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Discussion Starter #1
Wishing to fit a vacuum-activated Scottoiler to my bike, I looked at the Honda shop manual for a vacuum hose which is necessary for such installation. Found none. Can anyone tell me if there is a vacuum source on this model? I'm not comfortable tapping into an intake manifold to source a vacuum and dislike the spraying of chain goo on my bike's rear chain at regular intervals.

Thanks,

Ralph
 

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There should be some existing vacuum lines coming from your intake to the charcoal canister. Tap one with a T fitting for vacuum. You want to use intake vacuum, since it will correlate the vacuum provided with your revs, giving more oil the faster you go.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, Jello. That helps a lot. Actually, the vacuum applied to the Scottoiler (I've fitted several to bikes over the last 30 years) only allows the flow of light oil from the fluid reservoir to the chain. The frequency of drops is controlled by rotating the reservoir cap. I generally use one drop per 45-60 seconds. Does wonders for chain life and is very easy to clean from the nearby areas of the frame and rear wheel rim.

Ralph
 
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Discussion Starter #5
add some pics and a link to what you bought when your done.
i have a horrible habit of forgetting to oil my chain for a very long time.. always wanted an auto oil. please share your progress :)
It may be a few weeks before I get to it. Meanwhile, search "Scottoiler" on the Net and learn about them.

"Jello" on this forum suggested the vacuum line to the charcoal canister and on digging into Scottoiler's website re which models are applicable, indeed the 2017 and later Honda CB-500 EFI models can source the canister vacuum line. Even have photos and a how to. The carbureted models also are suitable for a Scottoiler.

I've used Scottoilers on about 4 prior bikes and presently have one fitted to my 2016 Suzuki DR-650.. The light oil reservoir holds about 250cc of the maker's oil or ATF. I find I refill the reservoir after about 600-800 miles and I probably use more oil flow than necessary. (Oil is cheap--best quality chains are not!). It has been my experience to get 25K miles on a chain and I have yet to replace a sprocket even at 50K road miles. My take is that the Scottoilers pay for themselves and there's the bonus of much less owner involvement in chain lubrication.

Ralph
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Correction to my post of 3 days ago re fitment of a Scottoiler to a CB-500 Honda:

Scottoiler staff advise that the pre-EFI bikes (2013-2016?) do not have a vacuum source unless fitted with a vacuum canister from the factory. I'd thought there must be a vacuum line to a vacuum-activated fuel tap, but apparently such is not the case. An electronically-activated Scottoiler would work for those bikes but at a cost nearly double that of the standard, vacuum-activated device.

Ralph
 

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Most motorcycles with more than one carburetor usually have a nipple on each inlet tract for connecting a vaccum balance (Carb synchronization) tool, you should be able to pull the rubber boot of the nipple and connect your scott oiler to that. Otherwise it might be a threaded hole with a screw in it (to seal it) that you unscrew and then screw you carb balance tool into, so just buy a spare balance tool nipple, remove the screw, screw the nipple in and connect your scott oiler in place.. Of course if the CBR only has a single carb, then none of this is of any use!!


Gary
 

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Scottoiler staff advise that the pre-EFI bikes (2013-2016?) do not have a vacuum source unless fitted with a vacuum canister from the factory. I'd thought there must be a vacuum line to a vacuum-activated fuel tap, but apparently such is not the case. An electronically-activated Scottoiler would work for those bikes but at a cost nearly double that of the standard, vacuum-activated device.

Ralph
The new cb500 series 2013 onwards all use EFI. Earlier CB500 bikes (thise had no F R or X suffixes) had carbs.
The EU bikes I've been working on had no vacuum sources for balancing, and they came balanced from the factory. There are provisions to make a threaded vacuum source per cylinder on the throttle body, but that's a bit more involved as the airbox and TBs have to come off to do so.
 

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Scottoiler staff advise that the pre-EFI bikes (2013-2016?) do not have a vacuum source unless fitted with a vacuum canister from the factory. I'd thought there must be a vacuum line to a vacuum-activated fuel tap, but apparently such is not the case. An electronically-activated Scottoiler would work for those bikes but at a cost nearly double that of the standard, vacuum-activated device.

Ralph
The new cb500 series 2013 onwards all use EFI. Earlier CB500 bikes (thise had no F R or X suffixes) had carbs.
The EU bikes I've been working on had no vacuum sources for balancing, and they came balanced from the factory. There are provisions to make a threaded vacuum source per cylinder on the throttle body, but that's a bit more involved as the airbox and TBs have to come off to do so.
Interesting. I would think any multiple cylinder bike would need periodic balancing. I just got my cbr500, so I haven't dug into it too far yet. My other bike (08 monster S2r) has a throttle body balance screw, and air bleeds on the TBs, with vacuum, and nipples for hooking up an manometer. You rough balance vacuum with the balancing screw, then fine tune with the air bleeds. Getting it perfect makes the low rpm range smooth.
 

