as I'm writing this from a very old memory. Loctite (blue) the studs into the threaded holes that originally held the Allen bolts to secure the seat. It is much easier to simply drop the seat onto the studs, then fit wide washers and nuts onto the studs, than to try (repeatedly) to get the OEM Allen bolts properly to engage the threads. This was the first modification I made to my new '17 F model, not a week after I'd gotten it. Honda's fitment of this seat is a disgrace. I removed the seat from my 1974 Norton Commando this morning and if I say it took 6 seconds that's an exaggeration on the high side. Two thumb-wheels loosened slightly, one in each hand, and pull off the seat.

Ralph
 

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Yes I don't know the rationale with the bolts for a seat, for most other bikes I've seen it's a simple snap-off operation. Do people steal lead batteries? Do seats fall off with a crash (should not make a difference then either)?
 

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Yes I don't know the rationale with the bolts for a seat, for most other bikes I've seen it's a simple snap-off operation. Do people steal lead batteries? Do seats fall off with a crash (should not make a different then either)?

Lawyers rule, I suppose. It cannot be that Honda lacked the resources to do a better job of securing the seat.
Ralph
 
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