How many of you do your own maintenance? - Honda CBR500R Forum : CB500F and CB500X Forums
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post #1 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-13-2013, 02:44 PM Thread Starter
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How many of you do your own maintenance?

Does anyone do their own maintenance? Or plan to do their own on the CBR500?

Things like changing tires, brakes, oil, lubricating parts. Replacing things.

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post #2 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-13-2013, 11:31 PM
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I saw on another thread and everybody seems to be bringing their bike to the mechanic or dealer to have them serviced and maintained. The farthest I have gone is changing the oil and cleaning and lubricating the chain. I dont trust myself to replace things and would leave that to someone with more experience and knowledge. Two things i would never consider to replace is the chain and brakes. If a chain wee to come loose the first thing thats coming off is your leg, acting like a chain saw. Just narly. And brakes I wouldnt want to screw with because if it fails, ka plunk and see yah.
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post #3 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-14-2013, 12:13 AM
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If you plan to do much you do need to order the shop manual. I try to do the routine maintenance; the worst item to date was stripping the head and cams when replacing the shims (under bucket) doing the NX250's valve adjustment.

Also, I am old and lazy. My local independent bike shop charges $15/wheel to install tires that you order from them (they are price competitive) so I remove the wheels and take them to the shop when it is time for a new tire or two.

Being retired permits me to consider my bikes to be "hobbies", so there is sufficient time to do the work. However, I would rather be riding than wrenching.

John '14CB500XA (White), '09CRF230L (L'il Red Piglet), '89NX250 (sold, White)

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post #4 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-14-2013, 12:50 PM Thread Starter
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For jobs that take too long I do take them to a shop. Unless I have a weekend when I am totally free and can't ride anyways (raining or bad weather)

For small things like oil changes I actually enjoy doing. It doesn't take long and I like to know that the bike is getting good treatment from me by the means of fresh oil
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post #5 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-15-2013, 02:15 PM
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I would like to work on my bike but its really hard to find time especially after work having to deal with the small one. I'd rather get it done at a shop, experience and knowledge = less screw ups and wait time. I take a ride whenever I get the chance, wait times are killer. Can't wait for the weather to clear up over here.

Four wheels move the body. Two wheels move the soul.
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post #6 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-15-2013, 11:17 PM
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Not me I have a barn just for the bikes. Started working on bike with my father ever since I was a teen. There is really nothing to it as long as your somewhat mechanically inclined. And newer bikes these day are not as tricky as before. Carburetors bikes were a pain in the arse to start back then but still appreciate them so much.
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post #7 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-18-2013, 07:18 AM
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Originally Posted by Gilesbama View Post
Not me I have a barn just for the bikes. Started working on bike with my father ever since I was a teen. There is really nothing to it as long as your somewhat mechanically inclined. And newer bikes these day are not as tricky as before. Carburetors bikes were a pain in the arse to start back then but still appreciate them so much.
your so lucky to have the space and time. What kinds of work or maintenance have you done on motorcycles? I've heard a fare share of stories of the older bikes that wouldn't start once if the air was moist or while it's raining. Glad we don't have to deal with that now.

Do you have any pictures of you barn/garage where you work on your bikes?

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post #8 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-18-2013, 07:36 AM
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I'll be doing the simple maintenance on the thing. And I would like to do all my own servicing in the future and develop shop skills, I was thinking of buying an old dirt bike for that.

But trying to re-sell a bike like this that 'only I've worked on' might be tricky. I plan on keeping the CBR for about 2 yrs before upgrading to a Super Sport and it'll be easier to sell if the shop babied it, rather then my unskilled hands.

Plus I'd need to buy a shitload of new gear.
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post #9 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-18-2013, 07:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Rowan View Post
I'll be doing the simple maintenance on the thing. And I would like to do all my own servicing in the future and develop shop skills, I was thinking of buying an old dirt bike for that.

But trying to re-sell a bike like this that 'only I've worked on' might be tricky. I plan on keeping the CBR for about 2 yrs before upgrading to a Super Sport and it'll be easier to sell if the shop babied it, rather then my unskilled hands.

Plus I'd need to buy a shitload of new gear.
Learning to service your own bike is key, not only does it help cut down cost but it also makes you understand just exactly how things work on your bike. You'll pick up small things here and there when you pay close attention, some things like look at how your brake pads are wearing when you take them out from the calipers. These things you will never see if you get your bike serviced at the dealership. But it's always best if your somewhat mechanically inclined.

The benefit for getting your bike serviced at the dealership or the shop is that you get receipts and invoices which can be used as a sales pitch to potential buys showing them you keep it maintained giving them a piece of mind.

Four wheels move the body. Two wheels move the soul.
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post #10 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-18-2013, 11:27 PM
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Part of that can be overcome by keeping copies of the parts orders and photos of the work.

As I prefer to buy a used bike, I expect to take it pretty much apart to: inspect brake pads/drums; bleed the brakes; replace the spark plug(s); add an inline fuel filter between the tank and carb/injectors; replace the coolant if the bike isn't air cooled; Check the valve adjustment; and often, replace the chain and sprockets. Sometimes, electrical work is needed too. That is pretty much what it takes to make it safe to ride. Buying the shop manual before starting makes this much easier.

John '14CB500XA (White), '09CRF230L (L'il Red Piglet), '89NX250 (sold, White)

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