How-To: Change the oil in your 2013 CBR500R/CB500F/X - Honda CBR500R Forum : CB500F and CB500X Forums
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post #1 of 152 (permalink) Old 05-25-2013, 07:41 PM Thread Starter
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Thumbs up How-To: Change the oil in your 2013 CBR500R/CB500F/X

Today was the day that I finally rolled over the magic 600-mile mark (no thanks to the horrid weather for delaying me from achieving it until now), so I settled in to do my first oil change on the CBR. Outlined below is how you, too, can change your own oil instead of relying on some dealership punk to mess with your ride.

What you'll need:

3 quarts of your oil of choice (I used Honda HP4S 10w30)
1 oil filter (OEM Honda filter part number 15410-MFJ-D01)
12mm socket and wrench
Something to catch your old oil in
Shop towels in case you're as messy as I am
Rear stand (not necessary, but highly recommended)



First off, take a short ride! This will get the oil nice and hot and it will flow easier. If you can't do that, just idle the bike for 3-5 minutes. If you so feel inclined, set your bike up on your rear stand.



Crawl up under your little beast and locate the oil pan drain bolt, circled here.



Break that sucker loose with your 12mm socket wrench, and then slowly remove the bolt.



Here is probably where you'll do what I did, and curse whoever decided to put the drain bolt on the side of the pan instead of facing downward. Oil shoots out a good 6-8 inches toward your back tire, so watch out for that. I hope your oil catching device has a larger opening than mine does. Anyway, after it finally dribbles to a halt, put the drain bolt back in and tighten to 22 ft.lbs / 30 N-m, or as I did, "that's probably tight enough." You can replace the sealing washer if you'd like, but at only 600 miles, reusing it is just fine.

Now, the oil filter. You can get at it easy enough with all fairings in place (on the R at least), just have your handlebars turned to the left and go at it from the left side.



Now I'm not sure if the factory puts these on or if it was just my dealership, but mine felt like it was put on by Hercules himself. I eventually had to go at it from below with a large pair of channel lock pliers. It was a tight squeeze, but I managed to turn it JUST enough to get it to break loose.



Now before you go unscrewing the filter all the way off, here's a tip. Place a plastic bag over the filter itself and pull it up over the filter, then slowly turn the filter inside the bag. It's tricky, but doing this will let the excess oil drain into the bag instead of all over your exhaust tubing and everything else in the area. You should probably keep your oil catcher below you just in case, though!



After you've got it all cleaned up under there, take your fingertip and dab it in some oil, then moisten the rubber seal along the mounting edge of your new filter. I also pour in a small amount of fresh oil in the new filter to get the filter element moistened up a bit, but that probably isn't necessary. Carefully screw your new filter on and tighten to 19 ft.lbs / 26 N-m, or "until it starts resisting, then about a quarter/half turn more."

Now, unscrew the oil plug on the right side of your motor and start dumping in that fresh new oil!



This little plastic screw-on funnel thing is the best thing I ever found in the bins of crap beside the cash register at the local auto parts store. It makes adding oil with no mess a piece of cake. Now, add about 2 1/4 quarts of fresh oil to your bike, or until the oil gets close to the high mark on the little crankcase peephole. MAKE SURE to check this level when the bike is fully upright and NOT on the kick-stand, or you may overfill! The oil level is to be read ONLY when the engine is off and the bike is fully upright.



At this point you might think you're done. WELLLL, not quite. Screw the oil cap back on tight, and then start up your bike. Let her run for a minute or two while checking for any leaks around the drain bolt and filter, then shut her off. Now that the oil is spread throughout the system, you'll be able to add more oil until you're at the proper level, which is anywhere in between the 2 lines of the peephole. I ended up using all but the last 8 ounces of my 3rd bottle of oil, but your mileage may vary.