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Interesting. I would think any multiple cylinder bike would need periodic balancing. I just got my cbr500, so I haven't dug into it too far yet. My other bike (08 monster S2r) has a throttle body balance screw, and air bleeds on the TBs, with vacuum, and nipples for hooking up an manometer. You rough balance vacuum with the balancing screw, then fine tune with the air bleeds. Getting it perfect makes the low rpm range smooth.
As far as I understand, your Monster is a V2 with individual TBs.
The cb is a 2in line, with a single TB with two channels, where the TB butterflies are fixed on the same axle - so they age together of anything. Therefore there are air bleed screws, bit they're set in the factory once for good.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Perhaps the final note on this thread: The only CB-500s that will have a vacuum source are those with an evaporative canister. I believe this includes must EU spec bikes and the California spec US bikes. The CB-500s sold in the rest of the USA do not appear to have evaporative canisters and hence have no vacuum hose to tap into to activate a Scottoiler. This is confirmed in the Honda Factory Service Manual which depicts emissions controls. No canister for my Texas bike. Bummer.

For those lucky CB-500 owners whose bikes have a canister, the Scottoiler is a wonderful addition. I am green with envy thinking about your bikes.

Ralph
 
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For those lucky CB-500 owners whose bikes have a canister, the Scottoiler is a wonderful addition. I am green with envy thinking about your bikes.

Ralph
Ralph, I think you said Scottoiler has an electric system. Are these cost prohibitive, or overcomplicated?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Ralph, I think you said Scottoiler has an electric system. Are these cost prohibitive, or overcomplicated?
Advertised price around @250. I'll stick to the spray lube. I must wonder, tho, if there is enough vacuum in the air box behind the injectors to tap into that source to begin and end chain lube flow from the Scottoiler. All the vacuum is for is to lift a little "float needle" type of device to allow chain oil to flow when the engine is running. I hate to give up on the Scottoiler. Such a **** handy device. I've had 4 prior on other bikes.

Ralph.
 

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All the vacuum is for is to lift a little "float needle" type of device to allow chain oil to flow when the engine is running. I hate to give up on the Scottoiler. Such a **** handy device. I've had 4 prior on other bikes.
Ralph.
Ralph, Maybe a silly idea, but any possibility of adding a cheap, 12V air/vacuum pump somewhere out of the way on the bike? It may require a timer, or more simply, toggle switch to cut on/off. I haven't thought it through, but it may be doable. And then again, it may be more burdensome than helpful.
 

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Ralph, I think you said Scottoiler has an electric system. Are these cost prohibitive, or overcomplicated?
Advertised price around @250. I'll stick to the spray lube. I must wonder, tho, if there is enough vacuum in the air box behind the injectors to tap into that source to begin and end chain lube flow from the Scottoiler. All the vacuum is for is to lift a little "float needle" type of device to allow chain oil to flow when the engine is running. I hate to give up on the Scottoiler. Such a **** handy device. I've had 4 prior on other bikes.

Ralph.
Ralph,
Dunno how much time and wrench swinging ability you have, but drilling and tapping the oem throttle bodies at the same location where Cali bikes have their vacuum source is fairly easy.
I've done it on mine to be able to balance the overbored TB, so I know it can be easily done, as the provisions are cast to the body.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks for the latest suggestions. All worthy of consideration. I have 66 years of riding/wrenching experience and was a dealership mechanic for Velocette, BSA and Honda dealerships (Long, long ago!).
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Having done some quick "research", I'm going with the Airhead (certainly not indicative of your intelligence!) suggestion and will add a 12vDC micro suction pump to the CB-500F and see how that goes. Although Sicilian by heritage, I truly am a Scotsman at heart (Highest praise for that!) and am spending all of $4USD to buy the pump from its China maker. May take a while to get here across the Silk Road and via a junk from Shanghai, but I'm patient.

I am wary of tapping into the inlet manifold and although an electric chain oiler has clear appeal, I already have a new, in box Scottoiler traditional. So, four bucks for a good trial works for me. I'll use a toggle switch on the handlebar to operate the pump and it will be wired directly to the battery and fused. The truth is, a continuous drip onto the chain is not absolutely necessary and an hour every week with moderate oil flow onto the chain should suffice. I likely will ride 4-5 hours (175-250 miles) a week on the Honda and an hour of intermittent drips of oil should suffice. If the suction of the pump appears excessive, I can drill a few small pressure-relief holes in the vacuum line. Don't want to damage my precious Scottoiler. "Just enough" suction is all I should need.

It will be a while before this installation can be accomplished, but I'll report on this thread when I'm done. Likely by mid-August if past purchases from China are any guide.
 
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Ralph, I hope that works out for you. The "airhead83" came from an 83 BMW I rode for 34 years. It had air cooled heads, thus airhead. But if there's any question about it being an indication of my smarts, or lack thereof, just ask either of my 2 grown children. They'll verify, I as dumb as a rock.:wink:
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Airhead: I well am aware of the origin of your nick-name, having owned a 1964 R-60 "mit seitenwagen" and a 1965 R-27, both restored by myself many years ago. Sold them in 1990 and 2018 respectively. Grand bikes of an era that established BMW as a quality brand to be pursued by serious riders of the day.

Ralph
 
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