General CB500F questions / new owner - Honda CBR500R Forum : CB500F and CB500X Forums
 45Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 32 (permalink) Old 09-08-2019, 08:30 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Mousek801's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 5
General CB500F questions / new owner

Hey guys, new CB500F owner here (~2 weeks). Traded in my Harley Sportster 1200 because I was tired of how slow it was, how expensive repairs were, etc... It was super low and easy to learn on but on to newer and better things. Few questions if you guys have any insights:

1) There's a VERY audible "clunk" when going from 2nd to 1st gear. Is that to let me know I've hit the bottom or should I have the dealer check it out? Still got about 9 months of warranty left. I've also noticed that sometimes the bike will stick in neutral and I'll have to jerk the clutch around or roll a bit before it'll kick down into 1st - is there something I should oil or check?

2) On a group ride today, I had trouble keeping up with guys on ninja 300s / Yamaha R3s in the corners. Is the difference between naked bikes vs sport bikes that pronounced or am I riding "wrong"?

3) Rev range - coming from a Harley I'm used to shifting up at like 4K RPMs. I know the engine doesn't redline until like 9K, but wheres the safe range to cruise at? If run at about 6K RPMs in 3rd gear @ 45MPH, is that bad for the bike to run that hard for long periods of time?

Thanks! Appreciate everyone's input!

chzeckmate likes this.

Recovering cruiser-bro. 2018 CB500F.
Mousek801 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 32 (permalink) Old 09-08-2019, 09:07 PM
Senior Member
 
chzeckmate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Houston
Posts: 1,142
The 500 motor is happy all throughout the rev range. When you and your buddies are getting down in the corners, there's nothing wrong with running up the revs. Those little 300's are nimble and those guys are probably ringing those bikes out. When I'm getting down like that, I'll run it up close to redline before shifting. That's where your power is. I change oil every 2-3k miles and check oil level frequently. I've put 30k miles on it like that and it's running like new.

Sent from my GM1915 using Tapatalk

Male, 44yrs, 180lbs, 5'9", '14 (RWB), 22k miles, Bridgestone BT023, Vortex V3 kit, Rotella T6, KN-204 filter, 87 Octane, Maxima Chain Wax, Puig 6479W windscreen, clear signal lenses, Fork Preload caps, T-Rex spools, Radiator guard, Shorty adjustable levers, Fork stem RAM mount/USB port, red/black alum grips, 300R Rear tire hugger, Rear seat cowl, LED engine/undertail lights w/RF remote, LED position light, Sea level, city commuter, spirited rider, turn my own wrenches.
chzeckmate is offline  
post #3 of 32 (permalink) Old 09-08-2019, 11:20 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mousek801 View Post
2) On a group ride today, I had trouble keeping up with guys on ninja 300s / Yamaha R3s in the corners. Is the difference between naked bikes vs sport bikes that pronounced or am I riding "wrong"?
Cornering is an art. It's a dance with braking, turn-in point, picking an apex, and lean angle. As you get used to the bike you will have the confidence to go faster in the corner.

A first step would be to check if you are trying to keep your body upright while cornering - lean with the bike. CanyonChasers has some good cornering videos on YouTube.

Naked and Sport 300-500 cc bikes are designed to be able to lean way over. More than most riders are comfortable with. more lean = faster speed in corner

Some riders ride every corner as if there will never be any gravel or surprises. You may not want to keep up with those guys...


I cruise in 4th gear at 45mph, 5th gear at 50mph.

2014 CB500F: GSXR600 rear shock, Traxxion fork emulators+springs, Kuryakyn Throttle Boss, IDEA Gear Indicator, Slipstreamer S-06 windscreen, SW-Motech handlebar risers, LED tail light, rubber tank side pads.

Last edited by vt500; 09-08-2019 at 11:31 PM.
vt500 is offline  
 
post #4 of 32 (permalink) Old 09-09-2019, 11:21 AM
Senior Member
 
PiedmontBuckeye's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 577
Don't believe the hype you read on this.



This is a great little bike, but it is NOT a racing machine. It is designed to run at higher RPM's than you may be used to.
It is not a race bike, however, and is designed to cruise at approx. 4-1/2 K up to around 5-1/2 - 6K RPM's no matter what anyone on here will say. The rule of thumb has been for years to run at approximantely 2/3 red line and red line is about 8-3/4 K.