Now that you've given new lifeblood to your baby, buttoned her all back up, and checked for any leaks, time for another ride! Marvel to yourself at how much smoother she revs and shifts in a vain attempt to justify the additional cost of your fancy pure synthetic oil. Okay, you guys don't have to do that, but that's what I did, at least

So, in the end, changing the oil on the 500 is pretty easy. If you've got the time, tools, and the know-how, don't bother wasting your money letting a dealership do this simple task for you. Ride on!


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post #2 of 152 (permalink) Old 05-25-2013, 08:36 PM
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Good write up and photos, t0ad.

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post #3 of 152 (permalink) Old 05-25-2013, 08:37 PM
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Good write up with pictures! Thanks.

The biggest problem I've seen with novices is that they may over tighten the drain plug and strip the threads. In the U.S. Sears has a small torque wrench that will handle the ranges for the drain plug.

How do you measure the filter torque value?

I have several large, medium and one small filter wrenches that fit over the end of a filter and has a 1/2 inch nut to attach a torque wrench to. I've never used a torque wrench on a filter before. Hand tight with a quarter turn has always worked.

Once on a large American car, I could not break the filter loose. Finally I drove large screw driver through it and broke it loose. It made a big mess but I got it off!
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post #4 of 152 (permalink) Old 05-25-2013, 08:44 PM
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I esp. liked the part about 'pre-oiling' the oil filter !

Good trick - keeps engine from 'running dry' as long while waiting for oil pump to fill filter
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post #5 of 152 (permalink) Old 05-25-2013, 09:41 PM
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Thank you for uploading these images and taking the effort to teach us new riders some basics.
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post #6 of 152 (permalink) Old 05-25-2013, 10:02 PM
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Excellent pictures and nice tutorial.

How much to tighten an oil filter is really by "feel" based on experience.
I don't know anyone that uses a torque wrench on an oil filter.

Quick-Lube places will overtighten the filter, because they don't want it to come loose. They will get the blame.
So they overtighten them to cover their own rear-ends.
They also like to strip drain plugs, which is why I never take ANY of my machines anywhere for service.
I do it all myself. ( Of course, I was a professional mechanic for over 25 years. So that helps. )

I read these bikes take exactly 3 quarts oil at oil/filter change.
I would run the oil level at the TOP of the two lines.
I like to have the most oil I can safely get in my crankcase.
You don't want to overfill it too much, you don't want the crankshaft swimming in oil.

Oil changes are EASY on these bikes. Everything is easily accessible. No special tools required.
No reason to take it to a dealer for this, unless you have ZERO experience with tools, and you are afraid you would overtighten and strip something.

I like how you said to run the bike before you drain the oil.
That is a very important step. Yes, the engine and oil will be hot. But you will get a better oil change.
You will get more oil OUT of it, because hot oil drains better than cold oil.
And also... you will get more particles out, because they are suspended better in the oil.
Oil serves two main functions: 1 - lubricate the engine parts. 2 - act as a medium to trap and hold the byproducts of combustion as they pass through the oil filter.
( This includes metal particles associated with engine-wear. )
Oil also serves to help cool the engine.
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post #7 of 152 (permalink) Old 05-26-2013, 01:52 AM
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Is part 2 going to be 'How to check your valve clearances for the 600 mile service'?
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post #8 of 152 (permalink) Old 05-26-2013, 03:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marmite View Post
Is part 2 going to be 'How to check your valve clearances for the 600 mile service'?
I'll do that one for ya when I get my bike.

I hope I don't have to remove too much stuff to get the valve-cover off!
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post #9 of 152 (permalink) Old 05-26-2013, 04:31 AM
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Very nice informative step through. Might even try it myself. Cheers!
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post #10 of 152 (permalink) Old 05-26-2013, 11:14 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marmite View Post
Is part 2 going to be 'How to check your valve clearances for the 600 mile service'?
Haha, I'll leave that one to SandMantis I believe .. I'm not quite confident enough to try that one on my own just yet. I don't plan on checking mine for awhile yet anyway, even my dealership doesn't do valve checks on bikes until around 1k miles. Surprising, considering that I figured they'd want to make as much money as possible.

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