You won't find any knowledgeable person to say that it can run consistently at super-high rpm's, and this includes dealer recommendations, the Honda factory engineers (whom I conversed with about this very issue, and the manual's recommendations for "normal" wear and tear.

Any statements to the contrary are simply blowing smoke up your a$$!!
bambams likes this.

"The difference between death and taxes is that death doesn't change every time congress meets." - Will Rogers
PiedmontBuckeye is offline  
post #5 of 32 (permalink) Old 09-09-2019, 03:42 PM
Not to be nasty, but if you ride your 500 like a Harley (shifting up at less than 4K RPM) then you are going to have trouble keeping up with other friends, Harleys have a big engine with lots of low down torque, your little 500 is a fantastic bike, but does NOT have a lot of torque, so if you want to stay with your friends you are going to need to rev it more, changing up around 8K as suggested is definitely the way to go, but it will take a while before you feel comfortable revving the engine this high, but they do work very well at the higher revs and are designed to be held there so you shouldn't worry about the engine, just get used to keeping it in a gear where the revs are between 6k and 8K RPM. This is probably also the reason you are losing your friends in the bends, they are probably revving their engines more and as they exit the bend they accelerate, you probably do to, but with your revs at 4K or less, not much will happen except your friends will disappear into the distance. Smaller bikes need revving more to make good progress, but the CBR500 is a very good bike and will not suffer from being ridden in a spirited fashion.


Gary
Thrasherg is offline  
post #6 of 32 (permalink) Old 09-09-2019, 08:00 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Mousek801's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 5
Thanks for the input everyone. Appreciate it. I'll keep working at it.

Recovering cruiser-bro. 2018 CB500F.
Mousek801 is offline  
post #7 of 32 (permalink) Old 09-09-2019, 10:35 PM
Senior Member
 
chzeckmate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Houston
Posts: 1,142
One thing I'll mention is that there are some people that will tell you about old "rules of thumb" and give advice that isn't really based on anything other than gut sensations or folklore. They might say that Honda engineers have spoken to them or that they heard something from the motorcycle fairies, but take it with a slice of lime. You can happily shift high in the rev range. The current model 500 has a shift indicator light that blinks at over 8k RPM by default. Honda wouldn't set it there if it would harm anything or diminish the life expectancy of their product. Honda's reliability is legendary. They know that and they aren't going to start taking chances with their reputation now.

Sent from my GM1915 using Tapatalk

Male, 44yrs, 180lbs, 5'9", '14 (RWB), 22k miles, Bridgestone BT023, Vortex V3 kit, Rotella T6, KN-204 filter, 87 Octane, Maxima Chain Wax, Puig 6479W windscreen, clear signal lenses, Fork Preload caps, T-Rex spools, Radiator guard, Shorty adjustable levers, Fork stem RAM mount/USB port, red/black alum grips, 300R Rear tire hugger, Rear seat cowl, LED engine/undertail lights w/RF remote, LED position light, Sea level, city commuter, spirited rider, turn my own wrenches.
chzeckmate is offline  
post #8 of 32 (permalink) Old 09-10-2019, 10:55 AM
Senior Member
 
PiedmontBuckeye's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 577
Quote:
Originally Posted by chzeckmate View Post
One thing I'll mention is that there are some people that will tell you about old "rules of thumb" and give advice that isn't really based on anything other than gut sensations or folklore. They might say that Honda engineers have spoken to them or that they heard something from the motorcycle fairies, but take it with a slice of lime. You can happily shift high in the rev range. The current model 500 has a shift indicator light that blinks at over 8k RPM by default. Honda wouldn't set it there if it would harm anything or diminish the life expectancy of their product. Honda's reliability is legendary. They know that and they aren't going to start taking chances with their reputation now.

Sent from my GM1915 using Tapatalk
This is entirely false. I would ask this poster if he ever worked in a Honda dealer, or did he EVER have ANY factory training.

You won't find ANYONE of Honda of official connection who would agree with this. There is NO "folklore" about it, just contact Honda's customer help and get connected to the engineering staff for technical questions. I have repeatedly demonstrated this poster wrong on many issues especially this one. You ride like he suggests, and your bike will be junk much faster than it needs to be. On THIS issue, I proved him wrong on at least 3 ways: 1) check your owner's manual for shifting suggestions, and then also on the chart where it suggests regular maintenance - a footnote there states that their maintenance suggestions are for normal riding, and if you choose to ride it harder, the "normal" maintenance will have to be done more often. 2) I discussed this very issue with several local Honda dealers and everyone said that to do what the above poster suggested is not how to ride this bike. 3) I have ridden Hondas and a variety of other brands for over 55 years. I have worked in a Honda dealer for some years, and have had factory training. NO ONE over those years would dare to suggest to ride this bike like that. It wasn't made for that! PERIOD!

It is your bike, and you can ride it as you wish - that certainly is your choice, but if you want to ride it correctly and get the most enjoyment you will ignore the above poster's suggestions. I challenge you to take your bike and and cruise at the speed where the bike runs most comfortably and where it runs the smoothest. Mine is around 4,500 to 5,500 K rpms. THAT'S where Honda intended you to cruise with this bike! If the Honda engineers wanted normal cruising at higher RPM's they would have designed it to run smoothest in that range.

Use your common sense and you will see that you should avoid running it hard (as though that is normal and OK) is how this bike will give you the best performance and enjoyability for years to come! It is a great bike when used properly.

"The difference between death and taxes is that death doesn't change every time congress meets." - Will Rogers
PiedmontBuckeye is offline  
post #9 of 32 (permalink) Old 09-10-2019, 11:46 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: London, U.K.
Posts: 185
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by PiedmontBuckeye View Post
1) check your owner's manual for shifting suggestions
This has been discussed before, but not all manuals contain shifting suggestions. So are you saying that Honda use lower quality engines in American models of the bike, as the British manual does not have any such suggestions?

Quote:
Originally Posted by PiedmontBuckeye View Post
on the chart where it suggests regular maintenance - a footnote there states that their maintenance suggestions are for normal riding, and if you choose to ride it harder, the "normal" maintenance will have to be done more often.
This must be another international difference, because I cannot see any such note in mine. All I can see is "3. Service more frequently when riding in rain or at full throttle." And that is applied to the cleaning frequency for the crankcase breather.

If Honda's position on riding full throttle is simply to remove a plug and let a pipe drain out more often than every 8,000 miles, then I can only assume they do not see it as being all that problematic.

They could say never ride that way. They could advise against riding that way. They could say riding that way will damage the bike or shorten its life. But no, they just say remove a plug to let it drain a tad more often.

You are the only person who I have seen say it is bad for the bike riding high in the rev range, and you admit that is based on different forms of anecdotal evidence rather than physical experience of an actual bike that had been ridden that way.

But I have seen plenty of people say they do ride the bike that way, and none of them have reported any problems from having done so. And nor is there anything in the my manual to say that riding within the rev range of a British model, at least, is "incorrect" or riding it "properly".

Maybe I am just naÔve, but my common sense says that if Honda did not want a rider to do so in a particular way they would explicitly say so in the manual.

They would not require you to have 55 years of experience, so you can piece together clues from diagrams and footnotes, (that you may have to go online to find even exist), to make you feel you need to seek out a factory engineer, in order to ask them how you are supposed to ride the bike.

To me that just does not seen a sensible way for a manufacturer to communicate important advice to their customers.
someone is offline  
post #10 of 32 (permalink) Old 09-11-2019, 11:20 PM
Senior Member
 
motohonace's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Sonoma County, California & Borrego Springs, California
Posts: 437
Welcome to the 500 forum scrum Mousek. With one post you have managed to light up an ongoing debate between two respected members with different opinions. I am an old geezer, survived my youth, & now ride simply because I love it. I have nothing to prove to anyone. I simply enjoy the sport & working on my skills. My goal is always to make it home in one piece. While I have found that, as Pied said, the bike seems to like being ridden between 4000-6000+ rpm for most everyday typical situations, it certainly does come alive at 7000 plus. I have great respect for almost anything CZ-mate posts although I do not choose to ride my bike like I just stole it. My only piece to add is donít worry about keeping up with others until you can keep up with yourself. Be Safe, have fun.

Ride like your life depends on it.
motohonace is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Honda CBR500R Forum : CB500F and CB500X Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome